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Cuba Lifts Ban on Home Computers 290

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the hello-computer dept.
ianare writes "The first legalized home computers have gone on sale in Cuba, the latest in a series of restrictions on daily life which President Raul Castro has lifted in recent weeks. The desktop computers cost almost $800, in a country where the average wage is under $20 a month, but some Cubans do have access to extra income. Internet access remains restricted to certain workplaces, schools and universities on the island which the government claims is due to low bandwidth availability. Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez is laying a new cable under the Caribbean, but it remains unclear whether once the connection is completed, the authorities will allow unrestricted access to the internet."
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Cuba Lifts Ban on Home Computers

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  • This is not news... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by isilrion (814117) on Saturday May 03, 2008 @09:31AM (#23283750)
    I'm a Cuban. This happened more than a month ago. And we are very happy that someone finally came to his senses about it.

    What's new, though, is that [startin soon], they are going to be sold without operating systems... No more windows pre-installed. Or so I've heard. Now we only need tons of Ubuntu disks to give away at the sotre.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 03, 2008 @09:34AM (#23283774)

      This happened more than a month ago.
      I guess they haven't worked out the latency issue yet.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by mrbluze (1034940)

      No more windows pre-installed. Or so I've heard. Now we only need tons of Ubuntu disks to give away at the sotre.
      Wow, talk about being behind and ahead at the same time! Do they have a ban on the eeepc and other less-than-$800 computers? And any way it doesn't have to be $800 - surely there is a market for importing old hardware?
      • by Dogtanian (588974) on Saturday May 03, 2008 @09:45AM (#23283830) Homepage
        At $800 for a new PC, I think that Cubans are going to resort to doing what they did with cars; taking pre-revolution ones and keeping them going for 40-50 years.

        Unfortunately, I think they'll have trouble getting the valves/tubes for those old 1950s models, and they probably won't be of a high enough spec to run the latest malware.
        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by Karem Lore (649920)
          You'd be surprised at how resourceful Cuban people are...I am amazed at how they make some of those old cars still work with no parts available...
          • by drinkypoo (153816)

            You'd be surprised at how resourceful Cuban people are...I am amazed at how they make some of those old cars still work with no parts available...

            Engine swaps used to be more common in this country. What happened? Emissions laws.

            In terms of keeping the chassis rolling, however, a lot of those older cars used really standard sizes for bearings and whatnot. So once you get the engine out of the equation you have a bunch of stuff that's really easy to interchange and get parts for.

            The things that tend to cost the most in a restoration are hard-to-find parts, body/trim, interior, et cetera. Labor is cheap in Cuba, and there's no emphasis on original

          • by ShieldW0lf (601553) on Saturday May 03, 2008 @11:27AM (#23284392) Journal
            .I am amazed at how they make some of those old cars still work with no parts available...

            Do you realize that is a sign of how far your country has fallen? It was when people said that of your people that your country was great. Now, you rely on exploitative economics and war where once you relied on yourselves, and marvel that a people could take care of themselves.

            • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

              The fact that we don't need to rely on ourselves, the fact that we have other people do our dirty work for us, that makes us Superior.
              • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

                by ShieldW0lf (601553)
                No, it makes you inferior. It makes you mewling dependents who can't care for yourselves, like babies with nukes. It makes your desperate grasping for dominion understandable, in a pathetic sort of way. Unfortunately, it doesn't make it excusable, or sustainable. There is a lot of hardship and death in your future. Fortunately.
          • by turgid (580780) on Saturday May 03, 2008 @12:21PM (#23284720) Journal

            You'd be surprised at how resourceful Cuban people are...I am amazed at how they make some of those old cars still work with no parts available...

            I'm Scottish. My grandfather had a lathe, a welding set, a bandsaw, a circular saw, various soldering irons, dies and taps etc. Parts for engines were made now and then, weights for fishing etc.

            My father has it all now.

            I dare say it'll be mine one day too, but I haven't a clue how to use any of it.

            • by smoker2 (750216) on Saturday May 03, 2008 @12:40PM (#23284816) Homepage Journal
              You don't have to be Cuban to be resourceful.
              The clutch actuating rod broke on my motor home while I was in the Welsh mountains once. A visit to the local Ford dealer revealed that they no longer made the part, and scrap yards were a waste of time.
              So after buying a portable gas torch, a few brazing rods, a hacksaw and a bolt, I was able to braze the bolt to the end of the broken rod and fix the problem immediately. It was the strongest part of the van after that.
              Also, because initially I had to get from the mountains to the town where the shop was, I got the clutch working by stealing about 4 feet of wire from a fence, and winding it back and forth between the pedal lever and the clutch release arm. This I then tightened up using a screwdriver between the strands which was kept from unwinding by being wedged against the vans body. That worked for 3 days before I got to do the permanent repair.
              It's not hard to do these things, just takes a little bit of application.
              BTW, I consider this hacking in one of its truest forms.
              • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

                by clifyt (11768)
                "I got the clutch working by stealing about 4 feet of wire from a fence, and winding it back and forth between the pedal lever and the clutch release arm."

                Hell...I did something similar with my last car...the part was $300 from Saturn, and I was like BULLSHIT because it was a tiny piece of the part that broke. Ended up drilling two holes, grabbing some wire (this is where you caught me...I had fencing wire in my garage...nice heavy gauge) and wove it between the two pieces. I kept it that way until I boug
        • by phorm (591458)
          $800? $300 for an EeePC. And there are others like OLPC. Sure, you might not see a lot of cubans joining into games of Quake or GTA4 online, but they can still do a lot for less than $800.b
        • by British (51765)
          At $800 for a new PC, I think that Cubans are going to resort to doing what they did with cars; taking pre-revolution ones and keeping them going for 40-50 years.

          I think this could also work somewhat for computers. They could get by just fine setting up Linux distros on older systems. It would be interesting to see what they would develop.
      • by explosivejared (1186049) <(moc.liamg) (ta) (deraj.nagah)> on Saturday May 03, 2008 @09:49AM (#23283870)
        Just because it costs less than 800 dollars in the rest of the world doesn't mean that it will be that cheap inside the country. Any market for importing old hardware is likely to be a black market, so the prices will be steep. It's the right step to allow personal computers in Cuba, but the majority of the people are a long way from it making any difference at all.

        Just an idea, since my US government is all about supporting an open and free Cuba, it might not be bad idea to lead some sort of initiative to proliferate computers to the people. I know the government might frown upon something like this, but it would give America the moral high ground, which is something neither side has been worthy of so far.
        • by nurb432 (527695)
          Even if prices are steep, families could pool their money and buy one PC for an entire neighborhood.

        • by Richard_at_work (517087) <richardprice@nOSPam.gmail.com> on Saturday May 03, 2008 @10:56AM (#23284246)

          Just an idea, since my US government is all about supporting an open and free Cuba, it might not be bad idea to lead some sort of initiative to proliferate computers to the people. I know the government might frown upon something like this, but it would give America the moral high ground, which is something neither side has been worthy of so far.
          Sorry, but your government is all about supporting a decades old grudge and nothing else - your government deals with and indeed in some cases support regimes far worse than Cuba.

          There is no reason any import market has to be a black market, Cuba is free to trade with the rest of the world, including Europe, and as such has an open market to exploit.
          • by MrSteveSD (801820) on Saturday May 03, 2008 @01:01PM (#23284934)

            There is no reason any import market has to be a black market, Cuba is free to trade with the rest of the world


            The US has tried to threaten companies that if they deal with Cuba, they can't operate within the US. The EU got very angry over the issue. Whether the US managed to frighten companies off, I don't know. I wouldn't be surprised though.

            As for the "decades old grudge", yes, it is a grudge. When Castro ousted the US-backed Batista, the US lost control, and US Policy towards Cuba has been about control right from the beginning. A condition of the US troops withdrawing from Cuba in 1901 was that they sign the Platt Amendment, which gave the US all sorts of powers over Cuba. It was very much a Godfather-style "offer you can't refuse". Although the Platt Amendment was repealed in 1934, the US kept one of the clauses which was the Naval base at Guantanamo. According to the Platt Amendment clause, it can only be removed with the consent of both parties, which is completely ridiculous.
            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by earthforce_1 (454968)

              There was a funny incident in Canada, I think it was related to the Helms/Burton act http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helms-Burton_Act [wikipedia.org] where the Canadian Wal-Mart stores were found to be selling Cuban made clothing, and the US government ordered them to stop. So they (briefly) stopped. Canadian newspapers found out and it was turned into a big sovereignty flap on this side of the border. The Canadian government then forbade any company operating on Canadian soil from obeying the embargo, and Wal-Mart's Cuban
              • by MrSteveSD (801820) on Saturday May 03, 2008 @05:15PM (#23286462)

                The Canadian government then forbade any company operating on Canadian soil from obeying the embargo


                The EU did pretty much the same thing, but it's sure to have frightened away some companies. Saudi Arabia makes Cuba look like a model free society, yet the oppressive regime there is supported by the US. The US stance against Cuba has nothing to do with freedom or democracy. Indeed the history of US policy in the region has been one of deterring democracy, not promoting it.

                The US wants cooperative governments that are friendly to US business interests. The current government of Venezuela fails both those tests, so despite being a democracy, the US is trying to undermine it and there was of course the coup attempt in 2002 as well. Such a coup attempt is far easier to organise in an open society like Venezuela than in Cuba, which is probably one of the reasons Cuba has been closed up so tight for so long.

                The US is also trying to undermine the current Bolivian government for much the same reason. The US government far preferred the previous business friendly regime, despite the massacres perpetrated against the Bolivian people.
          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by servognome (738846)

            Sorry, but your government is all about supporting a decades old grudge and nothing else - your government deals with and indeed in some cases support regimes far worse than Cuba

            Not even that, I'm sure there are many American entrepreneurs who lobby to trade with Cuba. Problem is there is a vocal Cuban community in the key election state of Florida that is strongly against dealing with Castro. Most people in the US don't have a strong opinion on the subject, so you end up with politicians catering to a vo

      • I don't know, but I would hazard a guess that import duty would be a significant portion of the cost of these computers. It could even be a $300 computer [as in, that's how much it would cost in the US], being sold for $800, just because it's new.

        Or it could just be vendors gouging for something new.
    • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

      by dotancohen (1015143)

      Now we only need tons of Ubuntu disks to give away at the sotre.
      Post your snail mail address and I'll send you a stack of them. Let the island enjoy Ubuntu [what-is-what.com] and maybe Raul's Cuba do what Fidel's couldn't do: really stick it to US corporations such as Microsoft.
    • by chakmol (88099) on Saturday May 03, 2008 @09:49AM (#23283868)

      I'm a Cuban. This happened more than a month ago. And we are very happy that someone finally came to his senses about it.
      What's new, though, is that [startin soon], they are going to be sold without operating systems... No more windows pre-installed. Or so I've heard. Now we only need tons of Ubuntu disks to give away at the sotre.


      I was over there in 2005, and visited a few folks who already had computers at home, but good to hear it's now legal. In a couple of net cafes I visited in Havana, all the computers had the KDE desktop, but I didn't get a chance to see what was running under it.

      Many Cubans access e-mail and net at the post office, Correos de Cuba, and the lines were usually long.

      These were just some observations while there.
    • by linhux (104645)
      I think I can help collecting some CD's to send over, if only I get an address and such. But I'm guessing Canonical can help, too.
  • According to Cuban supporters, there is no restriction to visit websites, the real problem is that the whole country have a very limited bandwidth so most pages doesn't load at all. And this limitation is thanks to the US who put a ban on export of goods and services to Cuba.
    The main problem I see is that they are using mostly unlicensed copy of windows, since Windows licenses can't be acquired in Cuba.
    • and how hard will it be the set a wireless link from Cuba to the USA.
      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by Ogi_UnixNut (916982)

        From a quick look on Google maps, it would seem that the distance between Cuba and nearest American soil (Key West) is slightly under 200km.

        It would be possible to string up a wireless link, indeed the current record is 238 miles (383km - link [blogspot.com] ), so it is possible.

        I think the bigger issue is the legality of doing this. The embargo on Cuba does not only apply to the governments, but to citizens of both countries. You setting up a wifi link is a violation of that embargo, and could get you in serious tr

        • by tepples (727027) <{moc.liamg} {ta} {selppet}> on Saturday May 03, 2008 @10:57AM (#23284256) Homepage Journal

          It would be possible to string up a wireless link, indeed the current record is 238 miles (383km - link [blogspot.com] ), so it is possible.
          Maybe for 802.11*. But people routinely bounce signals off a radio repeater placed 35,000 km off the ground [wikipedia.org].

          I think the bigger issue is the legality of doing this. The embargo on Cuba does not only apply to the governments, but to citizens of both countries. You setting up a wifi link is a violation of that embargo, and could get you in serious trouble.
          Is the United States of America the only country in the western hemisphere with satellites? Might some Spanish- or even Portuguese-speaking country be more willing to help out
    • by canuck57 (662392) on Saturday May 03, 2008 @09:49AM (#23283872)

      The main problem I see is that they are using mostly unlicensed copy of windows, since Windows licenses can't be acquired in Cuba.

      Hey, how come Cubans can order PCs and not have to pay for Windows? Heck, they are already once step ahead of us.

      If the US was smart, strike and agreement with Cuba, given them decent pipe access via Florida so long as they put 1 million uncensored PCs on it in say 2-3 years. That will reach 1 in 11 Cubans. Free flow of information is a true friend of democracy.

      • by drinkypoo (153816) <martin.espinoza@gmail.com> on Saturday May 03, 2008 @10:06AM (#23283962) Homepage Journal
        Keeping Cuba locked down is critical to our ideological bullshit. Maintaining the embargo encourages others to do so, which depresses Cuba and causes them to be less successful, which we get to blame on ideology and use as a reason why we must go on a holy war to spread Democracy throughout the world (perhaps we should start here first, eh?) We don't actually want Democracy in Cuba, or we WOULD HAVE opened up to them. The real issue is that our government fears free speech. Cubans can actually get health care...
        • by anvilmark (259376)
          Only the US has an embargo in effect against Cuba - all the rest of the world is free to trade with them. Who's really responsible for the average wage being $20 a month?

          Viva le People's Paradise!!!
        • Maintaining the embargo encourages others to do so,

          Apart from chavez, hes blatantly doing anything he can to piss off america.

          In all honesty I dont think there is any issue, its just childishness and no American politician want to 'look weak'( because we all know talking to your enemies gives you cooties).Thanks to the hilary, Obama bull its getting less and less likely that Obama wins the election, which is a really shame because he seams to be the only person who realises how childish the cuba situation is.

          If there is any issue it might be Guantanamo bay

        • by ArcherB (796902)

          Keeping Cuba locked down is critical to our ideological bullshit. Maintaining the embargo encourages others to do so, which depresses Cuba and causes them to be less successful, which we get to blame on ideology and use as a reason why we must go on a holy war to spread Democracy throughout the world (perhaps we should start here first, eh?)

          Is the US the only country in the world that trades. The US is ONE country. Are you saying that the US is so powerful that if we don't trade with you, your economy has no chance to do well, even if ALL THE OTHER COUNTRIES IN THE WORLD will trade with you? Hell, they can even buy American goods through third party countries if they so desired. In other words, maybe, just maybe, it really is their ideological bullshit that causes them to fail because it sure as shit ain't the US embargo. Unless, of cour

        • by Shihar (153932)
          It has nothing to do with health care. Only an idiot would point to Cuba as a model for anything, as any idiot could also point out that an American bum panhandling makes more money per day than a Cuban makes in a month. There are some great examples of nations with good universal health care that don't have oppressive totalitarian governments and a deeply impoverished people. I would suggest pointing towards Europe for universal health care models.

          Ideological the embargo certainly is though. After Worl
      • If the US was smart, strike and agreement with Cuba, given them decent pipe access via Florida so long as they put 1 million uncensored PCs on it in say 2-3 years. That will reach 1 in 11 Cubans. Free flow of information is a true friend of democracy.
        Shhh, if we speak to our enemies everybody will think were weak, we just have to ignore them because that way Iran/cuba/china/next enemy will just go away.
    • by jimicus (737525) on Saturday May 03, 2008 @09:51AM (#23283882)

      The main problem I see is that they are using mostly unlicensed copy of windows, since Windows licenses can't be acquired in Cuba.
      How's that a problem? Cuba's a classic example of the kind of place where Microsoft would far rather people pirate Windows than use Ubuntu legitimately - get 'em hooked then tighten the anti-piracy screws later.
    • by Dogtanian (588974)

      The main problem I see is that they are using mostly unlicensed copy of windows
      That's a problem from whose point of view? Not Cuba's, so they likely wouldn't care.

      Any targeted security risks from using a closed-source unaudited OS like Windows (via US-government-endorsed backdoors) would likely apply whether it was paid for or not. Ditto lock-in issues, etc etc
    • by isilrion (814117) on Saturday May 03, 2008 @11:06AM (#23284298)

      I would say, both parts are true. Cuban bandwdith is severely limited, thus, it is obviuous that certain key areas are prioritized (oddly enough, universities aren't - we have a 1mbs for 10 thousand users at mine).

      On the other hand, that doesn't explain why don't we have conectivity even within our countries (it is faster to download Debian from the internet that it is to download it from the cuban mirrors [softwarelibre.cu]). There is even one law to address this issue [mic.gov.cu], that has been largely ignored except on the part of giving monopoly-like powers to our phone company. And it even seem they find cheaper to use satellite to connect two places within the city, than to lay a couple hundred metters of fiber to the nearest hub.

      With that, though, I'm willing to call (the ministry of informatics and communications, the phone company, whatever), ignorant rather than evil. I do accept that the reason for that is technical (that we are forbidden to hook to the fiber optics that go around my country). But, there is censorship. Over time, I've collected a set of domains that seem to be banned. No one never confirms it, and the banning works as if the remote server was not working, but routing the request through a proxy server, you find out that it is indeed working. And more recently, we got this other law [mic.gov.cu], that was publicly mentioned by this guy [vivirlatino.com], and forbids chats, formus and mailing lists.

      So, we have everything. We have serious technical difficulties caused by the US (internet access). We have serious technical difficulties caused by who-knows-who (intranet access). And, we have censorship. I have high hopes that if the first one is solved, the rest will follow. However, for the sake of my country and our socialism... I do wish that the last two are solved first.

    • I'd be happy to send them every copy of Vista that I own, but that might scare them back into severe isolation.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by 0111 1110 (518466)

      The main problem I see is that they are using mostly unlicensed copy of windows
      How is that a problem? I have never used a licensed copy of windows.
    • by ArcherB (796902)

      According to Cuban supporters, there is no restriction to visit websites, the real problem is that the whole country have a very limited bandwidth so most pages doesn't load at all. And this limitation is thanks to the US who put a ban on export of goods and services to Cuba.
      The main problem I see is that they are using mostly unlicensed copy of windows, since Windows licenses can't be acquired in Cuba.

      Every other country in the world trades with Cuba. Because the US doesn't, they can't get broadband? Can they not get broadband from Venezuela, Mexico, Canada, Europe, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Argentina, Aruba, St. Martin, Africa, China, Japan, Panama, Vietnam, N. Korea, or S. Korea?

      Is the US so powerful that a country can barely get by without US trade?

  • Maybe a 10GBit undersea fiber run from Florida would be a good start. Getting their educational and medical infrastructure wired would help open up their community.
    • by Splab (574204) on Saturday May 03, 2008 @10:07AM (#23283964)
      You of course are aware that Cuba has way better medical care for its citizens than the US does?

      Think they'll like to pass on getting US style medical.
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by maxume (22995)
        They don't have better care. Somewhat ironically, they have more democratic care, but that's about average availability, not level of quality.

        The US probably even delivers more care per person on average, it just gets concentrated more.
      • by cybrchld (229583) on Saturday May 03, 2008 @11:52AM (#23284538)
        You are sadly misinformed. i have relatives in Cuba an the medical care there is very bad. yes the doctors and free but there is no medicine or supply's to help the public, my nice had a baby just recently and we had to actually provide all the sutures and thread to close her c section, not to mention when your taken to a hospital you need to bring your own sheets towels Etc. the only ones that get quality and cheap treatment are foreigners which pay. By far the worst care here is 10x better than what they have there.

        Stop believing the Lies a few socialist nut jobs are perpetrating.
        • Yeah i always hear the UK House of Commons Health Select Committee, Newsnight, the Gallup Organization, Kofi Annan, The Kaiser Family Foundation, the President of the World Bank (James Wolfensohn) being called socialist nut jobs and lairs. Sure there are problems because of the crippled economy, but generally the Cuban healthcare system has got praise from everybody apart from the US
        • by Manchot (847225)
          Yeah, those socialist nut jobs at the World Health Organization who rank Cuba just below the U.S. [photius.com] in terms of health care are the liars. Not the Republican Party, who insist that our health care system is just peachy.
    • There is already fiber from the US - but they won't allow it to be activated because of the trade embargo. Sounds like that would be a better start.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Cuba has multiple satellite uplinks which are capable of internet traffic, though it's *very* expensive, and as anyone whos ever tried to use satellite connections knows, it can be slow as hell. Couple with that the single T-3 (probably still channelized---demuxers are evidently "sensitive" equipment), and yeah, there are some major bandwidth issues. So settle down and lose the McCarthy bullshit, thanks.
  • . . . that they don't follow in Nigeria's footsteps. The last thing we need is for some Cuban to start emailing our grandparents asking for help to get some hidden money off of the island into an American bank!

    DEAR AMERICANO - I HAVE BEEN LIVING CUBA SINCE 1951. MY FATHER HAS STASHED AWAY 500 MILLION BILION CUBAN PESSOS IN BASEMENT HERE IN HABANNNNA. HE ALSO HAS LARGE SUPPLY OF CUBBAN CIGARILLOS THAT HE BEEN QUIETLY TAKING ONE PER DAY SINCE 1962 FROM CIGAR FACTORY. HE NEEEDS HELP GETTING THEM OFF OF THE I

  • I imagine that there will be copies of Microsoft windows on pc's, and the dvd's will have a fee paid to hollywood licensing body at the mpiaa. Will Steve Balmer find himself in American prison for selling to Cuba ? Since no doubt some of this money comes from outside Cuba, are not the citizens of America helping propping up Fidel and his cronies. Will the bank records be used to hunt down these people. The US Treasury should be vigilant and like it did with the cuban inspired domain names enforce the l
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by maxume (22995)
      If you sold me a loaf of bread and I sold it to Cuba, would you be culpable?

      Why would you think that software would be any different? If Microsoft was involved in setting up intermediaries to deliver software to Cuba and it happened at the board level Balmer might get some heat for it, but he can't do a whole lot to stop a distributor in Mexico from shipping stuff to Cuba.
  • Basically, the American restrictions on Cuba are total bullshit, and the rest of the world knows it. however, due to longstanding imperialist policies (like the Monroe doctrine) Cuba falls under the geographic hegemony of the USA. This was challenged by the CCCP from 1959 - 1991. When the Russians collapsed, Cuba had some "special times", like super special shitty times, that the draconian and retarded embargo by the USA only enhanced.

    So, now Venezuela has come to Cuba's assistance by helping with data ca

    • by russotto (537200) on Saturday May 03, 2008 @11:47AM (#23284504) Journal

      Basically, the American restrictions on Cuba are total bullshit, and the rest of the world knows it. however, due to longstanding imperialist policies (like the Monroe doctrine) Cuba falls under the geographic hegemony of the USA. This was challenged by the CCCP from 1959 - 1991. When the Russians collapsed, Cuba had some "special times", like super special shitty times, that the draconian and retarded embargo by the USA only enhanced.


      There are no American restrictions on Cubans. The American restrictions are on Americans (with a few even more bullshit extensions attempting to extend the embargo to non-American companies who deal with Americans; even Canada won't put up with that shit) . And calling an embargo "imperialist" is pretty rich... what would you call it if the US had normal relations with Cuba and there was a Starbucks and a McDonalds on every corner in Havana? Oh, right... you'd call it "cultural imperialism" or something similar.

  • (...) a country where the average wage is under $20 a month

    I spend more than $20 a day just on food, Cuba will have to import a lot of stuff over sea and they can live for $20 a MONTH ? Sure, cubans won't have the quality and quantity available to us, but I still get the feeling we are being ripped off.
    • It has to do with opportunity cost, capital & labor will demand higher prices if there is an evivalent investment with similar risk that earns them a greater return.
  • Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez is laying a new cable under the Caribbean
    Mr. Chavez is doing this himself, personally? Wow. That's worthy of international applause. I can't see either of our North American heads of state dirtying their hands to dig cable trench across a local field, let alone beneath an entire sea!

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