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Microsoft Privacy

Microsoft Giving Away Vista Ultimate, With a Catch 495

Posted by kdawson
from the no-free-lunch dept.
Opinari writes "In case you haven't heard, Microsoft is giving away copies of Windows Vista Ultimate (32-bit or 64-bit DVD), Microsoft Office Ultimate 2007, Microsoft Money Plus Premium, Microsoft Student with Encarta Premium 2008, or Microsoft Streets and Trips 2008 — you can choose any one. The caveat is that you have to let them monitor your use of the program."
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Microsoft Giving Away Vista Ultimate, With a Catch

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  • Free... (Score:5, Funny)

    by crazyjeremy (857410) * on Tuesday December 11, 2007 @11:48PM (#21667347) Homepage Journal
    Free as in Linux? No, free as in Microsoft!
    • Re:Free... (Score:5, Funny)

      by squidinkcalligraphy (558677) on Tuesday December 11, 2007 @11:52PM (#21667373)
      Free as in beer? No, free as in an NSA wiretap!
    • Re:Free... (Score:5, Funny)

      by davester666 (731373) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:10AM (#21667545) Journal
      The catch...you have to use Vista..
      • Re:Free... (Score:5, Informative)

        by Mistlefoot (636417) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @02:16AM (#21668237)
        I didn't read all the details but it does imply XP as well as Vista...

        To quote from the second page towards registration:

        "Choose the program(s) you would like to join
        Automated feedback program (Windows Vista and Windows XP only)"

        and further on in the uninstallation instructions.....

        "Windows XP Instructions:

              1. Click Start, click Control Panel, click Add or Remove Programs, and then click Change or Remove Programs.
              2. Select Windows Feedback Panel, and then click Remove.
        "
      • Re:Free... (Score:4, Funny)

        by nem75 (952737) <jens@bremmekamp.com> on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @04:24AM (#21668795)

        The catch...you have to use Vista..
        Nah. You could just not use it and let them monitor that.
      • Re:Free... (Score:4, Insightful)

        by bigdavesmith (928732) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @08:03AM (#21669711)

        The catch...you have to use Vista..
        Yeah, I've already given them my feedback by not downloading it. Even for free.
    • Re:Free... (Score:5, Funny)

      by SL Baur (19540) <steve@xemacs.org> on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @01:30AM (#21668037) Homepage Journal
      Free as in Microsoft ...

      What are the system requirements?
      The only requirements are that your home PC is running the Microsoft Windows Vista or Windows XP operating system, and that you have an Internet connection. That's it!
      I guess I don't qualify :( and I so wanted to dance in the streets burning Linux and Mac OS X cds celebrating my new freedom while I was installing a real OS on my MacBook Pro ...
  • by amccaf1 (813772) on Tuesday December 11, 2007 @11:51PM (#21667363)

    The caveat is that you have to let them monitor your use of the program.
    Wait, which is the catch: the fact that they will monitor your use, or the implication that you'll be using it?
    • by vistic (556838) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @03:09AM (#21668479)
      I'll freak MS out by doing nothing with ULTIMATE Office except try to open OpenOffice documents all day long.
  • Not accurate. (Score:5, Informative)

    by Junta (36770) on Tuesday December 11, 2007 @11:51PM (#21667365)
    They want to monitor whatever you are currently using today, XP or Vista, and won't give the goods until after three months of watching your stuff.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by lionchild (581331)
      And what if you're not using XP or Vista currently? Are you just left out, or do they have a linux tool to monitor you?

      I've got a machine still loaded with OS/2. And a nice little G4 with OS X 10.4.11.
      • They only want to spy on current users of their software, evidently. So you can get a free copy of Windows, but only if you are already running Windows. Guess they are not out to capture non-Windows users (they probably don't even fathom that concept).
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by geekoid (135745)
          If some comes to your house and says:
          I'll give you 300 bucks, and in exchange I'll sit in the living room to see how you use furniture, and oh, btw I'll leave anytime you ask me, and you accept the offer. They aren't SPYING. Monitoring, but not spying. Now if you ask them to leave, and the sneak into a closet and monitor you from there, then it's SPYING.
          And considering Spying is unauthorized monitoring, You would be hard pressed to find any case where MS spies on you. Granted, thats a technicality, since th
  • by explosivejared (1186049) <`moc.liamg' `ta' `deraj.nagah'> on Tuesday December 11, 2007 @11:54PM (#21667389)
    The caveat is that you have to let them monitor your use of the program.

    This is how I would go about this. I would get a free copy of vista. Then, I would set web cam up outside on the driveway. I would grab a wood maul and just go to town on the disc, and do my best to savor the thought of MS technicians staring on in horror.
  • No longer available (Score:5, Informative)

    by beavis88 (25983) on Tuesday December 11, 2007 @11:55PM (#21667393)
    At least not the free gift part. From an email received from Microsoft posted to hardwareanalysis.com forums:

    "What happened to the free product option?

    Thank you for your interest in the feedback program. Due to overwhelming response, the supply of gifts have been exhausted so we have closed our free product offer on 12/11/2007 at 2pm. Thanks to everyone that participated!"
  • Oh, wait - it's not. You're giving something (information to them) to get something (free OS). Nothing wrong with that.
  • by unassimilatible (225662) on Tuesday December 11, 2007 @11:58PM (#21667433) Journal
    "All the sex you want! But you're not going to like the catch."
  • and let "the program" monitor a nice stream of goatse.
  • Honeypot (Score:5, Funny)

    by fractalVisionz (989785) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:00AM (#21667457) Homepage
    I should set up a honeypot with their products. Hopefully when they are watching, they will get a virus or infected by a bot net.
  • by Z80xxc! (1111479) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:00AM (#21667459)

    Instead of letting them see every single thing you do on your computer for a whole 3 months (or longer... who knows what stays on your computer after installing the software), why not install Windows XP in a VM, install their crap, run it once or twice a week to "check your email" or whatever, and then after three months, collect your software? They only see what goes on in the VM, you get your free Vista and everyone's happy. Well, if using Vista can be considered as something that would make you happy.

    Just to show how bad their monitoring actually is:

    3. Additional data collection

    The following list describes some examples of additional data collection our software performs:

    • Windows settings and usage, such as the number of user accounts on the computer and the view settings for Control Panel (that is, if you use the default Category view or the Classic view to display Control Panel).
    • Details about your computer hardware, such as processor type and speed (as well as the number of processors), system memory, video memory, and other hardware configuration information.
    • File and folder information, such as the number of files and folders located in common places (for example, in Documents).
      * Which programs you open (for example, which application you use to read your e-mail).
      * Changes you make to your hardware or software.
      * Problems you encounter, such as application crashes.

    They're basically looking at everything you do. Here's my favorite bit from the whole thing:

    This sounds good, but I'm still concerned. Is this anything like the "spyware" I've heard about?
    No, this is not spyware. You choose to participate in the Windows Feedback Program and you can easily withdraw from the Program at any time with no penalty whatsoever.

    This sounds like spyware? Yeah, I'll say. But noooooooo, it's not at all harmful for your computer. Rigghhhtttt....

    • by Kawahee (901497) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:06AM (#21667513) Homepage Journal

      They're basically looking at everything you do
      Yes, they're looking at everything they do with Windows, not everything you do with your data.
    • by sqrt(2) (786011)
      As long as the data isn't personally identifiable there shouldn't be a real privacy concern. The problem is you have no way of knowing for sure if it is personal data or not. For example, the number of files and folders on your hard drive isn't really sensitive personal information, I wouldn't care if MS or anyone knew that, but the names of the files and folders would be a concern to me. Same with e-mail and user accounts. How many e-mails I get a day, how long I have Thunderbird open, those aren't privacy
      • by Junta (36770) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:24AM (#21667637)
        Cause for concern:

        Will I be able to see what data I'm sharing with you?

        Unfortunately, you will not be able to look at your specific data. We designed the Windows Feedback Program software specifically to avoid any interference with your work or how your computer functions. To do that, the data you are sharing is stored in a binary format (zeros and ones) rather than in text format. Storing the data in binary format makes it very small and easy to share with us, but difficult for you to translate and interpret.
        Damn, stored in zeros and ones, nothing I can do, it's binary. There's no way they could let me know how to understand it. If only it were just zeros, or ones, or maybe some twos...
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by mrscott (548097)
      I guess it depends on how you personally think of spyware. Me - if I opt in and tell Microsoft that it's ok for them to do this and I'm getting something in return - yep, that's probably not spyware in the malware sense.

      And, if they're checking your hardware, they can probably tell very easily if it's running in a VM.

      Interesting how you define "everything". I doubt they really care what I have in my Word files, what I have in my Excel spreadsheets, etc. They're looking for general usage patterns to ident

  • Prior Art (Score:5, Insightful)

    by madbawa (929673) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:05AM (#21667501) Journal
    They want us to let them monitor use of their program?? Don't they do that already???
  • by xubu_caapn (1086401) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:07AM (#21667517)
    I don't see the issue here. No question of privacy really, people can choose to do this or not, and it's openly the catch. Microsoft probably wants to watch people's use of it to see what people have trouble with and what they can improve..
    • I only use Windows for tech support, the occasional Windows-only utility, and games. All my real work is done under Ubuntu or OS X. I'd take Microsoft up on their offer, if for no other reason than to - ugh - get more familiar with Vista.
    • don't see the issue here. No question of privacy really, people can choose to do this or not, and it's openly the catch. Microsoft probably wants to watch people's use of it to see what people have trouble with and what they can improve..

      Funny thing is they may find people never use ebay, paypal, or online banking. (Would you log into any of these on a monitored computer?)

  • Upon further digging (Score:3, Interesting)

    by HadesInjustice (872477) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:08AM (#21667535)
    Does the software impact the performance of my computer? "We have gone to great lengths to design the Windows Feedback Program software to limit the amount of computer resources it uses to collect data. You may see a minor change in performance when you first log in to Windows; however, this typically only occurs during the first few minutes after login while we are collecting basic configuration information." In my opinion, that translate to... "The print out of the code is so lengthy the printer ran out of ink, twice. The software will not severely hamper the performance of the computer (as compare to Vista that already used up ~500mb of RAM on idle, there isn't all that much performance left to hamper anyway). After you first log in, we are going to collect some basic information and make sure you have an authentic Windows OS. We might decide to sue you or disable your OS if we found it to be pirated."
    • by sqrt(2) (786011) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:17AM (#21667597) Journal
      Do people still not understand how Vista manages RAM? This is slashdot, of all places I'd expect the people here to understand pre-emptive caching. That 50% RAM usage isn't Vista, it's all kinds of stuff that you are constantly opening being kept in memory so that the next time you need it the program can open faster. It learns your habits and caches stuff it knows you frequently use. It's the reason why WMP11, firefox, or word opens nearly instantly when I click on it. You can even turn this feature off it bugs you so much, it's a service called superfetch.

      There are legitimate reasons for disliking Vista, there's so many in fact that you don't need to be using this false one to pad your list of complaints. When you do, it weakens your argument and makes it look like you don't have any idea what you're talking about.
      • by HadesInjustice (872477) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:25AM (#21667651)
        I am sorry if I am a chemical engineer and not a EE or CS major. But if what you said is true, then the RAM usage on a perfectly new computer with Vista shouldn't used up around 500mb of RAM either, but they are. Also, if it already cache the information, then how come every time I open Firefox or Winamp, I see a clear jump in my RAM memory? What I mean is...why is it that Vista sit at idle at around ~500mb, and the moment I open firefox (which I have been using on a daily basis for months), it jump to around 650-700mb? If it is already cached, shouldn't it stay relatively constant?
        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by SL Baur (19540)

          the moment I open firefox (which I have been using on a daily basis for months), it jump to around 650-700mb? If it is already cached, shouldn't it stay relatively constant?

          Because it's not already cached and Firefox is well, kind of a pig. The caches only get filled and (re)used while your computer is booted, once it crashes (or you shut it down) and you reboot, everything has to be reloaded.


          $ ps -uxaww | grep firefox
          steve 1719 29.4 -25.8 1521604 542080 ?? Ss 3Dec07 4099:18.16 /Applications/Firefox.app/Contents/MacOS/firefox-bin -foreground


          I've only had this instance of Firefox running a little more than a week - see the 3-December start date and it's taking 1.5

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by Sax Maniac (88550)
          Not a bad questions, but it's pretty simple. The OS can only prefetch things that are the stable from session to session, like the program's bits on disk and loaded libraries. Any memory allocated by the program at runtime be cached, because that OS doesn't know what it's going to be.

          An example.

          Let's say I have a program that's a mere 50K on disk, but allocates 200MB of memory on startup, and fills it with data in from hardware - maybe a video capture. The O/S cannot cache the 200MB because it doesn't kn
      • This remains incorrect. The 500MB /is/ actual core system process memory usage. It can be greatly reduced by turning off extraneous processes. The additional memory used for superfetch - which I agree is a great thing to finally see Windows doing - is above and beyond that 500MB.
  • 2girls1cup (Score:4, Funny)

    by AikonMGB (1013995) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:10AM (#21667543) Homepage

    I would setup a dedicated box with XP on it that would just sit their with their spy software installed and 2girls1cup running on replay. Stuff it in the basement and forget about it for three months :D

    Aikon-

    • with their spy software installed and 2girls1cup running on replay

      oh god.. I didnt need to see that.... why do I have to be so curious and google everything I don't know about :'(
  • by definate (876684) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:25AM (#21667647)
    Something FREE! That's good!

    Vista Ultimate? That's bad!

    Monitoring? That's bad!

    Can I downgrade it to Windows XP Pro and get a free Windows XP Pro license that's legit? That'd be good! ...

    Just seems you can't even give Vista away.
  • by terrible76 (855014)
    Sounds like its not free, but a way to save money instead of paying someone to test the software bugs. Give it away and just don't call it Beta testing. I think its more complicated and business wise then just spyware.
  • Note that the site mentions that comScore is part of the Windows Feedback Program. ("Microsoft, comScore, and MarketTools employees are not eligible to participate.") Also note that comScore has in the past been involved in very pernicious man-in-the-middle HTTPS attacks [stanford.edu] that have allowed them to sniff bank passwords (and everything else, of course) by installing a special certificate in end-user's browsers. If it were me, I wouldn't install any executables that may have been authored by comScore until the
  • by Zorque (894011) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:43AM (#21667791)
    At least it's completely voluntary and you make ~$400 off of it. Why are people getting upset that Microsoft is paying you for providing them with information? It's not like it's mandatory for Windows users.
    • That putting this up as a program isn't horrible so long as it is totally voluntary and glaringly obvious (though saying 'it's not spyware' in a faq answer is kind of disingenuous') However, saying you make ~$400 off of it is not a good characterization. First off, $400 is the MSRP of Vista Ultimate retail box, without upgrade. If you can participate in this program, first you'd likely be qualified for the upgrade cost. Secondly, OEM pricing is an option if not intending to 'upgrade' your current system
  • ...that Vista is so bad Microsoft had to give it away to get people to use it.
  • Make it productive. (Score:5, Interesting)

    by rantingkitten (938138) <kitten@nOspAm.mirrorshades.org> on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:49AM (#21667827) Homepage
    Why not install this on a couple VMs (or actual machines sitting around) and then install all kinds of free software on it? Let them chew on the fact that so many people, straight away after installing, go get Firefox and Open Office and GIMP and VLC and Thunderbird and Pidgin.. and never bother using IE or Office or whatever else. Make sure they also see all the useless services you disable and how quickly you can shut off UAC.

  • by FliesLikeABrick (943848) <ryan@u13.net> on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:50AM (#21667835)
    I tried to sign up so that I could run my free XP in a virtual machine with this spy software of theirs and see exactly what kind of stuff it reports. I didn't realize they were out of "gifts" and completed their survey before realizing this. I went through the survey and answered their questions honestly, saying that I use Linux and never use Windows anymore. 5 minutes later, I wanted to remove myself from their database for this so that I don't get e-mails in the future related to it when I have no involvement with it whatsoever... being that they had no more software to give out and all.

    I looked on their FAQ page and found conflicting information. Two separate sections saying to send a blank e-mail to two different e-mail addresses with 'remove' in the subject. I e-mailed both, and what did I get in return?

    I did that. What did I get back? Two NDRs for separate reasons:

    : host maila.microsoft.com[131.107.115.212] said: 550
            5.7.1 (in reply to end of DATA command)

    -- and --

    : host maila.microsoft.com[131.107.115.212] said: 550
            5.1.1 User unknown (in reply to RCPT TO command)

    Good one MS, you never cease to amaze me!
  • by Asmor (775910) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:52AM (#21667853) Homepage
    Glad to see that you guys don't let facts get in the way of a good MS bash.

    Anyways, just in the in case there's anyone actually curious about this and not just interested in kneejerk reactions about poorly-written, inflammatory summary.

    I've actually RTFA (and a page linked off of it) and here's something the summary completely neglects to mention:

    The automated data collection is one of two different options you can pick; the other is to be asked to fill out a survey not more often than once every two weeks. It sounds like you can pick either option.

    Now, that all said, there's also one more big thing: They're giving away FREE copies of EXPENSIVE software* which many people NEED** or WANT with a perfectly reasonable caveat. They're being open and honest, and they're providing both a manual and an automatic method of data collection. The latter is particularly appealing to many, because it basically means they can just forget about it. Those who are worried about their privacy can take the surveys.

    Disclaimer: I am a fanboy of many things, including Xbox 360, but not Microsoft in general. I like Windows XP and hate most everything that MS has put out which isn't an OS (i.e. office, internet explorer, etc). I'll definitely not be participating simply because I'm not interested in any of the offerings.

    *Expensive for a typical end user, I don't care how much your company paid for its graphics design software
    **Again, typical end user who doesn't know what OpenOffice is and just wants to be able to open their files at work without thinking about converting file types.
    • by jkrise (535370)
      Now, that all said, there's also one more big thing: They're giving away FREE copies of EXPENSIVE software* which many people NEED** or WANT with a perfectly reasonable caveat. They're being open and honest, and they're providing both a manual and an automatic method of data collection. The latter is particularly appealing to many, because it basically means they can just forget about it. Those who are worried about their privacy can take the surveys.

      More EXPENSIVE does not automatically mean MORE COVET
      • by Asmor (775910)
        I don't know why I'm bothering to reply to you, since it's obvious you didn't read a damn word I said except for the capitalized ones.

        You're right that being expensive does not equate to being desired or necessary, and I never said it did.

        All I said was that many people do need or want Microsoft software, and the expense of that software is thus a salient point to make.

        Also, as mentioned, they are offering you options, and you're not required to use their monitoring software to participate.

        Now, if you'd lik
    • by MrNougat (927651)

      The automated data collection is one of two different options you can pick; the other is to be asked to fill out a survey not more often than once every two weeks. It sounds like you can pick either option.


      Wrong. You have to fill out a 15 minute questionnaire up front, then download and install the software.

  • ...and after only 3,283 people sign up, we'll finally have the proof that...

    ...Microsoft can't -- give -- Vista away.
  • by Comatose51 (687974) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @12:57AM (#21667877) Homepage
    I can't believe all the cynical responses from Slashdot readers. Why would you doubt the sincerity and generosity of the company found by the man who will donate $100 to an orphanage each time I forward his email to someone?
  • The Catch (Score:4, Funny)

    by popo (107611) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @01:03AM (#21667915) Homepage

    "The caveat is that you have to let them monitor your use of the program"

    So they'll monitor my activities when I sell it on eBay?

  • Under Wine.... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by themacks (1197889) <markmccarthy AT gatech DOT edu> on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @01:10AM (#21667943) Homepage
    Out of morbid curiosity I had to know, and it installed just fine. Thankfully it uninstalled just fine too.

    I wonder what kind of "useful" data Wine reports...
  • "The caveat is that you have to let them monitor your use of the program."

    So how does this make the free copy any different than the one you pay for? Just askin'.

  • by aeSentinel (1197425) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @01:43AM (#21668111)
    ...Satan is giving away free money. The caveat is that you have to give him your soul.
  • by geekoid (135745) <dadinportland AT yahoo DOT com> on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @02:21AM (#21668255) Homepage Journal
    That way I would have known it was a MS shill trying to get people to go through the setup tool and not realizing that MS stopped giving anything away 6.5 hours BEFORE this was posted.
  • by Tim C (15259) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @02:47AM (#21668385)
    So what, I shouldn't have the right to voluntarily enter in to this sort of an agreement with a company? They shouldn't have the right to invite people to do so?

    Help me out here guys, I'm trying to see what right is involved.
  • No free software (Score:4, Informative)

    by john_p_peach (1113589) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @03:45AM (#21668643)
    The agreement that you read says the M$ will provide all the software for free. However, after you find out

    What happened to the free product option? Thank you for your interest in the feedback program. Due to overwhelming response, the supply of gifts has been exhausted so we have closed our free product offer on 12/11/2007 at 2pm Pacific Time. Thanks to everyone that participated!
    Surprise surprise microsoft is being misleading. Also, the FAQ says that in order to opt-out you just send a message to winsurv@microsoft.com but when you do the message bounces with

    I'm afraid I wasn't able to deliver your message to the following addresses. This is a permanent error; I've given up. Sorry it didn't work out. : 205.248.106.30 does not like recipient. Remote host said: 550 5.1.1 User unknown Giving up on 205.248.106.30.
    So you cannot ever get out of the programme after you find out that microsoft was screwed you.
  • I was interested in it, just because I believe that MS collects information on me anyway when I use Windows, so why not get a free copy?

    From the privacy statement fineprint, they say what information they are collecting.

    "This information includes, but is not limited to:"

    Then they give a list of "harmless" things such as driver types, hardware, errors encountered. But where is the "not limited to" list? Can't find it on the site. They really don't want you to know what they are collecting.

    And, of course, Office has its own set of things, which you helpfully have to look for yourself:

    To display the privacy statement for Office 2003, please search for "Privacy Statement" in Office 2003 online help.

    Plus, the Windows Customer Experience Improvement Program has its own set of things it collects.

    Very Big Brother. Then again, most of my information is already out there floating around... Might be nice to have a free copy of Vista.....

    • I'm no MS fanboy but hey, lets not get all emotional. If your company was putting out a similar offer for your own software your lawyers would be damn sure too to put "not limited to" after the list of data being collected. Its a standard legal phrase that you use unless you actually a) do have the complete, exhaustive list of what will be collected, and b) you are utterly confidnt that if someone changes what is collected that you will hear about it and get to change the terms of use.
  • Good idea (Score:4, Insightful)

    by unoengborg (209251) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @04:57AM (#21668915) Homepage
    This will give Microsoft valuable information that will help them develop better software in the future. The quesiton is how many users are prepared to trust them enough to allow this. But as it is comleatly volentary I see no problem in doing so, other than that they may get some biased results as people that value privacy and security most likely will not participate. However, personally, I wourld like to be paid a little more than just with some free software to do this kind of testing for Microsoft.

    I would actually like to see open source projects such as Gnome and KDE to do a similar thing (As long as it is volentary). Knowing how the users use their is essential to create good usable systems, and very few usability tests are performed on software in the FOSS world, so something like this would probably be even more beneficial to these kind of projects. I would also think that more people would be prepared to volontear this kind information to e.g. the KDE or Gnome team than they would to big evil Microsoft. After all very few Gnome or KDE users would worry about that a big evil company might discover unlicenced software on their systems.
  • by Swift Kick (240510) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @05:06AM (#21668949)
    From an email just received (2:05AM 12/12/07):

    What happened to the free product option?

    Thank you for your interest in the feedback program. Due to overwhelming response, the supply of gifts has been exhausted so we have closed our free product offer on 12/11/2007 at 2pm Pacific Time. Thanks to everyone that participated!
  • by stewbacca (1033764) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @07:17AM (#21669487)
    As someone who cares not one bit about my "privacy", I'd love to see more of these types of deals. The only thing that makes me wary when dealing with "privacy" is I prefer not to be spammed for the rest of my life. I could, however, give a flyin' f*&k if anyone is monitoring what I do on my computer. If you are monitoring me, be prepared to be bored to tears.
  • by aldousd666 (640240) on Wednesday December 12, 2007 @08:46AM (#21669987) Journal
    We'll be able to point, laugh, and say that "Microsoft can't even GIVE Vista away." I'm not a microsoft hater either, but vista is a colossal foobar. I work in an IT shop, and I've had to have it installed because I'm required to be one version ahead of deployment whenever possible, and I've hated every bleeding minute of Vista Enterprise. I even had to change settings to get it to hit our NAS shares, which are essentially samba shares on a huge redhat fronted storage device. (Incidentally XP hadn't any issues out of the box with it.)

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