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China to Regulate Internet Map Publishing 279

Posted by timothy
from the emblematic dept.
hackingbear writes "After text, pictures, and videos, China starts regulating Internet map publishing (here is the google translation.) The government believes that Internet maps can represent the state's sovereignty and its political and diplomatic positions in the international community — and consequently, inaccurate maps could harm national interests and dignity, produce bad political influences, reveal national secrets and harm national security, in addition to harming consumer interests. So from now on, publishing maps would require approval and (yet another) license from the state survey bureau. That means Google, Yahoo, etc., need to remove China from the map; or maybe they just pay up some officials and their agents to acquire yet another license. And our newest 80Gbps DPI monsters need to be upgraded to identify maps together with porn."
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China to Regulate Internet Map Publishing

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  • by Anonymous Coward
    priceless!
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      Alternatively, Google et al could highlight Tibet (imperial pink, perhaps?) and tell Hu Da Fuk and all his friends where to get off.

      Anyone who even slightly agrees with this measure is a pawn of the fascists, and would be better off sharing a forum with Gordon Brown and Georgie boy.

      • by cayenne8 (626475) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:27AM (#23390842) Homepage Journal
        I know China is potentially representing a LOT of money. But, at some point, don't we just say "Fuck China"...and all the rules and regulations and monitoring they are wanting to impose on a system that has worked just fine without them for decades?

        If they want to wall off themselves from the world, then let them. If they don't want to use what a company from another country is doing, fine just block it if you want to (or can) but, quit bitching about everything we free people do outside your fucking borders.

        • by denis-The-menace (471988) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:45AM (#23391024)
          They want to kinda wall themselves from the world but still be part of it.

          If we had governments representing people, then the UN would would have told China to where to go a long time ago and China would have become something Cuba could laugh at.

          But instead, we have governments representing corporations. (we elect them but the corps control them) To ignore china because of their fascist ways is not good for the corporate bottom line and the CEO's annual bonus. So the corps will bend and jump through hoops until they control China as well. When that happens, we will have become Star Trek's Ferengi race. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferengi)
          • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

            by OeLeWaPpErKe (412765)
            Oh it's all a large conspiracy. And by whom ? Let's see the jews, weapons merchants ... no ... capitalists, corporations AHA.

            Obviously the corporations remain nameless and there are no people involved, at all. Once I point out the people you will start decrying their evil intentions and your purity. Great. We'll get nowhere.

            How about instead of blaming "corporations"* (why not "the devil" ? I like the devil. I think we should mention him more often) we start looking at the reality.

            China has resources we nee
            • by cayenne8 (626475) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @12:21PM (#23392772) Homepage Journal
              "China has resources we need if we are to have the standard if living "we" want. (and by we I mean first and foremost you and myself)"

              Actually, they (along with India) are rapidly sucking up resources we need...mainly, oil.

              We are having to compete with them on this, and I think this will soon get nasty. China holds so much of our debt (US), that they will likely start using this as leverage against us in oil concerns.

              Frankly, I'd like to get off China's 'teet' with regard to the resources I think you're alluding to...cheap labor.

              I'm quite worried about not having any more manufacturing in the US any longer. That is a national security issues if I've ever heard one. It matters not if we have all the energy needs we need...if our suppliers of goods cut us off...we're toast.

              As another poster mentioned...I'd gladly start paying 10%-20% more for most of my goods if they were made/raised in the US. I'd much rather pay a bit of a premium to support the local manufacturer and local food grower. I'm lucky that I live in LA, where we get such an abundance of fresh seafood from the Gulf....but, when I travel the US, I'm shocked to see how muchh seafood and other animal protein foods are coming in from China, or other countries, rather than our own, where we often have higher quality, and regulations on anti-biotics, drugs and pesticides that can be used.

              But...that's a whole other rant....

        • by gnick (1211984) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:45AM (#23391034) Homepage

          ...quit bitching about everything we free people do outside your fucking borders.
          I don't remotely support the way China's oppressing their people, but criticizing this move as "outside your fucking borders" is off-base. They're restricting what comes into their country, just like almost every country in the world does. If you live somewhere with no copyright laws, start hosting movies that can be downloaded in the U.S. and see if it goes ignored. The only difference is that China is even more oppressive and aggressive than the MPAA and their goal is to enslave their citizens, not just suck them dry.
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by DM9290 (797337)

            their goal is to enslave their citizens, not just suck them dry.

            because citizens with no property still have rights in this society? Like what? The right to spend every waking hour searching for a new boss until they starve to death?

            Poverty and slavery are effectively the same thing, except the slave tends to be better off because he's valuable property and thus can't simply be left to die even if he becomes temporarily redundant. On the otherhand the temporarily redundant laborer in a society without slavery is for all free market purposes, worthless. He can't buy an

            • by gnick (1211984)

              because citizens with no property still have rights in this society? Like what?

              Two quick examples:
              1) I can get on slashdot and say "Fuck the MPAA" without fear of being snatched away in the middle of the night.
              2) If the MPAA wants to mess with me, they have to go through due process of law. Sure, the laws & courts are imperfect and lean toward the rich, but it beats the hell out of what China's got.

              Suggesting that American big business is as oppressive as China's government is pretty fucking shallow...

            • by ScentCone (795499)
              I'm not advocating slavery, I'm just saying true free market capitalism is no better.

              What are you talking about? Your social safety net programs are actually the guy without a jog making a slave of me. I'm forced (on penalty of losing my liberty by going to jail) to write a check that's used, in part, to feed him.

              Why does he have no job, and no prospect of getting one? Because he's been raised in a culture that tells him it's OK not to prepare for that possibility. You make it sound like the economy i
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by postbigbang (761081)
          The Chinese, like the Americans, have sovereignity over their borders. That Americans (I'm one) wait for the Google truck to moon it and don't care, they also present images that are sometimes not very pretty.

          US freedom and liberty gives the Google video truck the right to drive down any public byway and video what they see, 24/7. Other countries can alter what they want the truck to do, and what is public versus private versus secret information at their will.

          If mapping is good, then it won't take long bef
        • by zappepcs (820751) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @10:10AM (#23391304) Journal
          Except, there is possibly different ways to say 'Fuck China':

          1) Publish and push data all the way into their living rooms until they cut off the Internet for their people completely.

          2) Publish in a flippant way: publish maps but when it comes to China put a graphic that says sensored by assholes in China.

          3) Publish a website that shows ALL the stuff that China does not want their citizens to see/read/hear so that the entire rest of the world can see/read/hear it and know what Chinese government types have censored from their own people.

          4) invite the Chinese government to come make the rest of the world sensor material for their benefit. I'm not saying war is good, but if you intend to tell them to fuck off they will either hide behind the wall or respond to that message.

          Personally, I believe that no one should be buying ANYTHING made in China. Yes, I know it's next to impossible but I would spend an extra 10% to support companies from my country that make competing products to Chinese products.

          The entire China issue is completely out of hand, and the best way IMO to stop it is to stop dealing with them. Stop buying from them. Stop selling to them. Do not go to the Olympics either. Don't watch the Olympics. In fact, I say we censor China altogether from the world's information, business dealings etc. Don't let them invest in anything anywhere else in the world. Lock up their assets that reside outside of China, close their Embassies... everything.

          Yes, that will eventually hurt their people but it is their people that must overthrow the government in charge at this point.
          • So let me get this straight. Your idea of promoting an encouraging openness (which you and I agree is a good thing) is by completely shutting down China.

            That doesn't make much sense to me. I think if you spent even 20 minutes reading about Chinese history in the last century you would be far less ignorant of world affairs and specifically Chinese affairs. I am in no way defending totalitarianism or censorship. I just want to point out how rediculous your "solution" sounds.

            If you actually load up wikipedia a
            • by zappepcs (820751)
              The spirit of my post is not completely in disagreement with your feelings, however there is not much that can be said in reply to your post due to your lack of solutions that avoid the issues I tried to highlight.

              Basically, the two schools of thought there seem to be 'take it up the ass' to support the Chinese people or directly confront the Chinese government in some fashion. I'm going to stick my neck out and suggest that we not use the same diplomacy with China that the USA did with Iraq.

              So, for all you
              • by enjahova (812395)
                My suggestion is to increase communication. Just like in chemistry you speed up a reaction by increasing surface area. I think a solution is to not look at the world in black and white, to see the Chinese people are different from their government. I think the real way to further noble goals such as freedom is to educate people.
                When Google or anyone else censors, true they are hurting the world, Chinese and Americans alike. But this "evil" is a compromise which allows them to bring more and different knowle
                • by zappepcs (820751)
                  You and many in similar situations are well positioned to help the world understand how best we can continue to push information out there for the Chinese people and to help erode the bonds placed on them by their government. Perhaps you will find such information and blogg about it so that all of /. can read more?
                • I agree that communication should be encouraged, but I wouldn't self-censor. Thus, I run a freenet node. We should deal with china if we don't censor our stuff, if they want us to censor or leave we should leave.
          • Yes, that will eventually hurt their people but it is their people that must overthrow the government in charge at this point.
            I've said this before and I'll say it again: you have no right to demand the people of another country to give their lives for a cause that you believe in.

            And allow me to ask, what has China done to you that makes you so eager to "fuck" them? Besides having some policies that you don't agree with inside their own borders?
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by cyfer2000 (548592)

            Except, there is possibly different ways to say 'Fuck China': 1) Publish and push data all the way into their living rooms until they cut off the Internet for their people completely.

            By spamming?

            2) Publish in a flippant way: publish maps but when it comes to China put a graphic that says sensored by assholes in China.

            Are you sure Chinese care about your content? Remember, you must publish it in Chinese.

            3) Publish a website that shows ALL the stuff that China does not want their citizens to see/read/hear so that the entire rest of the world can see/read/hear it and know what Chinese government types have censored from their own people.

            Are you sure Chinese care?

            4) invite the Chinese government to come make the rest of the world sensor material for their benefit. I'm not saying war is good, but if you intend to tell them to fuck off they will either hide behind the wall or respond to that message.

            Are you sure they care?

            Personally, I believe that no one should be buying ANYTHING made in China. Yes, I know it's next to impossible but I would spend an extra 10% to support companies from my country that make competing products to Chinese products.

            Go ahead.

            The entire China issue is completely out of hand, and the best way IMO to stop it is to stop dealing with them. Stop buying from them. Stop selling to them. Do not go to the Olympics either. Don't watch the Olympics. In fact, I say we censor China altogether from the world's information, business dealings etc. Don't let them invest in anything anywhere else in the world. Lock up their assets that reside outside of China, close their Embassies... everything.

            Wet dreams. This never worked on a country with more than 1 billion people. BTW, do you ever realize how much US assets in China?

            Yes, that will eventually hurt their people but it is their people that must overthrow the government in charge at this point.

            You are very smart at this point, but if their people rise up and overthrow your government...

            BTW, when you guys are discussing wet dreams, Chinese are fighting a fscking earth quake, I hope you realiz

        • by popmaker (570147)
          Yes indeed "fuck China". It seems they are just testing how far they can push. They already got google to censor some of it's content inside China (right?) and now they want more. In the end they won't be leaving many alternatives than for the rest of the world to tell them to suck it.

          Are they looking for a reason for war or something?

          Well, ok, no reason to get carried away. Still, this is too much to ask for.
        • quit bitching about everything we free people do outside your fucking borders.
          You obviously missed the irony of this one.

          Spelling it out spoils the fun though: A slashdotter, outside China, bitching about everything the Chinese people do inside their borders (and outside said slashdotter's borders).
        • by Ihmhi (1206036)

          If they want to wall off themselves from the world, then let them.

          Right, isolationism worked out real well for Japan when Perry showed up with his ships...

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Gerald (9696)
      My first thought wasn't priceless. It was "eeewwwww!" I have no idea what an entire nation might secrete, and I don't want to know.
    • by HTH NE1 (675604)
      They can no longer sit back and allow Democratic infiltration, Democratic indoctrination, Democratic subversion and the international Democratic conspiracy to sap and impurify all of their precious bodily fluids.
  • Can they do this? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by SimonGhent (57578)

    So from now on, publishing maps would require approval and (yet another) license from the state survey bureau


    Can a country do this? Why are on-line maps different from printed maps? Seems a bit unlikely to me.

    inaccurate maps could harm national interests and dignity


    As Google maps are satellite based, how inaccurate can they be?
    • by Serapth (643581) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:17AM (#23390708)
      Can a country do this?

      Well, considering the Dick Cheney had his house obscured... I suppose the answer is yes. Actually with Google maps the US government has a number of areas blacked out for security reasons.
      • by junglee_iitk (651040) * on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:21AM (#23390762)
        Actually, it was possible in US because Google is US based.

        China will be able to pull this off only because Google wants to do business there.

        Let this be a reason for those who talk about "do no evil" and "Google" in same sentence (except me :) ), as if it is some person and not a corporation whose only thing they are looking for is more money for their shareholders.
      • by Alzheimers (467217) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:46AM (#23391056)
        considering the Dick Cheney had his house

        I think you either left out a word or a comma.
      • by omeomi (675045)
        Well, considering the Dick Cheney had his house obscured... I suppose the answer is yes.

        Unlike secret military bases and such, I don't think Dick Cheney's house was obscured because of any legal reasoning. My guess is that Google went along with obscuring it either out of an implied threat threat that they didn't want to bother wrestling with or just as a favor to the VP.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      As Google maps are satellite based, how inaccurate can they be?
      That depends on whose satellite they got the data from. ;)
      • how inaccurate can they be?
        If China thinks that Tibet is part of China, I don't think the best satellite data in the world will make the map any more "accurate" in China's view.
    • by Deadstick (535032) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:20AM (#23390748)
      As Google maps are satellite based, how inaccurate can they be?

      The borders go onto the map after the satellite takes the picture. Like, say, the border between China and Tibet.

      rj

      • Tibet has always been part of China. Just as Oceania has always been at war with Eastasia.
        • How ironic, given that there really is no border. Tibet is not an occupied country, it was conquered and annexed. Thus, no border. Anyone who insists there is a border is the one suffering from a 1984-like denial of reality.
          • by MightyYar (622222)
            And Taiwan?
            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              Taiwan is obviously a de facto sovereign state. Beijing only exerts influence over Taiwain in the same way that they exert influence over any other country, i.e. by diplomacy, trade, and warfare. Thus the nutbars in the PRC government which insist that Taiwain is part of their country are just as deluded as anyone who claims that a border exists between Tibet and China.
      • Which is why I'd like every country to paint a border around itself to be visible from space; bright fluorescent yellow lines---a mile wide or so.
    • by querist (97166) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:20AM (#23390752) Homepage
      I do not believe the satellite based images are the main issue here.

      The Chinese government objects to maps that depict certain regions as being separate sovereign countries, such as Tibet and Taiwan, which the Chinese government holds are both part of China.

      This would be similar to a map being published that showed Alaska as a separate country, or as part of Canada, as opposed to it being part of the USA.
      • by 1u3hr (530656)
        The Chinese government objects to maps that depict certain regions as being separate sovereign countries, such as Tibet and Taiwan, which the Chinese government holds are both part of China.

        And even more sensitively, areas whose sovereignty is disputed with neighbouring countries. There are border disputes, small and large, with Vietnam, Nepal, Russia. Several island groups in the South China Sea (the Spratlys, eg) are claimed by China, and several other countries. Most are uninhabited but would allow a c

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by gstoddart (321705)

      As Google maps are satellite based, how inaccurate can they be?

      Oh, they show an accurate picture of the geography.

      But, political things like borders and sensitive areas are a different matter.

      I don't believe this is the first time a country has objected to the way an internet mapping service represents their country.

      This isn't about an accurate picture, so much as a politically driven interpretation or label. The US censors some Google data as well.

      Cheers

    • by DrLang21 (900992)
      They can only enforce this in their own country. In other words, if Google and Yahoo don't play by their rules, they will probably be filtered by the Great Firewall of China.
    • by jandersen (462034)

      Can a country do this?

      Of course they can. Basically, in order to produce any map, you have to somehow go and measure the area; if those who control the access the area don't permit you to enter or fly over it, you can't force yur way in; certainly not in the case of a sovereign country, but even on private land, in most cases. Of course, one could try one's luck with buying the information from whoever holds the pictures from America's spy sattelites, but I don't think the US government would like to seriously alienate China ov

    • by cyfer2000 (548592)
      You can't figure out borders, like the Mason-Dixon Line, from a satellite picture.
    • Having just gotten lost on the way to the airport in Austin, Texas after printing out instructions from Google maps, let me tell you: they can be very, very, very wrong...
    • how inaccurate can they be?
      Well, given that Google had "misplaced" Tibet [theregister.co.uk] and found a section of the Himilayas had moved [theregister.co.uk] several hundred miles, it depends on your definition of accuracy vs. the PRC's definition, I suppose.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by sydneyfong (410107)

      As Google maps are satellite based, how inaccurate can they be?
      Probably too accurate? Another message I got from the announcement was that the maps could contain "sensitive state secrets". We all know that the Chinese government has a rather strange interpretation of what constitutes "state secrets", but I guess they are concerned with having a too accurate map of the terrain in China, which could lead to military intelligence problems, for instance.
  • What does this mean? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by RandoX (828285) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:13AM (#23390674)
    Does Google need to pay to use the map that China produced, or to even show the country on a map that anyone produced? Are they licensing the map itself, or the representation of China's IP of the shape and layout of the country itself? If it's the latter, that's just... ill.

    What happens if they just ignore their weirdo regulations and continue to publish the maps? How about just not in China?
    • by cyfer2000 (548592)

      "So from now on, publishing maps would require approval and (yet another) license from the state survey bureau."

      I know we /.ers don't RTFA, but now it looks we don't read the teeny weeny summary too.

      BTW, it is not "from now on", it is from maybe 50 or 40 years ago. And the Google Chinese map is at http://ditu.google.cn/ [google.cn].

    • A better article (Score:5, Informative)

      by Tungbo (183321) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:48AM (#23391070)
      This link has more info: http://tech.sina.com.cn/i/2008-03-25/21362099485.shtml [sina.com.cn]

      Google licensed PRC geographic data from Beijing United Map Technology Limited (just a guess translation) who has a electronic map service license from the National Survey Department (apparently the prime driver for the regulatory initiative). The reporter speculates that the regulatory initiave may be related to the competition between Beijing United Map Technology with its duopoly competitior, Beijing Map Advanced Technology.

      The official reasons given by the Deputy Director of the National Survey Department are:
      1. Inaccurate boundaries show parts of PRC as soil of other nations
      2. Omission of south sea islands (disputed islands with Japan)
      3. Omission of Taiwan or labeling of Taiwan as independent
      4. Inaccurate boundaries between administrative regions and dissemination of important geographical data
      5. Annotation of sensitive, nonpublic, or national security information on the map.
                (Think of Dick Cheney's house...)

      Part of Google's objection is that there are no clear laws pertaining to online maps in PRC. Thus the regulators are not acting on a solid foundation. There remains wide spread confuson on what exactly is required by these regulations.

      As for Google's choices, they are actively protesting this initiative. But unless they prevail or pull out of China they would be subjected to their laws and likely to adapt to publishing only authorized versions of PRC maps.
      • by Lemmy Caution (8378) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @10:18AM (#23391398) Homepage
        Your summary, which explains how this is a dispute about the use of data which was provided by a Chinese source, is much too focused and accurate, and prevents people from the ceremonial outrage which constitute their 2 minute hate against China. You should be ashamed of yourself.
      • by pla (258480)
        But unless they prevail or pull out of China they would be subjected to their laws and likely to adapt to publishing only authorized versions of PRC maps.

        ...Which works well - Right up until Tibet, Taiwan, and Japan pass similar laws.

        IMO, if this decision came down to my personal call, I'd just erase any disputed territories from the map completely. Countries want to play games, they can play it over places no one can find on the map.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by FreeUser (11483)
      What happens if they just ignore their weirdo regulations and continue to publish the maps? How about just not in China?

      Or Publish China-Politico Maps as a separate option from Free-Tibet Maps. This reminds me of Arab countries cutting Israel out of inflatable globes donated for education (which of course made the inflatable globe uninflatable), except stupider.

      Hopefully google will publish one map inside of China, and a more sensible, complete map for the rest of us.

      Oh yeah, and unobscure Cheney's house p
  • by esocid (946821) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:18AM (#23390728) Journal
    Now how am I supposed to get from my house to Shanghai? I need those directions dammit.
  • by dpbsmith (263124) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:22AM (#23390782) Homepage
    I wish I had tracked this a little more closely, but for a couple of decades ordinary maps of Kentucky in atlases like Rand McNally and Hammond did not indicate the existence of the city of Fort Knox, despite showing far smaller cities.

    It was actually a little bit exciting to see the map in Ian Fleming's novel Goldfinger, showing the United States Bullion Depository located at the intersection of Bullion Boulevard and Gold Vault Road. In those days before Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] and Google Earth, this gave at least one reader frisson of forbidden information. I wondered whether Fleming would be the target of any mysterious reprisals for publishing it.

    • by _Shad0w_ (127912)

      BT Tower (formerly the Post Office Tower) was classified as an official secret until the mid-90s, which means it didn't appear on any maps.

  • Consumer Interests (Score:2, Interesting)

    by totallyarb (889799)

    It's nice to see that the Chinese Government have learned from their western counterparts that anything you do in the name of "protecting consumer interests" becomes allowable. Their next lesson: "think of the children".

    Forgive me if I'm stating the obvious, but it looks to me like the intention of this is to prevent Chinese citizens from seeing any map that recognises Taiwan or Tibet. Any one remember Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri? - Beware of he who would deny you access to information, for in his heart he

  • by MikeRT (947531) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:26AM (#23390822) Homepage
    If people get used to seeing "The Republic of Taiwan" instead of the "Shitty, Upstart Province of Formosa (or China's name for it) that Dares Act Independent," then that would give people the expectation that Taiwan is a sovereign country. If China goes to war, then it's not to reclaim a break-away province that has been acting like a renegade, but rather just another conquest like Iraq on Kuwait.

    Maps do have real political value behind them. There are a lot of people in Mexico that would love to see the reconquista of the Southwest, and the Mexican government has said in the past that expanding its territory back into the original territory is its goal. That's actually why the map that Absolut did in their advertising campaign was so controversial in the U.S.
  • Spot on (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Deadstick (535032) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:27AM (#23390834)
    That means Google, Yahoo, etc., need to remove China from the map

    A much better option than going along with what China wants them to publish. Sometimes the best course is to let jackasses make jackasses of themselves.

    rj

    • by blamanj (253811)
      It's even simpler. Publish China's maps when the request comes from China, publish non-Chinese maps the rest of the time.
    • So how does removing a region from a map work? Won't the area have an outline defined by the neighbouring nations and geographical formations identical to that which is covered by China? Tibet will still be there; it'll just have a big black blob designated "Rescinded" next to it, instead of a geographical representation of China. The blob will just so happen to cover China's area of influence, though.
       
  • by surmak (1238244)
    When China is talking about sovereignty, and "national interests and national dignity" they are really talking about having Taiwan (and maybe Tibet as well) labeled as independent nations.

    Basically, they do not want any maps to be available on the Net to their own people (or anyone else, but that is impossible) which contain such counter-revolutionary ideas such as an independent Taiwan(even if only de facto).

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by russotto (537200)

      Basically, they do not want any maps to be available on the Net to their own people (or anyone else, but that is impossible) which contain such counter-revolutionary ideas such as an independent Taiwan(even if only de facto).


      No problem. Just show all of China as one country... with the capital in Taipei.
      • It amazes me how far some people are willing to go to smite China for their flaws, by doing something worse.

        Whether Taiwan is part of China is a political controversy, but having the "Chinese capital" in Taipei is an outright lie.

        I guess it makes you feel smart and satisfied though. I guess anything that makes you feel happy goes.
  • by GeorgeNorton (548252) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:45AM (#23391020)
    CCTV's English language service ran this article a couple of months back: http://www.cctv.com/english/20080410/101774.shtml [cctv.com]
  • by Thanshin (1188877) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:49AM (#23391078)
    It will push the artificial intelligence field of image recognition to unthinkable heights.

    Blind people around the world should praise China for their invaluable help.

    If they can find China in any way of map representation it should surely be easy to discern among different types of porn.

    From a purely algorithmical point of view, of course.
  • by rarity (165626) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @09:54AM (#23391126)
    "On this spot in 1989, nothing happened".
  • Argentinan case (Score:2, Interesting)

    by chord.wav (599850)
    Argentina streets aren't in Google maps either. I've heard tons of versions regarding why practically every southamerican country but Argentina don't show up there. Including, and this one came from a Google employee, that the military/goverment didn't want to give "sensitive" information (Read: The bribe wasn't good enough). So they were looking for third party mapping companies to buy the data from (Read: Unhappy employee)

    MSN Live has streets but it seems they've used very old data as they show streets th
  • ...to give these fuckers a lesson in just how slippery and hard to control the truth can be.
  • There's already some coverage of China in openstreetmap.org (which is like Wikipedia for maps). For example, here's Shanghai:

    http://openstreetmap.org/?lat=31.226&lon=121.5487&zoom=12&layers=B0FT [openstreetmap.org]

    The coverage is only going to improve. Already in other countries, many cities are nearing completion. You can't close the mapping door after the GPS trace has bolted.

  • The South China Sea all the way to Malaysia and Philippines as being a part of China. Needless to say, the map treats all other seas, gulfs, and bays on the globe as being international waters.

    Chinese culture seems to me to still be in the 19th century in many regards, and unable to engage in self-criticism. I've never met a Chinese person who could admit opposing points in relation to Tibet for example, notwithstanding that these people are all intelligent and decent in other regards.

    I'd be able to feel
  • Sino-Indian war (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Pragmatix (688158) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @11:39AM (#23392274)
    I wonder if part of the reason China is so sensitive about maps is because of the McMahon Line http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McMahon_Line [wikipedia.org]


    It ended up in part, causing a war with India http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sino_indian_war [wikipedia.org]


    A lot of China's posturing and paranoia seems to almost make sense if you look at the history of how they have been treated by other nations.

  • Might this have something to do with the fact that China just had a large earthquake and in usual fashion they are trying to control the news of it. They essentially want to make such events seem very minor, and make it look to foreign eyes that they recover from such disasters in almost no time at all.

    And no it's probably not to just cover this one earthquake's damage, but really to cover news of future floods, quakes, fires, etc from outside eyes.
    • You're reading too much out of it.

      If you're going for a conspiracy-ish theory, this looks more likely to be a response to the Tibet independence movements last month.

      Even the Chinese aren't that efficient to draw up such a regulation/policy within a day.
  • by KillerBob (217953) on Tuesday May 13, 2008 @12:46PM (#23393124)
    Ahh... but if we remove China from the map, we can actually have an excuse to put "Here, thar be dragons" on the map!
  • People who wanting to breathe in and out will need to take permits from Secretariat of Breathe-in and from Secretariat of Breathe-Out respectively.

    Plans for regulations on Bodily Biological Gas Emissions by the Ministry of Natural Gas Resources are told to be underway, and citizens are urged to get their butt sizes measured at the nearest municipal authority.

"If that makes any sense to you, you have a big problem." -- C. Durance, Computer Science 234

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