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European Parliament Declaring War Against ACTA 307

Posted by Soulskill
from the taking-out-the-trash dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The European Parliament is preparing to take on ACTA. A joint resolution (DOC) has been tabled by the major EP parties that threatens to go to court unless things change. The EP is calling for public access to negotiation texts and rules out further confidential negotiations. Moreover, the EP wants a ban on imposing a three-strikes model, assurances that ACTA will not result in personal searches at the border, and an ACTA impact assessment on fundamental rights and data protection."
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European Parliament Declaring War Against ACTA

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  • Three-strikes (Score:5, Insightful)

    by ibwolf (126465) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @11:30AM (#31414120)

    Recent polls show that most people regard Internet access as a fundamental right and considering how important Internet access has become that is very understandable.

    Thus any three-strikes law would likely be in violation of the European Convention on Human Rights and be struck down by the European Court of Human Rights.

    Given that it makes sense for MEP to oppose three-strikes provisions as they can not be certain of implementing them and could potentially suffer very negative fallout for trying.

  • by Akido37 (1473009) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @11:31AM (#31414136)
    For all the anti-European sentiment here in the United States, specifically against France, it's ironic that we're becoming more dependent on them protecting our civil liberties.

    If they don't do it, our government (no matter what Administration) surely won't do it.
  • Re:Three-strikes (Score:5, Insightful)

    by sopssa (1498795) * <sopssa@email.com> on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @11:33AM (#31414160) Journal

    Exactly this. Most of the government services in my country are being moved to over internet too (or at least trying to), so cutting down ones Internet connection wouldn't cut. It is really required in current day.

  • An American (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Das Auge (597142) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @11:34AM (#31414190)
    As an American, I say, "Thank you very much", to the EU.
  • by jgreco (1542031) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @11:37AM (#31414250)

    Wasn't there a time when the US led the world in freedom, liberty, and openness?

    I know I'm going to get horribly trolled for this, but damn it, it needs to be said.

  • Re:ACTA (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @11:38AM (#31414270)

    once its economy gets closer to being representative of the US model

    Why would it get closer to the US model? If anything, the European economies have only got more open in the past decade.

  • by Nicolas MONNET (4727) <(moc.liamg) (ta) (avitlaocin)> on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @11:48AM (#31414404) Journal

    One, real life example of this alleged "bureaucracy" inconveniencing you.

    Go ahead. ....

    Stop reading the Daily Fail. kthxbye

  • by jgreco (1542031) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @11:49AM (#31414428)

    We (the consumers) aren't really a party to the negotiation; the government is negotiating on our behalf to work on legitimate problems such as counterfeit goods. The real parties to the negotiation are businesses and government. As such, the businesses are pushing to get all the things they'd like to see, even where they're not really in the interests of the public. Government is dazzled by the show, and will tend to go along with a lot of things, especially where the businesses have been successful with propaganda.

  • Re:ACTA (Score:3, Insightful)

    by YeeHaW_Jelte (451855) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @11:51AM (#31414454) Homepage

    Your theory fails on account of it assuming some centralized leadership that is actually able to coordinate all these manoeuvres so as to make the false impression that they are acting on behalf of the people of the EU, at least for the time being.

    You have to take my word for it that 'the' EU as such does not exist, nor that it is lead in such a coherent fashion.

  • by realsilly (186931) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @11:51AM (#31414456)

    The secrecy behind this act is insane. People have the right to Fair Use. And our Constitution and Bill of Right are meant to protect the people. Companies are not People, and that what this ACTA seems to be protecting, the bottom line of profit. Kudos European Parliament!

  • by Vapula (14703) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @11:52AM (#31414470)

    Well, I think it's only a false image... At first, "american" were greedy colonists (either going to america to flee some judicial problems in europe or going there to make some big profit).

    While esclavagism had mostly disappeared in Europe, it had been brought back in US...

    US has always be about freedom without limits... If you succeed in earning money, it gave you the right to "enslave" other people (well, employing them with minimal salaries), to crush the other trying to earn their living (most known example on slashdot is Microsoft... but it's true for many other),...

    On the other hand, in Europe, it had been more and more about limiting personal freedom so it don't infringe on someone other's freedom (I won't say it was perfectly done)... Corporate greed also existed in europe... long ago... And it's brought back from the US (and other) thanks to the buyouts, merges, ...

  • Re:ACTA (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @11:53AM (#31414480)

    This is not a struggle EU vs. someone else, it's between the various branches within Europe.

    The EU Parliament gained additional privileges in December, and they're eager to use them now, while the EU Commissions feel like they can go on like before. It's an act of self-preservation of the EP as a relevant entity in the European framework. If they don't make sure they get their say in these agreement now (no matter what the outcome), they're mostly irrelevant again.

    This is not about eliminating ACTA, but about the secrecy around it. The EP's main gripe is that someone is representing Europe without a mandate or accountability, to create a deal that the EP is eventually asked to sign. And guess what the arguments will be once ACTA is at that stage:
    1. "You have to sign this, or the international community will not consider the EU a reasonable partner"
    2. Just look what the US did with the SWIFT agreement (ambassadors etc. stalking our representatives)

  • Re:ACTA (Score:5, Insightful)

    by khallow (566160) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @11:59AM (#31414578)

    Unlike the US, that has an economy that is mostly closed (despite what you may think, our import/exports make up only a small amount of GDP)

    A quarter of the US GDP is in imports and exports. It's not a small amount. Looking at the CIA World Factbook [cia.gov], the EU and US seem to have similar levels of imports and exports (remember interstate trade between EU members doesn't count as imports and exports from the EU itself, else we should count interstate trade between US states as well). I get that the US has 15% of its GDP in imports and 9% in exports. The EU has 11% of its GDP in imports and 13% of its GDP in exports.

  • by KlaymenDK (713149) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @12:00PM (#31414598) Journal

    Companies are not People

    You're absolutely right. In many regards they enjoy superior rights than people. :-/

  • by rrossman2 (844318) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @12:01PM (#31414606)
    Yes, I'm an American and I find it fantastic that Canada and the EP have a damn head on their shoulders. As long as Americans believe there are ONLY TWO POLITICAL PARTIES, this country will be f'ed. Those in control have been there too long and need to be replaced. The problem is those two parties have all the money for running real political campaigns. If an independent or some other political party had the money to actually get their name out, AND (and a HUGE and) if the American people wouldn't just vote BASED ON A PARTY NAME, things in this country could be much better. As it is now, you have two real parties and one of them is basically given control of the congress and/or house so they can just push what bills they want out the door. IF American's would actually open up their mind and quit voting by party name, and IF we could get 4, 5, or 6 PARTIES into congress and house, thing would be less "This is what we (as in the controlling party) want, push it though!" to more checks and balances on the whole process. It wouldn't be a controlling group with the same ideas in charge, but a mix of ideas from a range of people.. and I have a feeling it would keep more crap like this from appearing, as well as cut back on all the bullshit tucked away in bills.
  • by Vapula (14703) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @12:02PM (#31414624)

    well, it's up to you (in USA) to push for SHORTER copyright terms... Vote with your wallet, write to your local politicians, organise some big MPAA hit boycott, ...

    At first, copyright was about a SHORT LIMITED TIME, now, it's longer and longer... with the clear intent to make it infinite...

    It's up to you to push for a ban on stupid patents... Explain to other that if they have to pay more for their MP3/camera/... it's because of the so many patent fees on trivial or outdated technologies... I'd say that for everything computer-related, max patent duration should be 1 or 2 year... That's the rate at which most computer technologies become more or less obsolete...

    It's up to you to say no to the removal of HQ on analog signals on TV/DVD/BluRay/... and to say no to the enforcement of HDCP and removal of analog signal later... Unless you want that your equipment becomes obsolete and you had to replace it...

    It's up to you to shake your legal system, to prevent bullies (oops... corporation) from dragging court process until the other part can't pay for court and attorneys fees.

  • Re:An American (Score:5, Insightful)

    by BobMcD (601576) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @12:11PM (#31414776)

    I came to post the same thing. Or, actually -

    Today I sit as an American watching the Europeans teach us a thing or two about Freedom.

  • by Xest (935314) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @12:11PM (#31414794)

    Interestingly there's also a movement in the EU now to do away with the airline data sharing deal whereby something like 49 pieces of information like e-mail address, name, address, telephone number, credit card details and so forth are sent to the US before people are allowed to fly there from Europe.

    It's quite a turn around since the Lisbon treaty and the last set of European elections, I was concerned there'd be less standing up to the US, but there is in fact even more now.

  • acta backfires (Score:5, Insightful)

    by circletimessquare (444983) <circletimessquare@NoSpaM.gmail.com> on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @12:19PM (#31414934) Homepage Journal

    media corporations and their paid-for government whores are attempting to backdoor their oligopolistic unneeded parasitical existence into the internet age

    but the people have spoken: we like our freedoms very much, and it is clear the internet has meant that your continued existence means compromising our freedoms in ways we don't like. so i guess you'll just have to die then, unnecessary media corporations

    artists, writers, directors: you don't need old school distributors. there's a better, free, distributor: the internet. sure, you won't get pennies everytime someone sings your song in the shower (while some lawyer asshole gets the lion share of pennies) but you'll get fabulous exposure and advertising and presence. then you can tour, and make money the honest way

  • Re:Europe (Score:3, Insightful)

    by cbope (130292) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @12:31PM (#31415174)

    Thank You!.. plus you won't need to go through that whole photograph, fingerprint and awkward questions thing at the border when you come for a visit! Welcome to the EU!

  • by twisteddk (201366) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @12:35PM (#31415210)

    The multiparty systems exists in many countries, especially here in the EU.
    And I'm sad to say that a lot of bull STILL gets passed, because for an extended period of time, several parties who jointly have a majority simply agree what laws are to be passed. It's no different than the two party system. In fact, on many levels it's WORSE, because now you have 3-4 parties who all wants a piece of the action, so everything is a compromise. And is they ever agree on something, its a political hot potatoe, and any legislation passed in a hurry is crap because noone considers the consequences.

    The only real upside is that voters CAN actually "punish" their party by voting for a different party with largly the same views, so you dont have to go from one extreme to the other. Thus its slightly more democratic, and equally bad ;)

  • Another nonwar (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Thaelon (250687) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @12:37PM (#31415254)

    Can we please stop saying we're declaring war on things that aren't sovereign nations?

    Let's especially stop if they're ideas, conferences, or pieces of paper.

  • Re:An American (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Xphile101361 (1017774) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @12:59PM (#31415620)

    As an American, I say, "Thank you very much", to the EU.

    As an American, I say that we should have the balls to do what the EU is doing for us.

  • Re:An American (Score:4, Insightful)

    by frosty_tsm (933163) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @01:19PM (#31415930)

    I came to post the same thing. Or, actually -

    Today I sit as an American watching the Europeans teach us a thing or two about Freedom.

    I like "234 years after the revolution, the British have stepped in to protect America's freedom."

  • Re:ACTA (Score:3, Insightful)

    by copponex (13876) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @01:35PM (#31416168) Homepage

    which are significant obstacles to an interstate insurance market and a contributor to the high US health care costs

    I imagine it's the same level of contribution that frivolous lawsuits add - nearly 2%!

    Health care is expensive because Americans have terrible diets, they don't exercise, and they expect a pill to solve problems like obesity. Since health coverage is out of reach of nearly 50 million Americans, everyone receives last minute care at hospitals instead of preventative care at less expensive clinics. And when they can afford health care, doctors maximize useless services and tests to push up profits, even when they are duplicative or entirely unnecessary. The incentive structure is totally fucked.

    We are so far behind in quality of life at this point that it's embarrassing. Every time I overhear someone making fun of the fact that people in the EU get a month of paid vacation, or like you, claim that all we need to do is release the last threads of protection against the greed of giant insurers, I am again awed by the power of corporate propaganda.

  • Re:ACTA (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Heed00 (1473203) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @01:41PM (#31416268)

    We weren't talking about the price of tea in China. We were discussing why the ACTA is being fought by the European Union. Please stay on topic.

    It only looks off topic if you quote your interlocutor out of context. Let's look at the actual context:

    Also, are you really serious about us economy being closed? Did you forget China and Taiwan, the Indian coders and phone support, even us mail manual processing being offshored to Singapore? You can't be serious.

    Which was in response to this:

    Unlike the US, that has an economy that is mostly closed...

    Claiming to be subject to a violation of logic (an Ad Hominem) on the one hand, but then blatantly quoting out of context on the other in order to deliver a snide and condescending reply is really inconsistent -- at best.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @01:47PM (#31416368)

    The only real upside is that voters CAN actually "punish" their party by voting for a different party with largly the same views, so you dont have to go from one extreme to the other. Thus its slightly more democratic, and equally bad ;)

    If your first sentence is true, I (as a US Citizen) wouldn't consider it was equally bad. Rather it is far from ideal, but still better than the de facto two-party system in the USA.

  • Re:An American (Score:5, Insightful)

    by aaandre (526056) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @02:28PM (#31416864)

    We Americans can teach everyone about Hype of Freedom.

    Let's just not mistake it for the real thing.

  • by unity100 (970058) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @02:32PM (#31416914) Homepage Journal

    it was in low countries (netherlands and belgium) that the first baselines for age of reason were laid, and it was in late 18th century france that age of enlightenment (which has created the concept of rights of the ordinary man and equality) has come to being.

    there is nothing to be ashamed or feel inferior or hate. these are fundamental principles that go beyond and above nationalities and locales. we should all support these from wherever, from whomever they come out.

  • by unity100 (970058) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @03:00PM (#31417282) Homepage Journal

    https://www.secure.europarl.europa.eu/parliament/public/petition/secured/submit.do?language=EN [europa.eu]

    if you are a eu citizen, or if you are a eu candidate country's citizen, or if you are working for a company with its headquarters is in eu, you can petition Eu parliament directly.

  • by Anomalyst (742352) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @03:06PM (#31417382)

    both Red and Blue partys are the same color - servile corporate yellow.

    Not totally yellow, of course, it does get very brownish as it reaches the tip of their noses.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @03:32PM (#31417754)
    Well, most Americans think that, because they were the first to implement a modern democracy, they invented the underlying ideas. They think the USA is the last bastion of freedom (see Tea Partiers demonizing socialized medicine) and don't like their noses rubbed in it when somebody shows them up for being nearly all hat and very little horse.
  • by myowntrueself (607117) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @03:52PM (#31418004)

    Yes, I'm an American and I find it fantastic that Canada and the EP have a damn head on their shoulders.

    Maybe not so much 'head on their shoulders' as 'balls between their legs'.

    The EP has 'grown a pair'.

  • heh (Score:3, Insightful)

    by unity100 (970058) on Tuesday March 09, 2010 @05:09PM (#31419142) Homepage Journal

    before they 'implemented' modern democracy, modern democracy was being practised in netherlands, britain already long before.

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