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U.S. Puts 12 Nations On Watch For Piracy 429

Posted by Zonk
from the colbert-angry-wants-board-back dept.
ColinPL writes with a link to an AP article about a public scolding the US has given China, Russia, and several other nations. Failure to 'sufficiently protect' American copyrights is the cause of the Bush administration's ire, and has resulted in these countries showing up on a 'priority watch list' that could eventually lead to economic sanctions. "In addition to Russia and China, the 10 countries placed on the priority watch list were Argentina, Chile, Egypt, India, Israel, Lebanon, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine and Venezuela. In elevating Thailand to the priority watch list, the administration said it was concerned by a range of issues including a 'deteriorating protection for patents and copyrights.' Thailand is currently in a dispute with international drug companies including Abbott Laboratories of the United States over the cost of drugs to fight AIDS and other diseases. The Thai government in January issued compulsory licenses allowing the use of much cheaper generic versions of two leading drugs in Thailand."
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U.S. Puts 12 Nations On Watch For Piracy

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  • That told them! (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Threni (635302) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @07:41AM (#18939161)
    If only China and Russia were big enough to not give a shit about US policy...
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward
      I'm just surprised Canada and the UK aren't on the list, given all the piracy that goes on there. It's almost like this list has nothing to do with piracy.
      • what about all the piracy that goes on in the states.
        • by Fuzzums (250400) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @08:06AM (#18939397) Homepage
          That's called free enterprise.
          Everyboy knows that! Duh! C'mon. ;)
      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by azemute (890775)
        Well... Canada was. Not the UK however.

        The countries placed on a lower-level watch list were Belarus, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Hungary, Indonesia, Italy, Jamaica, South Korea, Kuwait, Lithuania, Malaysia, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Vietnam.
      • Re:That told them! (Score:4, Insightful)

        by elrous0 (869638) * on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @09:11AM (#18940237)
        Yeah, you'd almost think that Thailand's addition just had something to do with they way they've bypassed the major pharmaceutical companies. But that would mean that our political leaders were just serving the ends of the pharmaceutical companies, not the American people or the law. And surely that can't be the case, not with our noble leaders and their "family values," "character," and such.
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by Kjella (173770)
          I think it has just as much to do with predictability. Good or bad, they know where most coutries stand. Thailand's compulsory licenses suddenly means the IP owners are no longer in control. They can just turn around at any moment and grant a compulsory license like allofmp3 has had in Russia, and the US IP revenue would go down the toilet. While it's not technically piracy, I have no doubt that's why they're on the "pressue these governments to change and enforce IP policy" list.
      • Re:That told them! (Score:4, Insightful)

        by kripkenstein (913150) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @10:09AM (#18941171) Homepage
        As someone that lives in Israel, let me say, I am not surprised at all that it's on the list. What is ironic though is that there are so many IT companies here. This seems to show that you don't need strong IP laws to maintain a strong IT industry. Although, granted, most sales of Israeli IT companies are overseas; I don't know what proportion go to strong-IP-law countries, though.
        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Anonymous Coward
          Complete and utter nonsense. The amount of software piracy here in Israel is comparable to that in, e.g., the UK, France or Ireland.

          The reason that Israel is on the list is completely different: Teva, which -- allegedly -- in its research, does not respect American pharmaceutical patents, and is one of the world's largest generic drugs companies. American pharma companies wage a battle against Teva for many years now. Teva's success is causing American companies losses in many billions (way beyond what Teva
      • by Cathoderoytube (1088737) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @10:38AM (#18941627)
        I think the reason Canada and the UK aren't on the list is because we're close neighbors with the US. In Canada's case we actually touch them. I'm not a political type person but I have an idea it would be bad for relations if the US went out and said 'Canada! you're on our list!' then we'd say 'Which list is that? The one for the terrorists, the beef, the lumber, the drugs or the flying squirrels?' then the US would say 'This is a new list! For not protecting our copyrights!' then we'd say 'Copyrights.. That's a new one is it?' then the US would say 'YES! We just made it! And you're on it! Right there below Venezuela!' then we'd say 'Wait what? We're still talking about copyrights here right? This list looks an awful lot like it has something to do with soccer. I think your list is wrong, we're more of a hockey country' then the US would say 'That's not true, your woman's team is quite good'. Then we'd say 'Well I suppose, but the fact of the matter remains we're really not known for our soccer' then the US would say 'You do have a valid point, we'll take you off the list.. '

        So, uhh there you go.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Soch (188557)
        I've lived in Canada, and I live currently in Israel. While I don't know about the UK, or the other countries on the list, I can most certainly tell you that Canadians don't pirate anywhere near as much as Israelis. A lot of that has to do with enfocement, too.

        Just as an example, you can walk into any major bus station in Israel and find a store that sells exclusively copied CDs and DVDs. It will take the police months to close them down, and take their inventory away, but in that time they've made so mu
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Kpau (621891)
        I saw the headline and thought.... oh, we have countries sympathetic or turning a blind eye to "HIGH SEAS NAVAL" piracy. Serious stuff, you know, with guns and RPGs ... not a small family vendor stall with a DVD duplicator. The word "piracy" has been hijacked by numbnuts....
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      If only China and Russia were big enough to not give a shit about US policy...

      The real joke is putting Israel on the list. Even if the US were to fine them they'd just get more US taxpayer money sent in the next lot of "foreign aid".
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by AuxLV (748687)
      LOL, China and Russia already don't give a shit. Especially China. How can USA put economic sanctions on China? It is China who can put sanctions on USA. Just imagine China stops selling all electric devices and components to USA - electronical apocalipse will destroy America in a few months. Bush and his administration is a bunch of lols!
  • by gardyloo (512791) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @07:43AM (#18939199)
    ... anyone have a .torrent of it?
  • Let's be honest (Score:5, Insightful)

    by halivar (535827) <bfelger.gmail@com> on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @07:43AM (#18939201) Homepage
    This isn't just the Bush administration. If you vote for either of the Big Two, the person you voted for has been bought and paid for by the MAFIAA, and they are in full support of sending the copyright Gestapo after law-breakers worldwide.
    • Re:Let's be honest (Score:5, Informative)

      by morgan_greywolf (835522) * on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @07:51AM (#18939265) Homepage Journal

      This isn't just the Bush administration. If you vote for either of the Big Two, the person you voted for has been bought and paid for by the MAFIAA, and they are in full support of sending the copyright Gestapo after law-breakers worldwide.


      Except that they can't do much. Sure, the U.S. government can impose economic sanctions on non-compliant countries, but that only takes you so far. The U.S. Constitution requires that the federal government respect the sovereignty of foreign nations. U.S. courts won't typically touch a copyright infringement case if the infringement occurs overseas.

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        The U.S. Constitution requires that the federal government respect the sovereignty of foreign nations.
        Guess that worked pretty well over the last 150 or so years, where dozens of countries were trampled over by the USA, in some cases bringing chaos, violence and death to those countries.
      • Re:Let's be honest (Score:5, Insightful)

        by jimicus (737525) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @08:24AM (#18939627)
        The U.S. Constitution requires that the federal government respect the sovereignty of foreign nations.

        That's odd, because I could have sworn Iraq was a foreign nation with its own sovreign government until a few years ago.
      • by houghi (78078)

        Except that they can't do much. Sure, the U.S. government can impose economic sanctions on non-compliant countries, but that only takes you so far.


        The US has invaded countries for no reason at all. At least now they would have an excuse.
      • Re:Let's be honest (Score:5, Insightful)

        by owlnation (858981) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @08:43AM (#18939873)

        Except that they can't do much. Sure, the U.S. government can impose economic sanctions on non-compliant countries, but that only takes you so far.
        True, and certainly in China's case - who will this hurt exactly? What percentage of US goods are in fact manufactured in China? Quite a large one I'll bet, certainly a significant one. Similarly, Turkey doesn't really need the US, but the US really does need Turkey as a base.

        The fact is, speaking as a European, nobody outside the US gives a damn about US laws. In fact, we find attempts like this to assert themselves legally, to be rather lame and sad. It's just hot air and rhetoric for the voters back home I guess

        Anyway, in the highly improbable event that any of these countries paid any attention the the US on piracy and actually stopped it, there's still be many other countries to which pirates could easily and successfully move to. There's also plenty of piracy from within US borders too.

        The only way to beat piracy is to include fair use in copyright - assuming copyright needs to exist at all.

        The *IAA needs to develop new business models or simply die - those are the only two choices available.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by asuffield (111848)

      This isn't just the Bush administration. If you vote for either of the Big Two, the person you voted for has been bought and paid for by the MAFIAA, and they are in full support of sending the copyright Gestapo after law-breakers worldwide.

      This is very true - however, the Bush administration is notable in their "every other country must do what we say" attitude. Even for the US, their arrogance is astounding. Most past administrations have been rather less willing to spend what little diplomatic advantages

      • by mpe (36238)
        I cannot imagine why they think that issuing public orders to China is going to get them anything other than a lot of very pissed off Chinese. This little stunt has probably ensured that China will not be doing anything about copyright complaints from US corporations, just so that the Chinese leaders can show they don't take orders from the US.

        It's not as if there is much the US can do to threaten China. Any trade sanctions would hurt the US more and an military threat has the "problem" that the Chinese c
    • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @08:35AM (#18939761)
      You can't spell DMCA without the "D".... [opensecrets.org]

      Yep, the entertainment industry gives at least twice as much to Democrats as they do to Republicans. Since 1990, they've given $137,219,474 to Dems, and $63,574,385 to Repubs.

      The recording industry is even more skewed [opensecrets.org], giving $13,635,639 to Dems and $3,727,147 to Repubs since 1990. That's 78% to Dems - with some election cycles having 85% of the recording industries political contributions going to Dems.

      But that's nothing compared to the movie industry [opensecrets.org], which gave $47,800,285 to Dems and $7,192,062 to Repubs since 1990. Up to 93% of movie industry political contributions have gone to Dems in some election cycles, with that number never lower than 78%.

      There's a reason why the DMCA was signed by a Democratic President. Hell, there are millions of reasons, all of them green...

      The cognitive dissonance among sheltered /. basement-dwellers that this post is going to cause will be funny.
      • by scruffy (29773)

        Mod the parent up.

        This is more about money from the "mafiaa" than effective policy.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Bogtha (906264)

        Yep, the entertainment industry gives at least twice as much to Democrats as they do to Republicans. Since 1990, they've given $137,219,474 to Dems, and $63,574,385 to Repubs.

        So basically, what you are saying is that Republicans are cheaper to bribe? </facetious>

        Quit trying to make this a "my team is better than yours" issue. Halivar was saying that both Republicans and Democrats are corrupt, and he was right.

        The cognitive dissonance among sheltered /. basement-dwellers that this post

  • USA (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @07:47AM (#18939229)
    Dear United STATES of AMERICA.

    You have your own part of the world. Please stay within it's boundaries and spend the saved time READING Wikipedia's article on law. You DO NOT and SHALL NOT ever control other nations laws. You cannot even abide by the very laws you were founded on these days, so why do you expect others to do the same?

    Lots of love
    Rest of the world.
    • I'm not so sure about the "you do not" bit in the following from your post:

      You DO NOT and SHALL NOT ever control other nations laws

      WIPO pretty much propagates what the US congress lays down in law. To take the section on Egypt asan example in the Special 301 Report, the country is being egged on to sign on and apply WIPO.

      US free trade zones also carry very strict IP enforcement agreements as strings, and yet developing nations still fall over themselves to hop on board with these.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by suv4x4 (956391)
      You cannot even abide by the very laws you were founded on these days, so why do you expect others to do the same?

      Here's the only law that ever worked: everybody can take a shot.

      If USA has mechanisms to pressure other countries, it'll do so. If it has ability to avoid its own laws, it'll do so. It took a shot and succeeded.

      Laws are only as strong as the mechanisms built to withstand them. Interests and power always will achieve more.
  • I wonder (Score:2, Insightful)

    If anyone realizes that having an economy that is increasingly dependent on "intellectual property" is a bad thing. Nowadays there is no compelling reason to buy things from the copyright holders other than maybe feeling guilty or an affinity for tangible copies. ESPECIALLY since the pirated versions often are much better than the retail versions in functionality and portability.
    • Re:I wonder (Score:5, Insightful)

      by malsdavis (542216) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @08:35AM (#18939771)
      It is indeed a strange twist when the pirated versions are better than the originals.

      I noticed this absurdity last week when I had to download a pirated version of a CD I had just bought so that I could actually play it in my car.

      Utterly absurd and needless to say, the next album I want I will downloading (via illegal sources of course, those legal sources are the worst of all).
      • by malsdavis (542216)
        "Utterly absurd and needless to say, the next album I want I will be downloading."

        Oops, it seems even previewing a comment doesn't always stop typos.
    • by Garwulf (708651) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @08:38AM (#18939821) Homepage
      "If anyone realizes that having an economy that is increasingly dependent on "intellectual property" is a bad thing. Nowadays there is no compelling reason to buy things from the copyright holders other than maybe feeling guilty or an affinity for tangible copies. ESPECIALLY since the pirated versions often are much better than the retail versions in functionality and portability."

      Wow - now that's a gross over-generalization, and only part of the first sentence is even close to right here...

      Going back to front (sort of):

      "Nowadays there is no compelling reason to buy things from the copyright holders other than maybe feeling guilty or an affinity for tangible copies."

      To meet one gross over-generalization with another, you mean besides keeping the copyright holders in business so that they can continue to produce content? There's a basic economic reality you're missing here - producing any product or content takes time and resources, and to continue to do that requires that money is made to pay for the time and resources.

      (And, before somebody bites my head off, yes, I know the internet is a cheap means of distribution, and yes, I know the RIAA treats its content creators horribly - I'm talking in the broadest of strokes here. When it comes down to it, any content creator needs to at least eat.)

      But, you know what, you're right - we don't need that pesky literature, movies, and music anyway. If shadow puppets were good enough for our ancestors, they're good enough for us!

      "ESPECIALLY since the pirated versions often are much better than the retail versions in functionality and portability."

      Um, no, not really. Windows Vista is DRM-happy to the point of stupidity, and the RIAA has done everything it can to drive music fans into the hands of file-sharers, but that doesn't mean that the greater utility lies in files on a computer. Actually, in most cases a physical media tends to have better functionality and portability.

      Take movies for example - I can go visit my parents in another city and bring a couple of movies along, and the DVDs are quite light, easy to carry, and all I have to do is put them into any DVD player in North America to have them work. No file copying, no waiting for a download to finish, no taking up space on my hard disk - everything is just on the DVD. When it comes to the DRM stupidity we have been seeing, we have to remember that it's the DRM causing the problems, not the physical format itself.

      "If anyone realizes that having an economy that is increasingly dependent on "intellectual property" is a bad thing."

      This is the one place where you are at least partially correct. But you shouldn't be saying "intellectual property" here - you should be saying "service-based," because that is what is really there. The United States used to have some of the greatest manufacturing power in the world, and now it seems it actually produces very little. But that's a more complicated argument, and not really relevant to this discussion.
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward
        keeping the copyright holders in business so that they can continue to produce content?

        As long as there is money to be made , the Paris Hiltons and Britney's of the world will continue to produce "content". If they would stop, good riddance.

        There was "content producers" long before there were copyrights (think cave men) and I predict there will be "content producers" long after copyrights are void.

        Giving Disney Corporation 100+ years of copyright is not necessary for Disney Corporation to produce new cont
      • >>content creators I didn't say 'creators' I said copyright holders, these are very rarely the same people. People produced content for hundreds of years before copyright cartels and any copyright law. >>Take movies for example... I can store ~6 movies on a single layered DVD. I can store Hundreds of full ISOs on a single hard drive. I can play a .avi or .mkv file anywhere on the planet. This is coming from someone who DOES have an affinity for physical copies, physical copies will always be
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Garwulf (708651)
          "I didn't say 'creators' I said copyright holders, these are very rarely the same people. People produced content for hundreds of years before copyright cartels and any copyright law."

          1. In my business (writing), most often the copyright holder is the content creator. And there are plenty of patents that are held by the people who created the invention.

          2. Before copyright law, there were wealthy patrons. Copyright law serves an important purpose in a free market economy. This is verbatim from another of
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by steelfood (895457)
        The only way to eventually make money off IP without DRM (and even with) in the digital age is to offer value-added services.

        For example, watching a movie on the big screen over watching it at home. Going out with friends, maybe have dinner before or after, perhaps a drink (before or after). People do this already. Perhaps that's why the MPAA isn't nearly as concerned about piracy, with some rare exceptions.

        For music, there's nothing like actually going to a concert. So instead of using CD's to make money,
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by marcosdumay (620877)

        "But you shouldn't be saying "intellectual property" here - you should be saying "service-based," because that is what is really there."

        There is no problem with a service based economy. Most of the world is changing from a production based to a service based one, and most people are happy with that.

        The problem is when you want to sell the same, easily replicated product by a large margin and expect everybody to be nice and buy it from you.

  • The third world (Score:4, Interesting)

    by n3tcat (664243) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @07:49AM (#18939245) Homepage
    I remember on my camp in Kuwait, the TCNs (third-world country nationals) would come on to clean, and would also stop by our living quarters with a truck load of burned dvds and vcds for a few bucks a pop. And this was very often. I know it was even worse up in Iraq, with people ripping and burning movies to sell on the markets all the time.

    So these other countries must be doing this in huge quantities to be on this list. It's rather impressive really.
    • Re:The third world (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Heir Of The Mess (939658) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @08:27AM (#18939659) Homepage

      I think you will find that there are factories in China making pirate DVDs that get shipped in bulk to just about every other country in the world. There are factories in Hong Kong that start printing the retail DVDs to stock up for the retail release, of course this printing is done while the movie is still in theatres, but often theses Hong Kong factories are also the source of the early DVD rips where rogue employees get a copy out of the factory somehow.

      Counterfeiting is also big in China. There they even managed to set up a whole fake NEC organisation that was buying from the same suppliers that the real NEC did, see http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/04/27/business/ne c.php [iht.com]. They even print foreign food labels and put in on local produce. It's amazing stuff. There was even a case where they set up a car factory right next to a GM factory and were churning out the same car. Check this out http://www.automotoportal.com/article/chinese-rip- offs-of-western-automakers [automotoportal.com] Makes a truck of burnt DVDs look like childs play.

  • Failure to 'sufficiently protect' American copyrights is the cause of the Bush administration's ire ...

    Which, five or six years ago, might have meant something. Today, it doesn't. Can't imagine why that might be.

  • What? No Canada? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by BladedThoth (978066) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @07:51AM (#18939263)
    After the MPAA threw it's hissy-fit tantrum a while back about how Canada is the #1 place for movie piracy because it's where screen records come from, that they're thinking of delaying out movie release for weeks, yada yada yada, Canada doesn't make it anywhere on the list? Heh. Maybe the federal government isn't quite as stupid about what the *AAs are doing as they typically act like.
    • We made it on a second tier list along with the likes of:
      Belarus, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Hungary, Indonesia, Italy, Jamaica, South Korea, Kuwait, Lithuania, Malaysia, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Vietnam.

      Well I'll have none of this second best business. Fire up the torrents! We'll show those Peruvians who the real pirates are!
      • by Splab (574204)
        How come Sweden doesn't get on that list? I mean they harbor the biggest tracker, and they got a pirate party. I call hoax!
    • by MadJo (674225)
      But wouldn't delaying the movie releases actually increase the use of illegally obtained copyrighted material in Canada?
      • In that situation, it was 20th Century Fox issuing some bald faced lies that Canada is the source of 112% of the world's handicam rips (it isn't) and that it wasn't illegal here (it is) and that if nothing changed they start withholding new theatrical releases (they won't).

        All the while ignoring the fact that handicam rips are only actually about 1% of the problem.
  • ..and Russia, China, Argentina, Chile, Egypt, India, Israel, Lebanon, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine and Venezuela are all on notice! [shipbrook.com] That'll learn 'em.
  • it was offshore banking. The US blacklisted a number of countries, and ruined their economies. Now it's "IP". Thank you for bringing freedom to the world.
    • "Blacklisted and ruined their economies" is an interesting perspective. To which nations you refer is not immediately apparent. When offshore banking [wikipedia.org] was perceived to be merely the province of people seeking to reduce their tax load, the industry was largely ignored. It seems some of that activity wasn't even illegal, the industry helped people to exploit loopholes.

      One could say the industry was exploited as an anonymous money laundering service by tax evaders, drug kingpins (not to be confused with
  • by Dorkmaster Flek (1013045) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @07:54AM (#18939293)
    Could that have anything to do with the fact that we just caved [michaelgeist.ca] to US lobbyist pressure to buy some goodwill?
  • Piracy? (Score:4, Informative)

    by treehouse (781426) * on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @07:54AM (#18939295)
    Even /. has bought into calling copyright infringement "piracy". If you don't think it's the moral equivalent of murder on the high seas, then don't use the RIAA term "piracy". You just play into their hands.
    • Even /. has bought into calling copyright infringement "piracy". If you don't think it's the moral equivalent of murder on the high seas, then don't use the RIAA term "piracy". You just play into their hands.

      First of all, piracy [wikipedia.org] is not murder on the high seas, it's robbery on the high seas. Secondly, language is constantly evolving. A word that means one thing one day, may mean something else later. "Gay", for example, means light-hearted and happy. However, it now also means effeminate, homosexual,
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Kjella (173770)
        So, rage all you want. You will never get "piracy" back. Nor will we get "hacker" back. It's a lost battle.

        And on top of all the other reasons, calling copyright infringement "cop-y-right in-fringe-ment" sucks because it's six syllabels, whereas "pi-ra-cy" is three syllables and "pi-rate" two.

        piracy <=> copyright infringement
        pirated <=> copyright infringing
        pirate <=> infringe on copyright (verb)
        pirate <=> copyright infringer (noun)

        Now I'm not saying the word has to be "pirate", but t
  • by prakslash (681585) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @07:56AM (#18939319)
    I, for one, welcome this.

    These countries can do everything cheaper as seen with off-shored outsourcing and all.
    The only edge the US has is innovation.

    If these countries can just copy everything and do it dirt cheap, it will harm entities in the US who spend money on innovation - be it pharmaceuticals, music or software.

    I think a bit of personal not-for-profit p2p downloading and an exception for life-saving drugs in OK. But, the balatant disregard for copyrights and patents with businesses in these countries openly copying and selling pharmaceuticals, software and music should be stopped.

    • by tomstdenis (446163) <tomstdenis@@@gmail...com> on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @08:02AM (#18939363) Homepage
      You do realize that in most [not all] of these countries the people make in a year what most of us make in a month [or two]? right? Buying a 25$ movie may be nothing to people in the states or Canada, but is a big deal for many else.

      Unless the mafiaa is willing to sell movies and CDs for dirt cheap they should expect piracy. let's see, I make about 70K and am willing to spend 25$ on a movie [if it's really good, otherwise I hover around $10]. These people make $7-10K so how about charge them $3 for the same movie. No? Ok, expect piracy.

      And frankly if you stake your financial security on nations where the average income is $200 a month, chances are you should rethink your business plan.

      Tom
    • by Znork (31774)
      "The only edge the US has is innovation."

      Right. You do realize there's nothing stopping those corporates from registering the patents in the US and doing the research in cheaper countries? The idea that the west has an 'innovation edge' these days is, frankly, mostly a comfort blanket, and strong 'IP' support doesnt protect jobs, it merely increases prices for the local market. Which in turn kills jobs.

      Saying those countries should introduce their own monopolies because the US cant compete would be like the
    • by A beautiful mind (821714) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @08:15AM (#18939507)

      I think a bit of personal not-for-profit p2p downloading and an exception for life-saving drugs in OK. But, the balatant disregard for copyrights and patents with businesses in these countries openly copying and selling pharmaceuticals, software and music should be stopped.
      So you're saying that just because the USA can't come up with a working economy, it resorts to hijacking a mechanism from the 18th century to try to control what every rational human being would classify as ideas that belong to everyone. Like the RIAA, the USA Govt. should learn the lesson too: come up with a working business model/economy or roll over.
    • I, for one, welcome this.

      These countries can do everything cheaper as seen with off-shored outsourcing and all. The only edge the US has is innovation.

      If these countries can just copy everything and do it dirt cheap, it will harm entities in the US who spend money on innovation - be it pharmaceuticals, music or software.

      And western countries can impose arbitrary economic restrictions, meddle in our internal politics, exploit our work forces and natural resources to maximize your profits. But hey!, we

  • In the brazillian newspaper "Estado de Sao Paulo", there is an articles entitled Brasil leaves the top of the american list for piracy [estadao.com.br] (free form translation)

    In the article, it says there was an announcement in the United States last Monday in which it was said that Brazil was removed from the top most part of the list of countries that ignore piracy and violate intellectual property.

    Funny thing in the article is to read that they found out that Brazil didn't manufacture the products that were confiscat

  • Thailand? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Don_dumb (927108) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @08:02AM (#18939365)
    Copying drugs to fight AIDS and other diseases.

    Those bastards!
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by roman_mir (125474)
      Copying drugs to fight AIDS and other diseases.

      Those bastards!
      - let's say I am working on my own project in a garage to try and find cure for some weird disease, let's say I am trying to remove the HIV from a human. Let's say I succeed.

      I do not see a single reason to allow anyone to copy my work without my permission and without being paid for it. In fact if I did find such a cure I wouldn't even sell it through pharma firms, I would open my own hospital, where I would accept those, who can afford the tr
  • Israel (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Secrity (742221) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @08:02AM (#18939371)
    I find it very interesting that Israel is on the list as it is the only country on the list that could really be affected by US sanctions.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by PHPfanboy (841183)
      This is largely from lobbying by US pharmaceutical companies due to competition from Israeli generic drug manufacturers.
      • So what? Since when are generic drugs considered illegal piracy? I still don't understand why Israel is on the list, we do not have rampant piracy here and there aren't shady stands selling pirated CDs in street corners. I could find no further explanation in TFA nor in the USTR website. Does anyone have any information on this?
    • by mpe (36238)
      I find it very interesting that Israel is on the list as it is the only country on the list that could really be affected by US sanctions.

      Given that the Israeli economy is effectivly kept solvent by the US in the first place. However can you really see the US Government changing their (longstanding) policy to providing Israel with cash (and weapons)?
      • by Secrity (742221)
        "However can you really see the US Government changing their (longstanding) policy to providing Israel with cash (and weapons)?"

        That was actually my point; the only country on the list that could be affected by sanctions won't be sanctioned.
      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by attributor (1095041)
        Not really -- a 140 billion dollar Israeli economy is not kept solvent by 2.4 billion in military aid and 50 million dollars in other aid.

        BTW, 2.4 billion military aid comes with a clause that Israel has to purchase for this money
        weapon systems from the US alone.

        This effectively removes 2.4 billion out of the military budget that might be spent on
        Israeli manufacturers with excellent reputation and potential competition for the
        US arms industry.

        Also 2.4 is small change to maintain the balance of force with 2
  • Bush Logic (Score:4, Insightful)

    by SlantyBard (1040070) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @08:03AM (#18939373)
    Ok, they want to put Thailand on this list partly because Thailand has told them we are only going to pay a certain amount for anti-viral HIV medication instead of the hugely inflated US prices. Seems to me that saves US dollars in the end because it is US men (and other westerners too) going over for underage sex with potentially HIV infected girls which if treated appropriately would keep US healthcare costs down by decreasing transmission to US citizens.
  • While in the case of providing a free market you could argue that it is generally a good thing that democratic systems should have, but copyright is just a mean to an end, to try to bolster innovation. Needless to say it is a laughable 18th century relic, but nonetheless it is a tool.

    Saying to another country that you're not protecting copyrights enough, is a sovereignty issue. It would be equivalent to saying that another country using this or that kind of philosophy in helping the economy is bad and sho
  • ..they forgot to put the US on the watch list. Considering the computer userbase here, the "amount" of piracy might be higher than in any of those countries, or even all of them taken together. Here's some numbers for you: Ukraine Internet Users: 5.278 Million (2005) Russia Internet Users: 23.7 Million (2005) China Internet Users: 123 Million (2006) India Internet Users: 60 Million (2005) United States Internet Users: 205.327 Million (2005) (According to https://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/ [cia.gov]
  • by zappepcs (820751) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @08:15AM (#18939513) Journal
    when you are going to sanction the whole world (more or less).

    What is interesting to me is the fact that the whole world (more or less) thinks your products are so pricey that copyright infringement is a better option.

    And this little DRM thingy doesn't seem to be working out too well at the moment. Despite the **AAs opinion that DRM is the only way to protect their business product (which is distribution) the entire world (more or less) is telling them that their product is too expensive.

    I'd be willing to be that counts as the world talking with one voice? s
  • by djupedal (584558) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @08:17AM (#18939533)
    Let's be a bit more honest about this 'list', ok?

    If the US govt. says they 'just' put a dozen nations on a piracy blacklist, what it really means is that a dozen nations have been on said list for some time now, allowing the US govt. to harvest statistics, map patterns, etc.

    Saying this just went into effect is BS. I'd bet it's been a working list for at least the last year or three. The only reason a 'statement' is released is to keep two or more politically driven hot-button issues in sync in the public mind.
  • I attest my country (Score:5, Informative)

    by junglee_iitk (651040) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @08:31AM (#18939707)
    As an Indian I can attest that there is nothing going on in India to protect "Intellectual property". I am neglecting the facts that KPO [google.com] is a branded commodity for US, and the Bollywood industry has been doing its own part of playing RIAA in India.
    1) India is big, poor, and in short, 3rd world country. It has problems involving supply of water (clean or not), clean air etc. It surprises many people in India when they learn that other countries don't have regular power failures. I don't think there is absolutely anything anyone can do to stop piracy. If they could, they would stop theft of electricity first. And I am not even sure "Intellectual property" is widely accepted as property.
    2) Bollywood et. al. will never add the DRM. Dirt cheap electronics from China and Taiwan are driving the market, and anyone having a TV is buying a DVD player. And unlike most other countries, movies in Bollywood are made for the lowest section of society. No one can take the risk of screwing this market. Just some days ago I bought a DVD and was able to just copy-paste-play it. Region lock is not known to most people.

    Those are what I consider the good parts. The bad part is, though, that open source is a far off concept - a competition between free Windows and free Linux. I don't even remember a place where I can buy Windows legally. If you ask the dealer, he will just burn a CD for you, for free or for 15 rs. (.25 ). Unless Linux becomes as big as Windows, good luck having it a "Desktop OS".
    • Bollywood et. al. will never add the DRM.

      Actually, they already have added it to VCDs. For those of you who don't know what VCD is, just look it up in Wikipedia. Basically it's an old video format that's burnable to CDs and has lower quality video than DVD. Various video forums have questions posted from India asking why they can't copy the VCDs they just bought. It appears that many Indian companies have imposed DRM on VCDs. If they try to play a VCD on a PC, the VCD secretly loads a program on the
  • From TFA:

    "In addition to Russia and China, the 10 countries placed on the priority watch list were Argentina, Chile, Egypt, India,Israel, Lebanon, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine and Venezuela..."

    and then

    "The countries placed on a lower-level watch list were Belarus, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Hungary, Indonesia, Italy, Jamaica, South Korea, Kuwait, Lithuania, Malaysia, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan,

  • Piracy? (Score:2, Funny)

    by mebollocks (798866)
    Strange, here's a map of global piracy

    China and Russia don't seem to be a problem at all?

    http://www.icc-ccs.org/extra/display.php [icc-ccs.org]
  • by khyron664 (311649) on Tuesday May 01, 2007 @08:39AM (#18939831)

    I have to say I agree with this action to some degree. Namely as it relates to drug companies though. I've been involved people that work in the pharmaceutical business, and getting a drub approved by the FDA is NOT easy. Many never make it to market, and almost all of them require a lot of money to develop in R&D. While making a product is no guarantee of making money, they should be allowed some protection for doing the work. Without a patent on the drug, the minute it hits the market it will be reverse engineered by a different drug company and sold cheaper. Some say that is the way it should be, but I honestly don't agree. The company creating the drug is spending a lot of time and money in R&D, without which we wouldn't get the current drugs we have and rely on. Why should another company get to easily piggy back on their efforts? Where is the motivation to find new cures in that environment?

    As to the cost of the drugs, the companies are trying to make money. They're not non-profit organizations. Should they be? That's a different question all together which I won't address here. The rest of the world complains about the price of drugs and refuses to pay the prices the drug companies want to charge, instead deciding not to honor the patents on the drugs if the price doesn't come down. The result? The US has much higher drug prices than most of the rest of the world because we end up paying for the companies R&D costs since the rest of the world won't. Sorry, I can't feel bad about sanctions against countries that refuse to carry the burden of R&D costs and leave the US to carry it all. Do I feel the costs be lower? Definitely. However, I also don't know the R&D cost for a particular drug so whose to say the costs aren't in line with a reasonable time line to recoup R&D costs? I can't say I think having for profit companies develop the drugs helps things.

    Given this situation, what's the way to handle it OTHER than patents? How can a company recoup the R&D costs (plus a profit) for a drug at a price level that is fair to all countries? Why shouldn't the countries in the rest of the world be forced to honor the drug companies' patents? It's not like it's a field where the companies can simply say "Pay up or you don't get the cure".

    I don't really care much about the copyright portion of this story, but I get irked when I see people ranting against drug companies. They're definitely not perfect, but they are getting screwed by the rest of the world as bad as they screw the people in the US imo.

    Khyron
  • How to win friends and influence people.
  • Excellent. That will spur those countries on to innovate and work around the US protectionism. Eventually, we should see a slew of great new products.

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