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Crime Technology

Unboxing the Fake Intel Core i7-920 257

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the recognize-boo-yaka-shah dept.
SkinnyGuy writes "The only thing more remarkable than NewEgg shipping fake Core i7 CPUs to customers is getting your hands on one and checking it out. Apparently there are only a couple hundred of these things in existence and Gearlog somehow managed to get and unbox one. The images are fascinating."
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Unboxing the Fake Intel Core i7-920

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  • to have added a third g to their name.

  • by Elbowgeek (633324) on Wednesday March 10, 2010 @01:14PM (#31428720) Journal

    That the fakes could become more valuable eventually than the real item, simply by dint of their fame and rarity.

    • by pesho (843750) on Wednesday March 10, 2010 @01:23PM (#31428848)
      Don't count on this. I am sure somebody in China keeps on cranking thousands of those as we speak. They already have gone through the trouble of making molds for the fake fan and CPU. Why stop now when with all this publicity there will be a market for the fakes as collectibles?
      • by MightyMartian (840721) on Wednesday March 10, 2010 @01:29PM (#31428922) Journal

        At least the lead used to make these things won't end up in childrens' toys or in baby food.

      • by fm6 (162816)

        Which leaves one big question unanswered: why bother? Was somebody actually dumb enough to believe they could sell enough lead "processors" to make the whole thing worthwhile?

        • by Sperbels (1008585)

          why bother? Was somebody actually dumb enough to believe they could sell enough lead "processors" to make the whole thing worthwhile?

          What makes you think they haven't already? I'm sure whoever did this sold the whole batch to someone, or swapped out real chips for the fakes.

        • by clarkkent09 (1104833) * on Wednesday March 10, 2010 @02:33PM (#31429740)
          Was somebody actually dumb enough to believe they could sell enough lead "processors" to make the whole thing worthwhile?

          Probably not. Which leads me to think that the plan was not to sell fakes as the real thing but was to steal a whole lot of the real processors and replace them with fakes so it wouldn't be noticed for a while.
    • by istartedi (132515) on Wednesday March 10, 2010 @01:27PM (#31428886) Journal

      the fakes could become more valuable eventually than the real item

      At least until somebody starts faking the fakes.

      • by pesho (843750)
        No, No, No! Making fakes of the fakes, will only make the original fakes even more valuable.
      • by Pojut (1027544)

        Divide by zero much?

      • At least until somebody starts faking the fakes.

        Nothing is worse than the feeling you get when you find out that you got duped. What you thought was the fake lead CPU that you ordered, turns out instead to be an imitation made of cadmium.

    • Display models? (Score:3, Insightful)

      by teko_teko (653164)

      They could be units that were made by a separate company for display model purposes.

      Just like those fake TVs in IKEA. They're only the shell without anything inside.

    • by kramerd (1227006)

      Actually, no, thats not what irony means.

      It is absurd, unreasonable, and somewhat depressing (from my point of view, at least) that fakes are more valuable than useful CPUs, but it is most certainly not ironic.

      • by ArsonSmith (13997)

        ironic /arnk/ Show Spelled[ahy-ron-ik] Show IPA
        -adjective

        1. containing or exemplifying irony: an ironic novel; an ironic remark.
        2. ironical.
        3. coincidental; unexpected: It was ironic that I was seated next to my ex-husband at the dinner.
  • Warning! (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 10, 2010 @01:15PM (#31428726)

    They are saying the processor is actually made of lead, so the overclocking potential is dismal.

    That combined with the underpowered foam cooler relegates this processor to HTPC uses only.

  • by seeker_1us (1203072) on Wednesday March 10, 2010 @01:16PM (#31428752)
    The cpu "cooler." The misspellings on the box. This was fraud.
  • by e2d2 (115622) on Wednesday March 10, 2010 @01:18PM (#31428782)

    My friend once bought an Alpine stereo from someone. When we looked closer at the box it was actually "Alphine" with an h. Okay so typical story. The funny part was the box. It had a picture of a Lamborghini on it. But the one they took a picture of was actually a toy. You could see this when you looked close. They didn't even bother to use a real Lamborghini picture! Even that was a fake! We couldn't stop laughing for at least an hour. The lengths some people will go to dupe people, if they spent that energy on creating something with actual worth..

    • by gad_zuki! (70830) on Wednesday March 10, 2010 @01:23PM (#31428840)

      >They didn't even bother to use a real Lamborghini picture! Even that was a fake!

      Its like a movie where the killer is always giving the police hints on his next crime. The fraudster gave your friend at least two hints, but he still bought it. Even fraudsters have the occasional attack of conscience.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by JumpDrive (1437895)
      Hey if it works for the US financial system and government it can't really be that bad of a business model.
    • by pluther (647209)

      My first DVD player was made by "Sany".
      It actually worked (mostly) for over a year before it finally overheated and died completely.
      I knew it was a cheap knockoff, but this was way back in 2000 when DVD players still cost money, and it was something like $40, including a free copy of Fightclub.

    • by tsalmark (1265778)
      Some people are trying so hard to get a steal, they don't look at the details till after. I especially like the guys selling cheap speakers out of a rental truck, telling you they are stolen, when in reality they are just charging 4 times retail for crappy speakers in cheap plywood boxes.
    • That reminds me of the time I tried to order a magnetbox television from my sorny laptop.

  • fine (Score:3, Interesting)

    by circletimessquare (444983) <circletimessquar ... m ['l.c' in gap]> on Wednesday March 10, 2010 @01:21PM (#31428818) Homepage Journal

    just as long as we catch the fake lead PHARMACEUTICALS

    • Not much chance of that. Since lead often shows up in the company of calcium(and, in the body, plays all kinds of havoc by acting as a calcium analog well enough to be incorporated into bones and important chemistry; but not well enough for that important chemistry to actually work), the pills it tends to end up in are the assorted vitamin and mineral supplements.

      Such things are subject to extremely minimal regulation, and less scrutiny. Since low levels of lead are unlikely to cause dramatic symptoms in
    • by Ant P. (974313)

      Q: What's the difference between a $50 brand-name pill and a $2 "fake"?
      A: $48.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by RIAAShill (1599481)

        Q: What's the difference between a $50 brand-name pill and a $2 "fake"?
        A: $48.

        If you are lucky. Counterfeit pharmaceuticals are not like generics. If you purchase a counterfeit, you don't know who is providing you with the drug. You think you are buying it from Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer, Roche, etc. But the counterfeiters have stolen the identity of the company, so you can't easily go after the suppliers of your drugs if their quality is poor.

        Generics, on the other hand, do not hide who they are.

        • EE here.

          Counterfeit parts start fires. My co-worker was testing a 400A breaker, but it didn't trip. It eventually melted at about 800A, which did technically break the circuit, but not in an approved manner.

          It looked fully legit, holograms, nice box, everything.

        • Counterfeit pharmaceuticals may not even be a drug at all. They are only designed to look like the correct drug. They could be poison.
  • hey (Score:4, Funny)

    by nomadic (141991) <nomadicworldNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Wednesday March 10, 2010 @01:24PM (#31428860) Homepage
    Are they saying a picture of a fan does not provide the same level of cooling as a real fan?
    • by natehoy (1608657)

      No, it works, but the picture wasn't blue. Only blue has inherent cooling properties.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Are they saying a picture of a fan does not provide the same level of cooling as a real fan?

      That depends on if you're using an Intel Magritte or not...

    • by eln (21727)
      I hope not, I'd hate to think I covered all the vents in my computer case with these fan decals for nothing.
    • by Chris Burke (6130)

      Are they saying a picture of a fan does not provide the same level of cooling as a real fan?

      No, it does, and the box includes a picture of a frequency/temperature monitor you can glue to your screen to prove it.

    • Where are the real-world tests? I bet that lead-core CPU stays at room temperature with the picture fan even under heavy load.
    • Are they saying a picture of a fan does not provide the same level of cooling as a real fan?

      It's at least as good as the fan that came with my retail boxed E8400. 59C in a cool basement server room isn't exactly optimal for a non-overclocked system.

  • "Apparently there are only a couple hundred of these things in existence..."

    And now, due to all the stories about them, they have become modern-day artifacts and will probably sell on eBay as collectibles for more than the real thing.

  • by dziman (415307) on Wednesday March 10, 2010 @01:35PM (#31429010)

    I seriously doubt these lead processors are ROHS compliant.

    • by kpainter (901021)
      No, but what else are they going to do with all that leftover lead that they didn't put in ROHS parts? They already got caught putting it in children's toys.
  • by ventmonkey (1578351) on Wednesday March 10, 2010 @01:39PM (#31429052) Homepage
    What, no benchmarks?
  • Postage stamps mis-printed are worth quite a bit of money. One with a post mark can potentially make you a millionaire.

    Interesting that a few of these could end up worth more than their original bretheran.
    • by Locke2005 (849178)
      Misprinted stamps and mistruck coins created by the government are worth quite a bit; counterfeit ones with the same flaws are worthless. If Intel themselves had made these, they would be worth big bucks. As fakes, they are not only worthless, but pretty easy to make bootleg copies of, so no, they will never be worth anything as collector's items.
  • by wowbagger (69688) on Wednesday March 10, 2010 @01:50PM (#31429222) Homepage Journal

    "Hmm. Mis-spellings on the box. A sticker of a fan. A solid block of metal for the CPU.

    I'd say the buyers were

    <removes sunglasses>

    mis-lead."

    YEEAAAAAAAAH!

  • So I guess this product isn't ROHS compliant, then...

It was kinda like stuffing the wrong card in a computer, when you're stickin' those artificial stimulants in your arm. -- Dion, noted computer scientist

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