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Swedish ISP Deletes Customer ID Info 177

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the putting-tread-on-the-slippery-slope dept.
NewYorkCountryLawyer writes "A Swedish internet service provider, Bahnhof, has begun deleting customer identification information in order to prevent it from being used as evidence against its customers under Sweden's new legislation against copyright infringement via peer-to-peer file sharing. According to this report on 'The Local,' it is entirely legal for it to do so. The company's CEO, Jon Karlung, is identified as 'a vociferous opponent of the measures that came into force on April 1st,' and is quoted saying that he is determined to protect the company's clients, and that 'It's about the freedom to choose, and the law makes it possible to retain details. We're not acting in breach of IPRED; we're following the law and choosing to destroy the details.'"
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Swedish ISP Deletes Customer ID Info

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  • by Dan667 (564390) on Friday April 17, 2009 @01:01PM (#27615913)
    They take care of their customers and can still run after a nuclear war. (and you know some guy in there is doing the maniacal laugh every once in a while) http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2009/04/15/inside-the-james-bond-villain-data-center/ [datacenterknowledge.com]
  • by vivaoporto (1064484) on Friday April 17, 2009 @01:01PM (#27615915)
    Judging by the recent trial of TPB, following the letter of the law in Sweden is not enough to defend yourself if the case ends up in court.
  • by AmiMoJo (196126) <mojo AT world3 DOT net> on Friday April 17, 2009 @01:24PM (#27616449) Homepage

    Deleting all non-essential personal data sounds like a good way to limit the possibility of having the data stolen and used for identity fraud. That sounds like a pretty compelling argument.

    In fact, here in the UK, data protection laws require each piece of information kept to be justified. If they rules on justification were tightened up...

    I'd love to know how they can bill people without even knowing their name though. It would seem to rule out credit cards.

  • by avicarmi (582269) on Friday April 17, 2009 @01:26PM (#27616503) Homepage Journal
    A neat video tour of the "james bond villain data center": http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2009/04/15/inside-the-james-bond-villain-data-center/ [datacenterknowledge.com]
  • Re:Wow (Score:5, Interesting)

    by J Isaksson (721660) on Friday April 17, 2009 @01:35PM (#27616679)
    I don't actually fileshare, but Bahnhof, you have my support and the day you support e-faktura (electronic bills & payment) I'll support you with my business too. /Actual Swede
  • Re:Wow (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Samschnooks (1415697) on Friday April 17, 2009 @01:49PM (#27616911)

    While I love this decision also, I find it sad that we now applaud people who want to take care of their customers... Didn't that used to be a given?

    Speaking as someone that handles consumer's problems - you are correct. There's nothing I hate more than hearing "Sorry for your inconvenience." - especially from airline employees!

    Oh yeah! How about, the next time you're on strike and bitching about how you're not making enough, I walk up to you and say, "Sorry about the inconvenience!"

    Here's the thing, with this shitty economy, companies are seeing the light! Amen! They're paying attention to customers. Just walk into a Home Depot now. I got asked 4 times if I found what I'm looking for! Now, they're pissing me off for being so helpful. Talk about the pendulum swinging!

    P.S. To you Aladrin: I see that big orange ball by your userID. For what it's worth, whatever I said, I meant nothing personal, but I stand by my opinions. I take responsibility for what I've said that has offended you. Judge me as you will.

  • by Kjella (173770) on Friday April 17, 2009 @01:53PM (#27616983) Homepage

    I'd love to know how they can bill people without even knowing their name though. It would seem to rule out credit cards.

    Provide service but don't keep DHCP logs? Pretty much all broadband in Sweden is unmetered, so there's no need to keep any traffic details at all.

  • Re:Wow (Score:2, Interesting)

    by prozaker (1261190) on Friday April 17, 2009 @02:01PM (#27617129)
    truth.
    that move will prolly get his ISP more customers, and if more customers = more moneys .

    ez

    1. destroy customer information
    2. get more customers signed up because of that.
    3. ???
    4. Profit
  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 17, 2009 @02:06PM (#27617239)

    Here in the UK, data protection laws require each piece of information kept to be justified.

    But data retention laws require each piece of information to be kept.

    Guess which one the government enforces more rigorously? Our country is fucking awful.

  • by TrevorB (57780) on Friday April 17, 2009 @02:12PM (#27617379) Homepage

    US Libraries started doing something similar after the passing of the Patriot Act: deleting customer's borrowing history so that their information couldn't be subpoenaed for the data by the government.

  • Re:I hope... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) on Friday April 17, 2009 @02:24PM (#27617567)

    I hope this won't be like what happens in the US where the company deletes data, but when pressured by the courts, they happen to recover a backup.

    It's worked out GREAT for libraries in the US. The PATRIOT act requires that libraries give up book borrowing records without even a warrant. So within a year or two pretty much all of the common library management software packages were updated to delete all record of who/where/when/what was borrowed as soon as the book is returned. Few people would ever guess it, but most librarians are almost militant about patron privacy.

  • Re:Wow (Score:5, Interesting)

    by PopeRatzo (965947) * on Friday April 17, 2009 @03:00PM (#27618189) Homepage Journal

    I hope all the teabaggers who were at the big Fox News Tea Bag Rallies here in the US on Wednesday take note that this head of a company who is striking a blow for the privacy of his customers and liberty in general is acting in what they deridingly refer to as a "European Socialist" country.

    If this is European Socialism, I want some of that right here in America and the sooner the better.

    What was the last time an American CEO did something like this for his customers?

  • Re:Wow (Score:5, Interesting)

    by PopeRatzo (965947) * on Friday April 17, 2009 @03:11PM (#27618347) Homepage Journal

    the other kind that shows up with as a band of thugs bearing guns and badges

    At least here in the US, our corporations are not afraid of "thugs bearing guns and badges" because they are paying those thugs.

    That's the modern-day equivalent of when a US governor would send out National Guard troops to kill striking coal miners and their families.

    We should never forget that the people who fought and died to create the labor union movement in this country were every bit heroes as the men who stormed Normandy.

    We may be about to find out what it's like to live under the thumb of corporate fascists and their puppets in government.

  • Re:Wow (Score:3, Interesting)

    by frank_adrian314159 (469671) on Friday April 17, 2009 @04:09PM (#27619183) Homepage

    We may be about to find out what it's like to live under the thumb of corporate fascists and their puppets in government.

    About to?

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