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Scientology Charged With Slavery, Human Trafficking 802

Posted by kdawson
from the to-name-but-a-few dept.
eldavojohn writes "A formal complaint was filed in California (caged PDF) last week by John Lindstein naming David Miscavige and the Church of Scientology International as defendants. Lindstein claims that for sixteen years (from age 8) he was forced to work as a slave at Gold Base, a secret CoS site run by Golden Era Productions with 'razor wire, security guard patrols, surveillance posts, and three roll calls each day.' The pay was $50 a week. The allegations include 'Violations of wage and hour laws as well as unfair/illegal business practices actionable under California B&P 17200 Et. Seq.' and a complaint under the 13th Amendment of the US Constitution, which abolished slavery. Members of the group Anonymous praised the summons."
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Scientology Charged With Slavery, Human Trafficking

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  • really? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by sopssa (1498795) * <sopssa@email.com> on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:31PM (#30289174) Journal

    Was this a surprise to anyone?

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Narcocide (102829)

      I hate those motherfuckers and I live right in their neighborhood but seriously, it was a surprise to me.

    • Yes... (Score:5, Interesting)

      by SuperKendall (25149) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:53PM (#30289498)

      I'm not fan of scientology, or any cult really - but a mainstream organization with illegal work camps? I just never expected that, at all. You'd think the lid would have come off something that extreme some time ago. And what are they even having them do in these camps, build the theta monitors?

      • Re:Yes... (Score:5, Informative)

        by royallthefourth (1564389) <royallthefourth@gmail.com> on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:03PM (#30289642)
        I think you're confusing "mainstream" and "infamous"
      • Re:Yes... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Penguinisto (415985) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:05PM (#30289660) Journal

        Dude - there are (and were) cults out in the US today that do much, much worse. Past examples? Branch Davidians (Waco), the SunYungMoon group during the 1980's ("Moonies"), and the recent polygamy compound in Colorado City, Arizona. They all stand out as some rather egregious examples, and I don't doubt there are more of 'em out there today.

        They don't have barbed wire and guards per se, but I'm willing to wager that their denizens are brainwashed enough that none of the fencing and such is necessary.

        • by SuperKendall (25149) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:20PM (#30289918)

          Dude - there are (and were) cults out in the US today that do much, much worse.

          Yes there are, but nothing on the scale of Scientology. The bigger the group the bigger the target, the harder to keep secrets.

          That's what I mean by being surprised. A local compound in one city? Zero information coming out of that would surprise me. But again, for something as large and well known as scientology... it is odd to me that this has not come forward before and is being practiced at all. They don't need to do this after all, they are making money hand over fist as it is.

          • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:58PM (#30290406)

            People have known about the forced servitude of scientology for a long time. Its just that this is perhaps the first time anyone has had the combination of resources and bravery to stand up against it. And this is an example of bravery, some people that speak out against scientology have found themselves mysteriously dead.

        • Re:Yes... (Score:5, Insightful)

          by dreamchaser (49529) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:21PM (#30289924) Homepage Journal

          Quite right. GP also referred to the CoS as 'mainstream'. There is nothing mainstream about them. Most other countries don't even recognize them as a religion. They are a money making / power grabbing scheme dreamed up by a second rate megalomaniac science fiction author that has now taken on a life of its own.

      • Re:Yes... (Score:5, Informative)

        by eldavojohn (898314) * <eldavojohnNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:07PM (#30289700) Journal

        And what are they even having them do in these camps, build the theta monitors?

        From the Infinite Complacency Link:

        At 12, he was “deemed finished with schooling” and Golden Era Productions, an unincorporated division of Church of Scientology International (CSI) hired him as a messenger and errand boy.

        But in 1997, at the age of 15, he was demoted to the post of dishwasher. “He worked 16-hour days cleaning pots, pans and the dining facilities,” says the lawsuit.

        And soon afterwards, he was assigned to do construction at the base near Hemet, California.

        So the answer to your question is messenger, dish washer then construction worker. I mean, why use all the money you take from your followers to hire people to do this work when you can force the followers to do it for less or even free? L Ron Hubbard's Get Rich Quick Scam is yet another valid title for Scientology.

      • Re:Yes... (Score:5, Informative)

        by KiloByte (825081) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:39PM (#30290158)

        Yes, for example church-run (ie, most of them) orphanages in Ireland [wikipedia.org]. All of physical abuse, sexual abuse and forced labor.

      • Re:Yes... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Runaway1956 (1322357) * on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:44PM (#30290222) Homepage Journal

        Yes, please, define "mainstream". Just because an organization makes the news frequently doesn't make them "mainstream". Take a hard look at the people who claim to be Scientologists. Fringe freaking element, all around. Huh? You point to some celebrity or other? Your point being what, exactly? Whoa, dude, you need to look at those celebrities again. We make celebrities out of people like Roman Polanski, who likes little girls. We make celebrities out of the likes of Michael Jackson, who liked - uhhh - sleepovers with little boys. We make celebrities out of rap singers who "sing" about killing cops. We make celebrities of other "singers" who celebrate gang raping little girls. Just because Tom Cruise happens to be in movies, people like his movies, does NOT make CoS "mainstream".
        America worships freaks, but that worship doesn't make them "mainstream".

      • Re:Yes... (Score:4, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @07:16PM (#30290618)

        It did. The debt slavery in $cientology has been documented by its former members for years, including the child labor used to keep their buildings intact. Young $cientologists grow up with quite a large debt to the cult for their "auditing" sessions, during which they also confess any crimes with the e-meter, actually a primitive polygraph test whose results are often faked, and those confessions can be used to blackmail members into remaining in the cult or remaining silent if they ever escape.

        Details are over at www.factnet.org and www.xenu.net, it's fascinating material.

      • Re:Yes... (Score:5, Informative)

        by lennier (44736) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @10:13PM (#30292544) Homepage

        "I'm not fan of scientology, or any cult really - but a mainstream organization with illegal work camps? I just never expected that, at all. You'd think the lid would have come off something that extreme some time ago."

        It has, if you were paying attention.

        CoS's 'Rehabilitation Project Force' labour camps and other extreme 'Ethics' measures have been common knowledge since the 1990s - just check the extensive files on Operation Clambake - http://xenu.net/ [xenu.net] .

        However, CoS tends to sue massively and engage in lots of dirty tricks whenever the mainstream media cover them at all negatively, which is why you may not have heard about this stuff if you don't get your news from the Net.

        They tried to censor Usenet back in the early 90s. It didn't work so well for them. Anonymous is just the latest round in a long battle of CoS Versus The Internet.

    • Re:really? (Score:5, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:06PM (#30289674)
      Posting anonymously because... well... I'm anonymous, and this information has been removed from slashdot before due to COS C&D letters.

      In the words of Trey Parker and Matt Stone, 'THIS IS WHAT SCIENTOLOGISTS ACTUALLY BELIEVE!!'

      As quoted from L. Ron Hubbard:

      The head of the Galactic Federation (76 planets around larger stars visible from here) (founded 95,000,000 years ago, very space opera) solved overpopulation (250 billion or so per planet, 178 billion on average) by mass implanting. He caused people to be brought to Teegeeack (Earth) and put an H-Bomb on the principal volcanos (Incident II) and then the Pacific area ones were taken in boxes to Hawaii and the Atlantic area ones to Las Palmas and there "packaged".

      His name was Xenu. He used renegades. Various misleading data by means of circuits etc. was placed in the implants.

      When through with his crime loyal officers (to the people) captured him after six years of battle and put him in an electronic mountain trap where he still is. "They" are gone. The place (Confederation) has since been a desert. The length and brutality of it all was such that this Confederation never recovered. The implant is calculated to kill (by pneumonia etc) anyone who attempts to solve it. This liability has been dispensed with by my tech development.

      One can freewheel through the implant and die unless it is approached as precisely outlined. The "freewheel" (auto-running on and on) lasts too long, denies sleep etc and one dies. So be careful to do only Incidents I and II as given and not plow around and fail to complete one thetan at a time.

      In December 1967 I knew someone had to take the plunge. I did and emerged very knocked out, but alive. Probably the only one ever to do so in 75,000,000 years. I have all the data now, but only that given here is needful.

      One's body is a mass of individual thetans stuck to oneself or to the body.

      One has to clean them off by running incident II and Incident I. It is a long job, requiring care, patience and good auditing. You are running beings. They respond like any preclear. Some large, some small.

      Thetans believed they were one. This is the primary error. Good luck.

    • I Was Surprised (Score:5, Informative)

      by eldavojohn (898314) * <eldavojohnNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:16PM (#30289818) Journal

      Was this a surprise to anyone?

      As the submitter, yeah I have to admit it kind of was. This is a really unique opportunity for a case against CoS because normally the cases come from outsiders.

      Lindstein was eight years old and says he was forced to work for 16 years. He was removed from school at age 12. Now, if you were removed from school at age 12, you probably aren't very well suited for a high paying job. So you have someone who's lost much of their youth to Scientology and has the motivation to see this suit through to the end.

      You see, when you sue or slander Scientology, you might not realize what you're getting yourself into. People end up doing jail for posting verbal attacks on Scientology online. To quote the late L. Ron Hubbard [wikiquote.org] on his policy:

      This is the correct procedure: Spot who is attacking us. Start investigating them promptly for felonies or worse using our own professionals, not outside agencies. Double curve our reply by saying we welcome an investigation of them. Start feeding lurid, blood sex crime actual evidence on the attackers to the press. Don't ever tamely submit to an investigation of us. Make it rough, rough on attackers all the way. * "Attacks on Scientology" (25 February 1966)

      That's what you're dealing with. That's what Lindstein has in his future. He probably knows it, his lawyer probably knows it. But he will soon be subjected to character assassination, harassment of just barely legal amounts, indirect threats and the same for any family he may have.

      So yeah, I'm a pleasantly surprised that such an opportune individual has stepped forward to speak and let us know what Scientology is. Because in so many other cases, the individual has been silenced one way or another. And scientology has refined it's processes to force its members quiet and they have the resources and legal representation to make magic happen in the courts.

      I hope Lindstein is telling the whole truth and nothing but the truth. I wish him the best of luck in the courtroom and for justice to be brought against those who forced him into labor and stripped him of his right to knowledge.

      • Re:I Was Surprised (Score:5, Informative)

        by Rakarra (112805) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @10:09PM (#30292504)

        You see, when you sue or slander Scientology, you might not realize what you're getting yourself into. People end up doing jail for posting verbal attacks on Scientology online. ...

        That's what you're dealing with. That's what Lindstein has in his future. He probably knows it, his lawyer probably knows it. But he will soon be subjected to character assassination, harassment of just barely legal amounts, indirect threats and the same for any family he may have.

        I think most people also don't realize just how much worse a situation Lindstein is in. For non-Scientologists, the Church really has to work to try to dig up skeletons in the closet, to figure out just what could possibly embarrass and discredit you. But for ex-Scientologists, it's much worse, because they already know everything about you. You see, confession is part of the religion. That's hardly abnormal, but the difference is that you must confess something new. And you have to confess. So you'll be in a room with a dozen people screaming at you to confess some past sin. Something. And then that information is written down. Over the years they wring everything out of you, and it's all documented. Then when you turn against the church later in life, that information is released. Did you ever have a romantic affair with a fellow staffer? That will come out. Maybe when you were really young you curiously touched the family pet when he was humping your leg? Oh, you bet that will be shown. Everyone has something that they're not proud of that they don't want anyone to know. And the church will have confessionals for all of it. Of course they don't WANT to do this. " Yingling and Davis said the church doesn't relish using documents from ethics files. But after the four defectors spoke out against Miscavige, the lawyer and spokesman said they had no choice." That statement and others can be found from the amazing St. Petersburg Times series on Scientology: http://www.tampabay.com/news/article1012148.ece [tampabay.com]. Utterly amazing.

        So yeah, Lindstein is in for a rough time.

    • by reporter (666905) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:17PM (#30289838) Homepage
      If you know anyone who is trapped -- physically or mentally -- inside a cult like the Church of Scientology, then please contact Rick Ross [rickross.com]. The life of the victim may depend on your getting Ross' help as soon as possible.
  • I love it! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by mcgrew (92797) * on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:31PM (#30289186) Homepage Journal

    Now if we can see a slashdot article saying that they were found guilty and someone went to prison for it... the fat lady ain't sang yet, boys.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Sorry, that won't happen. The Co$'s lawyers will ensure that they get off. Not only that, but they've infiltrated the government and justice system to the point where I'm surprised they don't have laws exempting them from these types of charges.
  • by FatSean (18753) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:32PM (#30289194) Homepage Journal

    First the Catholics with child rape, now the Scientologists with slavery and human trafficking.

    Any wagers on which one true religion will be busted next?

    • by Darkness404 (1287218) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:40PM (#30289304)
      It isn't religion that is the problem, it is organization and trust. Take any group of trusted people and you will find that a minority want to use their trust for personal gain. In America, corporations, schools, etc. are all looked at pretty thoroughly for abuses, religion usually isn't.
      • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:52PM (#30289472) Journal
        Religions, though, have the unpleasant architectural problem of (in the vast majority of cases) coupling social and organizational power with strongly implied, or even overt, assertions of trustworthiness.

        Because they purport to deal in moral and divine matters, those who have power within the organization generally(either as an official point of doctrine, or in lay understanding) tend to be imbued with greater "goodness" or "holiness" or access to divine command, or whatever. Priests and CEOs are both potentially dangerous, and quite likely to cover for their buddies; but you don't generally tell children that CEOs are trusted authority figures who deserve their respect and obedience.
        • by WarwickRyan (780794) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:00PM (#30289608)

          > but you don't generally tell children that CEOs are trusted authority figures who deserve their respect and obedience.

          Well, unless their name is Steve Jobs.

    • by Xtravar (725372) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:46PM (#30289382) Homepage Journal

      Hmm, how come every Scientology story must have some post diverting attention to Catholicism, trying to lend legitimacy to Scientology as a religion?

      Let's stick to the topic at hand, shall we? And that topic is that Scientology apparently enslaved this person.

    • by houstonbofh (602064) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:50PM (#30289442)
      I think you started a little late. The Muslim crusades. The Catholic crusades. The Inquisition. (What a show...) The common thread is people... A corrupt person has no problem using anything as an excuse from religion, to communism, to security, to social justice. No "idea" stays pure once people start to use it.
      • by tbannist (230135) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:09PM (#30289718)

        Many people would say some organizational structures are better able to resist corruption than others. It's been my perception that (monotheistic) religion is particular vulnerable to corruption since it's trivially easy for the organization to be corrupted from the top down. In most cases the leader is expected to be the holiest of people and thus even questioning the leader can easily be cast as lack of faith in the entire religion.

        Even if everything can be corrupted, but it might useful to look at how easily corrupted different organizational structures are.

    • by elrous0 (869638) * on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:01PM (#30289622)
      I have it on good authority that the Amish are running a dog fighting ring.
  • by guruevi (827432) <eviNO@SPAMsmokingcube.be> on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:33PM (#30289204) Homepage

    Since they are classified as a religion (thanks to infiltration of CoS into the IRS) wouldn't his service be considered 'worship' and 'volunteering'. However it wouldn't surprise me if they actually were actually doing much worse than just killing people.

    • by poetmatt (793785) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:35PM (#30289230) Journal

      what do you mean? they already had some kind of formal document about shooting people when necessary, there isn't much more out there. CoS needs to be gone, period.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:43PM (#30289332)

        Its called audit method R2-45. Two .45 cal slugs to the chest will release the thetans inhabiting even the most infected person.

    • by asdf7890 (1518587) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:48PM (#30289400)

      Since they are classified as a religion (thanks to infiltration of CoS into the IRS) wouldn't his service be considered 'worship' and 'volunteering'. However it wouldn't surprise me if they actually were actually doing much worse than just killing people.

      It wasn't infiltration, though I'm not saying they didn't try that too. They basically said "give us religious status for tax purposes or we'll all misfile out forms and delay payments as long as possible, good luck finding the resources to pursue even a fraction of our members", and the IRS conceded that it would cost less to let them have their way than to try force them to behave.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by houstonbofh (602064)
      The key is consent... By your definition, they can make rape OK. Doesn't work for rape, and we have lots of case law supporting that. (Even if you are "married" to that 14 year old.)
    • by AioKits (1235070) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:18PM (#30289852)

      Since they are classified as a religion (thanks to infiltration of CoS into the IRS) wouldn't his service be considered 'worship' and 'volunteering'.

      Interesting point, but the document linked by Iphtashu Fitz (the complaint filed) addresses this as follows:

      The First Amendment does not exempt purported religious organizations from Minimum Wage and Child Labor Laws. Elvig v. Calvin Presbyterian Church, 397 F.3d 790, 792 (9th Cir 2003).

      Bottom of page 6, top of page 7 in the Complaint (look for Iphtashu Fitz's link further down). It also details his age at the time of said service and the extent of services rendered.

  • About damn time. (Score:4, Interesting)

    by NotBornYesterday (1093817) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:37PM (#30289250) Journal
    It looks like it's just a civil complaint, though. I'd love to see these guys brought up on criminal charges. If this suit makes any headway, I wonder if criminal charges will eventually follow? I can't imagine the DA would refuse to prosecute for slavery. It will be interesting to see what Scientology goodies come to light in the discovery process.
    • by Red Flayer (890720) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:43PM (#30289326) Journal

      I can't imagine the DA would refuse to prosecute for slavery.

      Are you kidding? What does a prosecutor have to gain from prosecuting CoS for slavery? A little publicity for prosecuting on hearsay? You think he'll get warrants to investigate the tight-as-a-witches-bum CoS? Likely to backfire.

      What do they have to lose? Credibility? Their career? Personal safety?

      • Re:About damn time. (Score:4, Informative)

        by Patch86 (1465427) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:52PM (#30289464)

        If the civil suit is successful, that implies that the plaintiff (who obviously shoulders the burden of proof) was able to convince a judge that a major American and multi-national organization illegally enslaved him in a secure compound for a decade and a half.

        The DA might take an interest considering a lot of the leg work will already have been done for them.

  • by vvaduva (859950) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:45PM (#30289364)

    I think the headline is wrong...they usually charge people for services, not vice versa! wtf?

  • FLSA (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Lord Ender (156273) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:45PM (#30289366) Homepage

    There is no law against working in a compound which has barbed wire. So that sounds like some crap to feed the media.

    The $50/week pay could be grounds for him to sue them for back wages, supposing he has proof that he worked more than 10 hours per week and that they only paid him $50 during such weeks.

    For the slavery charge, he would need to prove that he tried to quit/leave but was forcibly prevented from doing so. Did he call the police on such occasions?

    I'm thinking he may have a hard time proving his case. Accusations alone won't do it; he'll need evidence.

  • Original complaint (Score:4, Informative)

    by Iphtashu Fitz (263795) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:49PM (#30289428)

    For those of you who are interested, you can read the original court complaint filing here:

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/23175190/Complaint-filed112509 [scribd.com]

  • Ah My Homeland (Score:5, Interesting)

    by BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @05:54PM (#30289526) Homepage Journal
    As a Californian I wonder how much interest this is going to garner in my home state regarding the abuses of Scientology. On the one hand, my state is populated with pipe dreamers, smoked out idealists, flower children, hippy nutjobs, and all sorts of other forms of extreme liberalism. On the other hand, we have very rich communities like Hollywood, the OC, and Roseville. We also, apparently, have enough orthodox, classic right wingers that we voted down legalizing gay marriage recently. We have farmers. We have students. We have programmers. We have ranchers. We have movie stars. We have one of the most diverse culture mixtures in the world I bet. That's part of why I love it here...

    Of course, along with that diversity is an unfathomable tolerance for some particularly poignant cases of stupidity...like our state budget. There is no doubt that the strong and vocal religious groups here in California would raise exception and a helluva kerfuffle over their church being towed to court for slavery. But I wonder if any of those groups see a case regarding Scientology as a threat. After all sometimes the most belligerent opposition to one religion comes from another religion. I have seen folks in Fawkes masks walking around my local famer's market protesting Scientology. However, I have also had Scientologists try to recruit me both in my home town and when I wander the rest of the state. So this will certainly be an interesting case to watch. I hope it garners some attention and noise in this state and, perhaps, even in our country. Exposing Scientology for the cult and crime syndicate it is certainly is, in my opinion, a righteous cause....

    Well if there's one thing we Californians know how to do, its garner attention and make some noise. I'm gonna go pop some popcorn...
  • by Ohio Calvinist (895750) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:10PM (#30289740)
    I live near this facility (map/image [google.com]) and it looks more like a gated-resort community than anything. I haven't seen any razor wire, but there are high fences and access is controlled through a gate, and there are cameras on the road and on the fence. For the interested, there is a wiki page [wikipedia.org] that strikes me as being pretty accurate and NPOV.
  • by mlawrence (1094477) <martin@@@martinlawrence...ca> on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:15PM (#30289806) Homepage
    My parents forced me to go to church every week, then sunday school, and during the week I would be forced to work as an altar boy for no pay. All the time I was brainwashed with repetitive prayers and actions. A cult is a cult is a cult. It doesn't matter that here in North America we tend to be fond of a particular one.
    • by Literaphile (927079) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:27PM (#30290026)

      My parents forced me to go to church every week, then sunday school, and during the week I would be forced to work as an altar boy for no pay. All the time I was brainwashed with repetitive prayers and actions. A cult is a cult is a cult. It doesn't matter that here in North America we tend to be fond of a particular one.

      That's a very poor argument. You can swap out "church" for almost any other childhood activity. For example, soccer:

      My parents forced me to go to soccer every week and play a game on saturday, and during the week I would be forced to go to soccer practice for no pay. All the time I was brainwashed with repetitive stretches and drills.

      In other words, equating Sunday school and being an altar boy to doing film editing production is silly. The former are childhood activities, not jobs. But I suppose most Slashdotters take any opportunity to bash Christianity (note: I am not a Christian).

    • Yeah, my parents had me in church a lot as a kid. As an adult, I pretty much stopped going. Know what? My mom still likes me and I still have plenty of friends who go to church, and as far as I know none of them have shunned me as a pariah. I don't think you can really give a group "cult" status when there's no penalty for leaving and they're still nice to you afterward.

  • by smellsofbikes (890263) on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:20PM (#30289908) Journal
    It sounds like Lindstein was caught in the Rehabilitation Project Force [wikipedia.org] program, which is where Scientology dissidents are placed until they get better, where 'better' is defined by the people who put them there. Gold Base [wikipedia.org] is by no means the only such place people are kept: the first RPF people were on ships, cleaning out the sewage systems by hand. Sort of hard to call the police when you're being held on a ship in international waters...
  • by macraig (621737) <mark...a...craig@@@gmail...com> on Tuesday December 01, 2009 @06:44PM (#30290232)

    I once had the opportunity to read part of the diary of a teenage girl who had been at a Scientology "Base" in Colorado. I don't recall the name of it, or even whether she mentioned it by name (this was 20 years ago). The disruptive, corruptive effects her involvement with this Base and the CoS had on her state of mind were obvious from what she wrote. While I don't recall whether she described any physical enslavement, the mental enslavement was apparent.

    Why they're still getting away with it mystifies me; pretty much everyone now knows what they're doing and how they're doing it.

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