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Researchers Find Gaps In Iranian Filtering 156

Posted by Soulskill
from the gaming-the-system dept.
I Don't Believe in Imaginary Property writes "With all the turmoil and internet censorship in Iran making it difficult to get an accurate picture of what's going, security researchers have found a way to locate gaps in Iran's filtering by analyzing traffic exiting Iran. The short version is that SSH, torrents and Flash are high priorities for blocking, while game protocols like WoW and Xbox traffic are being ignored, even though they also allow communication. Hopefully, this data will help people think of new ways to bypass filtering and speak freely, even though average Iranians have worse things to worry about than internet censorship, now that the reformists have been declared anti-Islamic by the Supreme Leader. Given the circumstances, that declaration has been called 'basically a death sentence' for those who continue protesting." Reader CaroKann sends in a related story at the Washington Post about an analysis of the vote totals in the Iranian election (similar to, but different from the one we discussed earlier) in which the authors say the election results have a one in two-hundred chance of being legitimate.
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Researchers Find Gaps In Iranian Filtering

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  • by Anonymous Coward
    so does this mean i can use the port number of xboxlive and wow to send and receive data?
    • by Bigjeff5 (1143585)

      Ports are not protocols. Or, to put it in geekspeak for you, Port != Protocol. Port is short for "Communications Port", and it is required to communicate with the OS from an external source. A protocol is a standardized method of communication. For example, TCP/IP are two protocols for networking - the Transport Control Protocol and the Internet Protocol. They basically establish the pattern the ones and zeros will take when exiting your machine, so that another machine knows where the relavent data is

  • Internet filtering (Score:5, Insightful)

    by bcmm (768152) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @09:22AM (#28410107)
    The Internet is The Internet.

    Information will get from anywhere to anywhere unless Iran completely disconnects itself from the rest of the 'net. There are as many ways to hide "communications" as there are protocols and servers out there, and no one can do a bloody thing about it. Even a "whitelist" style system would have holes in.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by BeardedChimp (1416531)
      The importance is in the subtelty, "Information will get from anywhere to anywhere" should really be "Information can get from anywhere to anywhere". The internet's sophistication is such that any geek will be able to find a hole, but would some Iranian whose friend has just been shot and wants to tell the world?

      The widescale filtering may do little to deter the geeks but it has had a profound effect on the average Iranian. [arbornetworks.com] By blocking simple messaging protocols they have achieved their goal for the major
    • by shentino (1139071)
      On the other hand, bloody is about the ONLY way they can stop things.

      Now that the SL has declared the protestors anti-islamic, the police probably have the duty to KILL ON SIGHT anyone found protesting.

      Which is really sad. That means it's literally do or die for any revolution.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Now that the SL has declared the protestors anti-islamic, the police probably have the duty to KILL ON SIGHT anyone found protesting.

        I don't believe it is the police doing the killing. The killing is being done by the Basij. They're the ones who shot Neda, a young girl, supposedly only 16.. Google "Neda" if you aven't already.

        I'm seeing people on twitter suggesting that protesters carry a Koran.

    • by AmigaMMC (1103025)
      "There are as many ways to hide "communications" as there are protocols and servers out there"

      .

      Exactly! These people haven't learned anything from watching Star Trek: Voyager ? ;-)

  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday June 21, 2009 @09:22AM (#28410109)

    ... and publicly announcing this will help these gaps to stay unfiltered?

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by juenger1701 (877138)

      unfiltered: yes

      unmonitored: no

    • by bbernard (930130) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @11:19AM (#28410927)

      "and publicly announcing this will help these gaps to stay unfiltered?"

      It is in Iran's best interest to filter as little as possible. If you're a devout WoW player, they'd rather let you spend time on that, being oblivious and happy, than risk you being pissed off that you can't play. The most important thing for Iran's government to do is to try and make sure that no more people join the protests, and that those who have get discouraged by the hardship and return to their "comfortable" lives. They want people to return to "normal" even if it is just a sham because they can control the people that way. That requires people not paying attention to what the government is really doing, which requires giving people somewhere to "bury" their heads. The Internet is GREAT for that. I never found so many ways to waste my own time until I first opened that Mosaic browser one day...

      What Iran's government has been doing with regard to filtering has been disturbingly effective. Yes, the protesters are getting together and communicating with each other, but there's no reliable sources of verifiable news. No reliable death count. No clear picture of what is happening. Citizen journalism is great, but it pales in comparison with what real news-gathering resources can do. So foreign governments are limited in their response, and that response is even more limited in the audience within Iran that can see it.

      Don't discount the ability to keep information away from the militia men as well. The Iranian government is more dependent than ever on the blind faith of their security forces. They must be fed the party line, and be made to swallow it. You don't get that kind of obedience when those forces are allowed to think for themselves. So you deny them the ability to gather data to make up their own minds.

      So yes, Iran is not blocking all possible methods of communication, but they're effective enough that they still may pull this off.

      Information is power, and the information required to make your own decisions is the ultimate expression of that power.

      • by Jonboy X (319895)

        If you're a devout WoW player, they'd rather let you spend time on that, being oblivious and happy, than risk you being pissed off that you can't play.

        No WoW has ever or will ever foment a revolution.

        Prove me wrong, kids!

  • Good job (Score:3, Informative)

    by Wonko the Sane (25252) * on Sunday June 21, 2009 @09:23AM (#28410117) Journal

    Now the censors know what they are missing.

  • by erroneus (253617) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @09:25AM (#28410131) Homepage

    We pretty much know what Iran is all about. It is rather overt and obvious to most everyone. Any illusion about a democratically elected government can pretty much be put to rest. And now that they are invoking religious law (not that they haven't been all along) it is clear exactly where the source of power is. (Save the comments about the U.S. putting the Ayatolla into power, I already know.)

    But I keep asking myself, why should we care at all? Will we care and demonstrate as much as the Iranians when the next freedom eroding thing happens in the US? Will we take to the streets in protest of ACTA? Will we collectively burn our required government healthcare cards? I seriously doubt it. The government controllers in the U.S. long ago learned the secret that other governments have yet to figure out. Keep the slaves comfortable, busy and distracted, and they won't put up a fight.

    • by Colin Smith (2679) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @09:33AM (#28410169)

      Petrodollars. Iran is threatening to sell oil in Euros. If people didn't have to buy dollars in order to pay for oil, the US government couldn't create as many as it wanted, which means that the military spending would have to stop.

       

    • by batrick (1274632) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @09:33AM (#28410173)
      ... because this is an example of how censorship (of the Internet) can have dramatic effects on rebellion, revolution, and government? Nerds everywhere should be closely watching.
    • by WDot (1286728) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @09:58AM (#28410325)
      As much as I respect the Iranians who protest, what's going on in Iran is a big example of why the US may be hesitant to protest: protesting is SCARY. One of the most watched videos on Reddit recently is a gruesome video of an Iranian girl being shot to death for protesting. I think a lot of people in the US just want to be left alone by the government. Is protesting the government worth risking your neck or your job? What about your spouse and children? It's sad, but that seems to be the case.
      • by GabriellaKat (748072) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @10:18AM (#28410457)

        As much as I respect the Iranians who protest, what's going on in Iran is a big example of why the US may be hesitant to protest: protesting is SCARY. One of the most watched videos on Reddit recently is a gruesome video of an Iranian girl being shot to death for protesting. I think a lot of people in the US just want to be left alone by the government. Is protesting the government worth risking your neck or your job? What about your spouse and children? It's sad, but that seems to be the case.

        I guess too many people have forgotten KENT STATE, or don't know our history, or just don't care anymore? Those who forget history are doomed to repeat it. Those who remember now seem doomed to apathy.

        • "I guess too many people have forgotten KENT STATE "

          There are tears in my eyes as I write this; I cannot forget the look in Neda's eyes as life slipped from her 16 year old body. She wasn't protesting, she was simply standing there watching with her father when she was killed by a snipers bullet who shot her right in the heart. Sources say it was the Basij on a nearby rooftop.

          But you make a good point: people have forgotten Kent state [wikipedia.org], or rather, the memory of it is not being passed to future generations.

        • by Bigjeff5 (1143585)

          Those who forget history are doomed to repeat it.

          Indeed. And those who remember it with rose colored glasses are doomed to repeat it far more enthusiasticly than the original.

          The US Constitution guarantees the right to peaceful protests. What happened at Kent State certainly began as such, but the problem started when protesters began vandalizing cars, breaking the windows of businesses that couldn't possibly have anything to do with the war, and throwing rocks at the firefighters who arrived to put out the fires started by the protesters.

          The shootings

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by deviceb (958415)
        yes, until you are left alone.
        Neda was shot in the heart in front of her father for protesting.
        • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

          by Yogiz (1123127)

          Actually no, she wasn't protesting. She was quite far from where the active protests took place and she and his father did not participate.

      • by Ironsides (739422)
        The protests we have in the US every year would seem to contradict your theory. The most recent being the tea parties, then there are the G8 protests, NAFTA protests, the protests at the presidential political conventions... Sorry, but the US has protests all the time.
      • by thesandbender (911391) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @10:30AM (#28410563)
        I'm guessing you've never lived in D.C. or New York were protests are common things. Among the dozens or hundreds a year, there's at least one protest against the NYPD for a shooting, rape, etc. That puts the protesters directly up against the people they're protesting against. And a lot of these are a few dozen people but some are large, loud and pissed. There was a police shooting in NYC a few years ago and Jesse Jackson lead a march on City Hall. The crowd was loud enough I could hear them through a closed office door on the twentieth floor.

        Actually just look back at the 2000 presidential election, there was a lot of protesting against the results in Florida... across the country. The tea parties earlier this year were protests.

        So yes... US citizens can and do protest. Thankfully we live in a country where that usually doesn't lead to bloodshed... but even that has happened on very rare occasion. Complete with pictures of people being shot and dying. [wikipedia.org]
    • by guyminuslife (1349809) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @10:03AM (#28410363)

      I don't know, maybe because some of us care about other people, and their rights, no matter where they are in the world. Maybe not everyone's a cynic all the time.

    • by Swizec (978239)

      Keep the slaves comfortable, busy and distracted, and they won't put up a fight.

      Oh you mean like we've done here in Europe since the times of ancient Rome when they invented the bread-and-games (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bread_and_circuses) doctrine? Well sometimes even that can only go so far, as shown by countless revolutions in the past. You can keep them fed and you can keep them entertained, but at some point, they will get bored of you and throw a revolution. Then said revolution counts as entertainment until the new (or old) government is well settled and finds some new sand

      • by erroneus (253617)

        On one side of the world, we have death and destruction caused by actions by the US government, on the other side of the world, Britney Spears shaves her head and shows her twat. Guess what people are talking about?

    • But I keep asking myself, why should we care at all?

      We will care as long as we're too stupid to develop all of our own energy sources and remain frighteningly dependent on the rest of the world.

      DRILL HERE - DRILL NOW!

    • The government controllers in the U.S. long ago learned the secret that other governments have yet to figure out. Keep the slaves comfortable, busy and distracted, and they won't put up a fight.

      You're saying if you keep people happy they won't complain, but you present it as though that's a bad thing.

      What gives?

    • by hxnwix (652290)

      Will we collectively burn our required government healthcare cards?

      *smirk*

      Just like we burn our required government schools, required government roads, required government FDA... Have you suffered severe cranial trauma recently? Might want to have that checked out.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    First they tried with war. Now they are trying to bring down the government. The oposition is a puppet of USA. The elections were valid. The protests are initiated by CIA and the news coverage is unfair. And, besides, we don't really care what happens to Iran and whether the USA appointed president will finally manage to take over Iran and make it McDonalds country. Really, if we cared we'd visit CNN.com or something.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Jonas Buyl (1425319)

      First they tried with war. Now they are trying to bring down the government. The oposition is a puppet of USA. The elections were valid. The protests are initiated by CIA and the news coverage is unfair. And, besides, we don't really care what happens to Iran and whether the USA appointed president will finally manage to take over Iran and make it McDonalds country. Really, if we cared we'd visit CNN.com or something.

      Mahmoud! You here! How are things?

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Verteiron (224042)

      Do you really, honestly believe the CIA is competent enough to organize a nation-wide rebellion?

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Jonas Buyl (1425319)
      Hmm. I wonder what's more likely, a corrupt regime where the most influential leader is the highest religious authority as well or a government led by a democratically elected president.
  • nomoreiranplease? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by wigaloo (897600) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @09:52AM (#28410269)

    It is hard to fathom how the story of the year (also the tech story of the year) could be tagged "nomoreiranplease". Tech has played a critical role in this event. Who ever thought that twitter could actually be useful? The diaspora of communications technologies has proved very hard to shut down, and it will be interesting to see what new communications tech adds to this in the future.

    One issue this brings up is the differences between the fark [fark.com] free-for-all comment system (including images!) versus slashdot's moderation. The contribution of fark to reporting what has been going on in Iran has been really impressive, and fark is essentially a news aggregator just like slashdot. Does the moderation system of slashdot prevent a similar thing from happening here? I had hoped to see a much more vigorous discussion from the slashdot community, but the real action is elsewhere. Part of this is due to the moderation system, I think, which effectively forces an end to conversations when the mods run out.

    I'm not trying to be trollish, but think this is an interesting thing to think about. Slashdot used to feel like the center of the tech universe, but has been badly outdone on this topic by fark and others.

    • "The" story of the year? To whom? Tech has played a critical role in this event? Well, why hasn't the government been overthrown yet? It's certainly not due to lack of IT support. Did they have computers in the 1979 overthrow?

      Please re-evaluate your web-centric thinking. You know that something like 95% of fark.com users never even click on the comments, much less ever post one? It's a big circle jerk. The focus seems to be on self-congratulation and providing trivial services rather than any actual

      • Re:nomoreiranplease? (Score:4, Interesting)

        by wigaloo (897600) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @12:12PM (#28411281)

        Wow, you need to pay closer attention. Start with this Iran Update [google.com] from Fark user Tatsuma, which has been gleaned (or so I understand) from reliable twitter sources on the ground in Iran. Very little of this information is coming out in the mainstream media. Other places like 4chan have been very active in setting up proxies to get the information out. This is a very important world and tech development.

        Remember that this event is only a week old. The objective should not be to have a repeat of the bloody events of 1979, which is what you get when the situation evolves too rapidly.

        • Re:nomoreiranplease? (Score:4, Interesting)

          by Artifakt (700173) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @01:40PM (#28411955)

          While we're at it, you could check out the Project for the Old American Century site, (http://www.oldamericancentury.org/)
          Which is currently devoting itself covering to the Iran mess to the extent that they have renamed themselves the "Project for the Old Persian Century" on their masthead. Half the Reddit politics links they pass on seem to be devoted to Iran today.

                Normally, I do Slashdot instead of Fark or Reddit because the mod system here actually seems to reduce the turkey level - in particular, Reddit has a bunch of 'Atheists' (who may just be posturing as part of a mass trolling) who have vowed to make all the other sections 'officially Atheists Only', and 'ruthlessly suppress all religious speech' (that's their phrases, not mine). there are probably at least 50 accounts involved, something I've never seen anything close to here. In fact, finding something like that on Slashdot would probably mean a GNAA post and 10 "me too"s, all remorselessly modded up to +5 and kept there for days, by literally dozens of throw away accounts. If someone wants to try that hard here, they'll just be setting a new mark for pathetic losers everywhere. In that sense, Slashdot's mod system works well.

                But what I'm seeing there today is that on an important news issue, there are enough thousands of people responding that trolls like that are completely drowned out, or have enough sense to stay out of the way. The information level has gone high, there's a lot of thoughtful, reasoned posting, and it's obvious that some people will be taking what they are learning in the discussion into account when it comes time to vote or contribute to political causes. On this issue, both Fark and Reddit are having real impact. maybe some of that's happening here too, but it's less obvious.

        • Wow, a blogger scouring twitter for the latest updates. Yeah. That will surely be the straw that breaks the camel's back. The government of the Islamic Republic of Iran will topple as soon as word of this gets out. Because it's hearsay from sources on the ground.

          This is a very important world and tech development.
          See, my point exactly. It's important for self-important douchebags - it's actually not very important for the people on the ground in Iran. Heat is not the same as light. Fashionable ca

          • by wigaloo (897600)

            Nice straw man you've got yourself there. I never claimed that twittering would topple the Iranian government. The key role that the Internet has played in all this is in getting the information out where the traditional media have failed, and that is what makes it an important tech story. Insofar as peace is based on communication, these are important developments. As I noted in an earlier post, one gets the sense that more of us understand the people of Iran now than ever before. Although we are diffe

      • by rs79 (71822)

        "The" story of the year? To whom? Tech has played a critical role in this event? Well, why hasn't the government been overthrown yet? It's certainly not due to lack of IT support. Did they have computers in the 1979 overthrow? "

        Short answer: No. Nobody did.

        That's not entirely accurate, but you had to have shelled out multiples of 10K checks to get a PDP 11 or similar. Waterloo had one 11/45 (sold to them by my co-worker, Ted Thorpe) that Dave Conroy wrote what is now "gcc" on because he wanted C for the RS

    • by EQ (28372) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @12:12PM (#28411279) Homepage Journal
      We do need more coverage of Iran, especially from a technical standpoint. First of all, it will help us know how to best help those putting their lives on the line for liberty against a totalitarian force. Secondly, it will give those of use interested in the tech side ("news for Nerds", remember?) insight into how these can best be used to avoid censorship and repression, no matter what the source. Its a good enough rationale to provide extensive coverage here daily -- after all, how many times do you get to see a live, full scale example of censors versus leakers?

      As for why the tag nomoreiran Its pretty simple. /. used to be very "techno-libertarian" in slant, way back when. It is not such a place anymore.

      Rob ("Taco") and cronies (e.g. kdawson, whom I view as being irredeemably as slanted as Rush Limbaugh, just in opposite directions) have become more collectivist and pointedly anti-conservative at the expense of libertarianism (mainly by being unthinkingly knee-jerk anti-Bush, instead of well reasoned critics). Thus any political action that does not actively help their flavor of collectivism/statism or something that casts a negative light on their political favorites (i.e. Obama, liberals, socialists, etc) will receive less attention, editorially speaking. Its their own personal bias, as reflected in editorial choices of what to cover and what to try to ignore. I cannot blame them much -- the slashdot userbase has become filled with unreasoning collectivist (non-technical) poseurs, so Taco and company are just following their audience (and the money). Sadly, this means that the epithet SlashKosisn't all that far from the mark anymore.

      Its not a troll or flamebait to say so (take a moment to read the actual definitions before you politically mod this post). Its just my observation. One needs a heavy set of "bogus-ness/BS" filters to get any real data out of most articles here anymore, and in general I tend to avoid most "YRO" category articles because they are simply editorials with no pretense of actually presenting any logic examination (and a proper debunking) of opposing views. I do value the book reviews and some of the limited Tech news that manages to make it past the slant here. And some of the humor here is still pretty good.

      Still, it would be nice to see more information/articles on Slashdot about how tech is being used to fight what is probably one of the most evil regimes on the planet - and the religious and state mechanisms it uses to maintain its tyranny. Those "resistance" methods might come in hand in other places as well, like China, Britain and the USA, sooner than we think.
      • What a wonderful troll. So, according to you, only those who are against the evils "Obama, liberals, socialists" - that is, the proud U.S. Republicans and conservatives - support the Iranian democratic revolution, and promote it on the Net?

        It's also interesting how you lump together "technical" and "libertarian", and then go on together and say that "collectivist" means "non-technical".

        If that post don't deserve Troll and/or Flamebait, then I don't know what does.

        • by EQ (28372)
          Where did I say "Republican" and "conservative" as positives in my post? Hmm? Try reading it instead of projecting your blinkered political rage onto it.

          If you actually bothered to read it, you'd see my post was about the left (liberals. Obama) being as bad as the right (Bush, conservatives) at demonizing their opponent and being unthinkingly negative instead of trying to look at facts (And there are, as I pointed out, plenty of factual and reasonable ways to criticize Bush, which many here seem to igno
  • by GabriellaKat (748072) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @10:10AM (#28410405)
    I dont know about anyone else, but reading the tag of "NOMOREIRANPLEASE" Even if you have mixed feelings about Iran and their relationship with the US / World, there is no reason to flag a topic with such a tag line.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by selven (1556643)
      We need people to start tagging things "nomoreriaaplease", "nomorepiratepartyplease" or even "nomorelinuxplease"? All those have been around a lot longer, let us have something fresh to discuss for a short period of time.
  • setup tor bridges (Score:4, Informative)

    by deviceb (958415) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @10:15AM (#28410433) Homepage
    search #iranelection or #neda on twitterfall.com
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Isn't this worse than what the US want McKinnon arrested for under terrorism charges?

    Isn't this the same as the hacking the Chinese are accused of doing to the US computer systems?

    If so, why is this OK when the others aren't?

    • by Dachannien (617929) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @10:47AM (#28410673)

      Here, let me set that straw man on fire for you:

      No and no. Both of those situations involve someone gaining access to computer systems, where the owners of those systems don't want that someone to have access.

      With the Iran situation, there are people trying to gain access to computer systems, where a third party doesn't want them to have access. To the contrary, the owners of Twitter, YouTube, and other services have been extremely supportive of the efforts of Iranians to spread the word of how the government has imported plainclothes thugs from other countries to come in and brutalize innocent people in the streets.

  • by Thrakkerzog (7580) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @10:26AM (#28410509)

    and when they shut down WoW, we will have a true revolution.

  • by arash_hemmat (1574901) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @10:29AM (#28410549)
    Hi, I'm an Iranian and i've been tortured by the internet filtering here for a few years but the filtering after election is really terrible, we can't use the old ssh tunneling methods any more, in fact it seems that all encrypted packages are being dropped so we can't connect to our servers out side of Iran any more so we can't use another method for passing through the filtering, however today i've used a browser based ssh client to connect to my VPS in Germany and installed a proxy using squid but the interesting thing is that we i try to connect to facebook (or any other filtered website) the firewall changes my request to the famous "This site is blocked" page! These things was just examples of methods we tried to pass the filtering, anyway we are using other method to pass the filtering (which i will not mention here for safety!) but we have serious problems connecting to our servers over ssh, i'm going to test the ssh over http method but i know that this will be a temporary method!!!
  • "Hopefully, this data will help people think of new ways to bypass filtering and speak freely"

    On the contrary, now that it's public information this "security gap" has probably already been dealt with by the authorities.

  • Moreiranplease (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    You know what? This should be a tag on every story if we really mean it.

  • They are probably responsible for a huge part of the Iranian exports.

    /s
  • by Anonymous Coward

    post a news article on /. such that it draws traffic into your network

    voila! instant censorship

    all hale the supreme leader CowboyNeal!

  • by Coutal (98822) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @11:06AM (#28410809)

    According to this: http://opennet.net/research/profiles/iran
    Nokia/siemens sold filtering software to iran, quite the nefarious thing to do, perhaps even bypassing some boycott agreements and US export regulations, if containing any US code. now's the time to make them disclose what sofware they sold, and everything they know about the filtering system. a lot of lives are at stake, now's the time.
    if any nokia/siemens employees are reading this, pass this on!

  • I find it both sad and disheartening that the US is more up-in-arms about these election results in a foreign land, than they were about our own EXTREMELY questionable election results here in the US in the year 2000. As time goes on we find more and more discrepancies in those results, and nobody seems to gives a damn. A 1 in 200 chance of the election results in Iran seems far, far more likely than what happened here.
  • by Nom du Keyboard (633989) on Sunday June 21, 2009 @03:12PM (#28412677)
    This morning I've been watching clips "smuggled out" via posting onto YouTube.

    It's axiomatic that if you know about YouTube and can post to YouTube that you can also view YouTube. And if you're viewing YouTube then you seeing a rest of the world that is a whole lot more fun than the hell hole you're stuck in at the moment. Of course the young college students fueling the protests would like their lives to be a bit more free than what they've been forced to live under -- especially the women!

    So just how is that Sharia Law working out for you?

    Say what you want about the decadent west, but nobody is about to show up at my door and beat me senseless for posting this.
    • by rs79 (71822)

      "Say what you want about the decadent west, but nobody is about to show up at my door and beat me senseless for posting this. "

      Not without your address anyway :-)

  • IP over WOW dance movements....

  • by Un pobre guey (593801) on Monday June 22, 2009 @12:53AM (#28416921) Homepage
    Not so fast. The Iranian authorities are shutting off as many of these tools as possible, as well as using the good old fashioned technique of simply imprisoning the sources. For example Amir Sadeghi, the brave photojournalist who runs the http://tehranlive.org/ [tehranlive.org] blog, has gone missing. Also, just plain shooting protesters down in the street [youtube.com] has evidently not lost its appeal. The net provides new and revolutionary tools of communication, but brutal dictatorships are still able to leverage their tried and true techniques.

    The "Islamic Republic" has lasted longer than the Shah, and has clearly shown that religious oligarchies are every bit as corrupt, barbaric, and secretive as secular ones.

    I hope the people of Iran are able to free themselves of dictatorship soon.

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