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eDonkey Pays the Recording Industry $30M 270

Posted by kdawson
from the sound-of-falling-dominos dept.
ColinPL writes, "MetaMachine Inc., the firm behind online file-sharing software eDonkey, has agreed to pay $30 million to avoid potential copyright infringement lawsuits from the recording industry. The company also agreed to take measures to prevent file sharing by people using previously downloaded versions of the eDonkey software. The eDonkey application now displays the message, 'The eDonkey2000 Network is no longer available. Please see eDonkey.com for more details.' After that message is displayed the uninstaller is launched automatically." If you visit edonkey.com, it logs your IP address. How much will the demise of eDonkey matter, given that most who access that P2P network do so using the open-source eMule?
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eDonkey Pays the Recording Industry $30M

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  • by doti (966971) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:14PM (#16091374) Homepage
    The so called "recording industry" is just not needed anymore. Just get your fortune and invest in another productive area, and get over it.

    Go away. Please.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Uhhh, dumbass, somebody has to *make* that music before you can steal it. eDonkey didn't make that $30 million from people who wanted to hear Creative Commons .oggs of Cory Doctorow blowing his nose.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by kz45 (175825)
      "The so called "recording industry" is just not needed anymore. Just get your fortune and invest in another productive area, and get over it.

      Go away. Please."

      even if the current RIAA is gone, there will always be some type of recording industry around. It's just too lucrative.

      also, most artists have no experience marketing, selling, or dealing with the right people that will get them the high-paying gigs they need to continue performing and feed their family and or make the rent.
      • by arevos (659374) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @05:05PM (#16091875) Homepage
        also, most artists have no experience marketing, selling, or dealing with the right people that will get them the high-paying gigs they need to continue performing and feed their family and or make the rent.

        Yep, presumably artists will still need outside help to help them finance, organise and arrange large live gigs. However, I think there's less of a need for recording companies to market and distribute music from artists. Distributing music via the Internet is obviously cheap enough not to need financial backing; I need hardly go into the details of that on Slashdot. But marketing music is also a industry I expect to decline in the next few years. Music is an odd thing, in that one cannot 'sell' a piece of music in the same way one would sell a car. The customer either likes the piece of music he hears, or he does not. No amount of salesmanship will get him to change his mind, as it boils down to personal preference.

        Because of this, marketing music consists largely of getting people to listen to it. Unfortunately, people have limited time on their hands, and cannot listen to every piece of music, so recording companies market selectively, using bands they know have a wide appeal. It's a broad, scattergun approach, and I can't help but think that one could do a far better job with a large database and some social networking software.

        • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

          by Evil Shabazz (937088)
          It's a broad, scattergun approach, and I can't help but think that one could do a far better job with a large database and some social networking software.


          Are you suggesting GoogleMusic? :P
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by Kiaser Zohsay (20134)
            It's a broad, scattergun approach, and I can't help but think that one could do a far better job with a large database and some social networking software.

            Are you suggesting GoogleMusic? :P
            Or Pandora?
        • by yaphadam097 (670358) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @05:50PM (#16092261)
          Music is an odd thing, in that one cannot 'sell' a piece of music in the same way one would sell a car. The customer either likes the piece of music he hears, or he does not. No amount of salesmanship will get him to change his mind, as it boils down to personal preference.

          I disagree with this fundamentally. A lot of people, especially young people, buy music for reasons that have nothing to do with the quality of the actual music but have more to do with a certain image or subculture. I grew up listening to punk, and while some of it actually does qualify as good music, much of it is less about the content and more about expressing an opinion on the culture (Kind of like /. ;-) Rap/Hip-hop music too is often about an image - the clothes, the cars, the attitude, etc. - and not about the quality of the music. All of these things are expressed outside of the music as well. e.g. by the artists appearances, actions, and speech on radio/television, live concerts, etc. This "artistic image" is a kind of marketing and has always been exploited and/or manipulated by the recording industry. In this regard, there is quite a bit of salesmanship in the industry, and the artists are to a large degree dependent on the industry to get that image out via appearances in other media.

          • by talksinmaths (199235) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @08:33PM (#16093152) Homepage
            A lot of people, especially young people, buy music for reasons that have nothing to do with the quality of the actual music...

            You misspelled shallow. :)

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by Sj0 (472011)
              Video killed the radio star....and marketing killed the video star. Oops!
          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by Oddster (628633)
            Rap/Hip-hop music too is often about an image - the clothes, the cars, the attitude, etc. - and not about the quality of the music.

            I hope you know that the type of rap and hip-hop you talk about here is the kind which is foisted upon the airwaves by the recording industry, put on by the likes of 50 Cent, Chingy, etc. I used to dislike this genre myself for this reason.

            Then a friend turned me on to good hip-hop. Like Common, Hieroglyphics, and Mos Def to name a few, real hip-hip artists who you rarel
    • your sig (Score:3, Funny)

      by SnowZero (92219)
      I declare a subthread for people with prime user id numbers only.
      factor 92219: 92219
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by no_opinion (148098)
      You are right. Clearly the number of people still interested in getting a recording contract for large sums of money has diminished, as illustrated by the shrinking number of American Idol applicants and spin-off shows. /sacrcasm
    • by aplusjimages (939458) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:48PM (#16091693) Journal
      I don't know if they should go away, but for crying out loud adapt to the Internet. This is the new format. They all need to work together and remarket their products. They still expect people to buy their CD's by the billions as if CD's are still new technology. They still think they can put out 1-2 songs and then throw in 8 other songs to fill up a disc. The market is changing, so they need to change with it.
      • by shark72 (702619)

        "I don't know if they should go away, but for crying out loud adapt to the Internet. This is the new format. They all need to work together and remarket their products. They still expect people to buy their CD's by the billions as if CD's are still new technology. They still think they can put out 1-2 songs and then throw in 8 other songs to fill up a disc. The market is changing, so they need to change with it."

        Check out the iTunes Music Store sometime. Most of the major record labels are on board, an

    • by lymond01 (314120) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:51PM (#16091717)
      Their tactics could use some updating certainly, but there's a lot of money to be made in creating the next big star. Recorded music is still a commodity, and what drives the price up of concert tickets? A: Who is most famous. How do they get famous? A: Recording industry promotes them.

      What would happen without the recording industry? A: They'd become popular by internet vote and word-of-mouth, someone would claim to have "made them famous" on their website and demand some of their earnings from concerts, videos, commercials. Other people would hop on that bandwagon, realize it's easier to promote people if they work together, and they'd call it the WMIA, World Music Industry Association, claiming rights throughout the world as an "international" (ie internet-based) company.

      You'd think the way people talk that big industries are just a bunch of small people being greedy. Well, you'd be right.
    • There is absolutely nothing wrong with recording music for the purpose of sale, with the expectation that its copyright will be respected. It is moronic to think otherwise, as it implies that musicians in particular and content producers in general (including software developers) have some sort of obligation to give their work away. That is a ridiculous premise.

      The problem is not that music is easy to pirate and therefore copyright is meaningless and music should be free. Please stop insisting on that, it

  • Good thing (Score:4, Funny)

    by Vampyre_Dark (630787) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:15PM (#16091380)
    Good thing they paid up. Uncle RIAA thought it would be a shame if "something should happen to their nice office building".
    • Re:Good thing (Score:5, Interesting)

      by pla (258480) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:21PM (#16091443) Journal
      Good thing they paid up. Uncle RIAA thought it would be a shame if "something should happen to their nice office building".

      For some reason you got modded down, but really, I have to wonder about the legality of this...

      "eDonkey, has agreed to pay $30 million to avoid potential copyright infringement lawsuits from the recording industry". Not damages awarded by a court, not even to settle a pending suit - To avoid a potential lawsuit!

      If that doesn't meet the textbook definition of extortion, I don't know what would.
      • by miyako (632510)
        doesn't this sort of thing happen fairly often? Company A pays Company B X dollars to ensure that company B will not sue Company A for any sort of legal infringments? I think it happens mostly with patents.
        Not saying that it's right, just that it does seem to be the status quo.
      • Thank you for your researched and objective spin. Clearly many people on slashdot have not heard of a settlement.

        I got called into jury duty a few months ago and when I showed up I was assigned to a case. But they had all of the potential jurors just stand out in the hallway for what seemed like an hour. The whole time there was this nervous looking group of people down the hallway from us.

        Eventually the judge called just the jurors into his chamber and gave us a very friendly talk about how we had just
        • by Alchemar (720449)
          I think you missed the point. It would be one thing if it was a settlement, however there was nothing to settle. There was no lawsuit. If they had filed a lawsuit, and then reached an agreement it would be a settlement. This was more along the lines of pay us what we want or we will sue you. If you happen to think that the threat of getting sued is justice, you have not been in court with someone that outmatched you financially. It is more like poker than justice. If you can match the bet you can cal
          • You don't have to be able to match their bet to call their bluff. You just need to be willing to commit all of YOUR chips. If I raise you $100 and you only have $20 at the table, all I'm really raising you is $20.

            This is more like YOU were bluffing, and I just raised you big time, and you know that all you hold is a pair of deuces, so you fold to my bet. It's not that they can't afford to fight it--christ, they have at least $30,000,000--it's that they know that they don't have a case.
            • Actually, not true. Since the supreme court ruling, the p2ps have been settling. I don't think it is a mystery as to why - none of them actually have a leg to stand on when it comes to the inducement test. If they thought they could win, it would certainly be cheaper than $30 million to litigate.

      • It happens all the time. Big company with mean lawyer informs small company that if they dont' pay up we will litigte you to all hell. Even if we lose you will still be paying $30mil in lawyers fee and lost revinue so save yourself the trouble and pay us now. It's called legal blackmail.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by BGraves (790688)
        The vast majority of disputes are solved this way, which is a good thing. It reduces the costs created by taking a case to court, and frees up the courts to deal with other, more important disputes.
  • Morte d' Robertson (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Stanistani (808333) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:16PM (#16091390) Homepage Journal
    Slowly the vise closes in on all P2P... yet filesharing grows year by year...
    The media congloms win lots of battles while losing the war.
    • by X0563511 (793323) * on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:19PM (#16091423) Homepage Journal
      They call that a war of attrition. And they are indeed loosing (big lawsuits against few people wont work, they need small lawsuits against teeming crowds).

      But that's almost as impractical as SCO's lawsuit(s)
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by smilindog2000 (907665)
      I believe the powerful music and movie industries will succeed in forcing the US government to crack down on ISPs (not just individuals and web-sites). Then, eMule and it's network will go away, at least for us in the US. The ISPs will be happy to comply, since this will eliminate much of their traffic. It probably would have already happened had these industries not POed the GOP by donating generously to Democrats for years, and if the government weren't working so hard to be budy-budy with backbone car
      • by dthree (458263)
        One the bright side: legal digital music and video distribution should get cheaper. Those of us who actually pay for our stuff will see a benefit.

        I don't see how. Right now the industry has to compete on price with FREE. If they successfully eliminate that competition, why would they lower the prices?
      • One the bright side: legal digital music and video distribution should get cheaper. Those of us who actually pay for our stuff will see a benefit.

        I've got a bridge to sell you...

      • What should be done is have the ISPs (at least those in the Telephone industry, like Bellsouth, etc, that got our tax money to upgrade our infrastructure,) taken to court and sued for our tax dollars back. We can prove we gave them 200 billion dollars (I think?) to upgrade our entire nation's telecom infrastructure, with them promising better everything, including faster internet speeds. We should just gather all of the evidence we have, find a good lawyer, get a bunch of Slashdot users (most of them more t
    • You tell em Leia! The people of the galaxy are behind you!
  • time to cash out (Score:3, Interesting)

    by User 956 (568564) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:18PM (#16091404) Homepage
    MetaMachine Inc., the firm behind online file-sharing software eDonkey, has agreed to pay $30 million to avoid potential copyright infringement lawsuits from the recording industry.

    Sounds like they've made their fortune, and have made the decision to pay the piper and cash out. I have no doubt that MetaMachine's profits were far in excess of $30 million.
  • by xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:19PM (#16091420)
    If you visit edonkey.com, it logs your IP address
    If you visit one my my sites, I'll log your IP address too. So what - are they following up on each one to see if they are potential pirates?
    • Get this... (Score:5, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:21PM (#16091448)
      It also logs the page you requested, when you requested it, and your browser. Everyday, they also rotate their logs and compress them for further statistical tracking at a future point!
    • by mordors9 (665662)
      Have they been approaching it that way so far.... NO. They will simply send everyone a letter threatening to file suit if you don't send them a couple grand. Then it is up to you to prove you are innocent, and good luck doing it. Gee whiz, you seem to think that you should be innocent until proven guilty. What a wacky concept.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by vertical_98 (463483)
      If you visit edonkey.com, it logs your IP address

      I logged onto every one of our servers and lynx'ed to it. just so if someone is actually reading the logs can wonder why they get XX.XX.XX.130,131,132,133,....152.

      Vertical
  • by LiquidCoooled (634315) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:21PM (#16091440) Homepage Journal
    So, eDonkey wants to stay legit, good on them.
    They want to put in place controls to limit copying, good on them.
    They then give all their money to the bullys, bad move.
    Paying of the artists might seem like a prudent course of action, but once you pay of one group, what about the next?

    Theres the RIAA, MPAA and the BSA.
    The guitar tab people and the knitting pattern folks and all the other American groups.
    Thats not including all the individual software companies who want a piece of the pie, nor does it include all the groups from other countries (like FACT(Federation Against Copyright Theft) or CAAST(Canadian Alliance Against Software Theft)).

    What happens when I find software from my company is available on limewire, where do I get my piece of the pie from, or is mine not big enough and is simply enough to get it added to the list of banned searches without any financial payback?

    What makes my company different to the RIAA groups?

    Let the copyright owners prove blatant infringement, let them show the service is doing illegal things and let the service fix itself.

    Don't give into threats.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by sane? (179855)
      Paying of the artists might seem like a prudent course of action, but once you pay of one group, what about the next?
      I'd have less problem with them paying the artists directly, rather than the industry which includes all the other hangers on and parasites. I somehow doubt any of this money actually goes to the artists at all - it just inflates the profit lines of the various companies.
      • by rts008 (812749) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @07:44PM (#16092918) Journal
        I agree.
        It seems funny I was reading the Sept. 2006 edition of Reader's Digest this morning, and was drawn to an column "Turning Point" featuring Bob Newhart this month and he had something along those lines to say also.
        The article is titled "Finding My Funny Bone", by Bob Newhart.

        He was talking about two of his recordings : "The Button-Down Mind of Bob Newhart", and it's sequel, "The Button-Down Mid Strikes Back". The first went to #1 on the Billboard charts, and got between the two recordings, got him three Grammy's that year. He goes on to say that he just recently started getting royalties on the recordings (they came out in 1960), and:
        "Lately I have begun to receive royalties on the albums on a quarterly basis. Even as a trained accountant, I'm no exactly sure how they calculate these royalties without all of the financial records and contracts that burned up in The Great Warner's Office Fire of '73. But they apparently have a formula. Just last week, I received a check for $1.18."
    • by trevdak (797540)
      I view the RIAA and MPAA very differently.
      To make good music, you don't need a multi-million dollar budget or massive amounts of bling. The RIAA could disappear from the face of the planet and music would, if anything, improve as we are exposed to a more diverse selection.

      Movies, on the other hand, often need a high budget. You can't make the Matrix or LotR or Star Wars or 90% of the other movies that slashdotters love without HUGE budgets. The MPAA needs movie tickets and DVD sales to survive. Granted, the
    • by OzPhIsH (560038)
      With the way you formatted your post, I couldn't help but read it as if they were song lyrics. I think I'll go upload this post on a p2p network now... Arrrrrgh
  • by ranjix (892606) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:24PM (#16091468)
    historically speaking, eMule comes from eDonkey (eStallion) and eHorse (eMare)... Plus is sterile, RIAA likes that
  • by Penguinisto (415985)

    Instead of threats of violence or interference, there's threats of lawsuits to extract cash and force the death of anything that threatens a well-financed-enough organization. Yay. (as /me shakes head)...

    It's almost as if the RIAA can now go after any company who sells products with any sort of file-transfer technology... I wonder why they haven't gone after any web browser that supports FTP, or anyone who makes/distributes an NNTP reader? Hell, FTP and NNTP were passing copyrighted files around long bef

  • I wonder... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by GmAz (916505) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:25PM (#16091488) Journal
    So, does the $30 million go to the 'starving' artists or will the RIAA soak up the money?
    • by really? (199452)
      Of course it will go to the starving artists. The starving RIAA scam artists, that is.
  • by dcavanaugh (248349) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:28PM (#16091516) Homepage
    Where did eDonkey GET $30M to pay RIAA? Or is this a hyped-up announcement of a "settlement" that is never really collected?
    • by AbRASiON (589899) *
      This is exactly what I was thinking.

      Has another company gone broke because the RIAA are a bunch of assholes?
    • by shark72 (702619) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @06:05PM (#16092366)

      "Where did eDonkey GET $30M to pay RIAA? Or is this a hyped-up announcement of a "settlement" that is never really collected?"

      From advertising.

      Many people mistakenly see the big players in the P2P game as "white knights" because they make it so easy to get so much music for free. But, make no mistake: they are not in it because "information wants to be free." They are not in it to "stick it to the man." They do it to make money. They are in the business of helping people pirate music, and business is goooood.

      It's funny that many of us justify our P2P usage by imagining some record executive in a $3,000 suit. The reality is usually different. The only record company owner I've met ran a ten-person label and paid himself $25K a year. Sam and Jed, the folks who brought you eDonkey so countless teens can "stick it to the man," likely made about $25K every week. The executives at Sharman are also multi-millionaires.

      So why are Sam and Jed rich, while my friend the indie record label owner could only afford to pay himself $25K a year? Because my friend paid artists, paid employees, and paid for the production of the music.

  • Logged IP? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by im_mac (927998) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:28PM (#16091520)
    Everyone who clicks on the eDonkey link gets this friendly message:


    "You are not anonymous when you illegally download copyrighted material. Your IP address is xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx and has been logged."

    Great, I only go to the site, they chastise me for 'stealing' music and then write down my IP address. How long until the RIAA sends me a letter regarding my visit to eDonkey.com and requests to view my harddrive to find 'stolen' files?

    • it will almost certainly never happen, you have been used and abused probably intentionally to provide a list of visitor ip addresses with no intention of downloading the edonkey client. why else would slashdot and the original story both link to the edonkey site.

      visiting the site after reading the news story is normal legal behaviour, not evidence that you have shared anything or grounds to investigate further.

      of course if your running ubuntu you wouldnt have any reason to visit the site even if you did wa
  • by urbanradar (1001140) <timothyfielding AT gmail DOT com> on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:28PM (#16091523) Homepage
    And let's not forget... for Linux, there's the ever-excellent aMule [amule.org] client to access the network.
  • by Nom du Keyboard (633989) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:48PM (#16091692)
    Where does all this money come from? Weren't they distributing a free program to allow the free swapping of digital files? Where does the $30M show up from?
    • by antic (29198)
      That's my question too. $30m! Even if there was a paid, pro version, who actually buys those to download files?!
    • by soft_guy (534437)
      Where does all this money come from?

      The investors in eDonkey?
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by shark72 (702619)

      "Where does all this money come from? Weren't they distributing a free program to allow the free swapping of digital files? Where does the $30M show up from?"

      Giving something away for free, which helps people get free music, does not necessarily mean that you are a philanthropist. Sam and Jed were very much in it for the money. And they did very well. They are millionaires. So are the principals of Sharman Networks, the folks behind Kazaa.

      It's ironic, because many people justify their piracy becau

    • advertisement
  • FUD! (Score:5, Funny)

    by robpoe (578975) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:51PM (#16091723)
    Plain old FUD .. EVERY friggin website in the world logs your IP address. It's only that, an IP address.

    I went there JUST so they would log my IP address. There! Sue me RIAA. I visited a public website. Boo friggin hoo..

    Next they'll be sending secret police to my house to @(*$fiu$#(NO CARRIER)

  • cool! (Score:5, Funny)

    by Supersonic1425 (903823) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @04:53PM (#16091746)
    now when I want to know my IP address, I can get a free threatening message with it! awesome.
  • That's like paying Satan to get off your back. It will only make the problem worse. If I was one of the people who ran eDonkey I would have left the country a long time ago to escape the Recording Industry Mafia known as the RIAA.
  • by pjbass (144318) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @05:02PM (#16091837) Homepage
    When the recording industry forced the Gnapster community offline, they all patted themselves on the back for a job well done. But the opennap network was just spinning up, and was bigger and better than the original. Fast forward a few years ahead, and all these attacks on PnP filesharing has generated beautiful, useful protocols like BitTorrent.

    Let them keep attacking, because we will always have someone out there out-innovating the money-hungry RIAA and MPAA.
    • by satoshi1 (794000)
      You can't out-innovate something that doesn't innovate. Or can you always out-innovate something that doesn't innovate.. I always get the two confused.
  • The tighter you squeeze the more slips out between your fingers.
  • by grazzy (56382)
    They got my IP!
  • Is visiting the edonkey site enough to constitute intent to infringe and bring the wrath of the man down on you?
  • Heh I had no idea... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Fnkmaster (89084) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @05:38PM (#16092161)
    My guess is that they agreed to a settlement that the RIAA knew the company didn't have the funds to pay. This will force them into a Chapter 7 liquidation under which the RIAA recoups a fraction of the 30 mil, and lines up with other creditors based on their priority in the capital structure of the firm.

    The goal of this is probably to prevent the equity shareholders from getting any return on their dime.

    I doubt that eDonkey had greater than 30 mil in cash on hand, and I doubt they even had that in total assets. This is based on my knowledge of the workings of other similar P2P developers and of small tech firms in general.

    If I am wrong and they have sold hundreds of millions of dollars in advertising and were sitting on a huge nest egg, I'd be very surprised.
  • I haven't turned on my aMule client in months. Downloading now...
  • How much will the demise of eDonkey matter, given that most who access that P2P network do so using the open-source eMule?


    Just a teeny little bit? :-)
  • This is the single most stupid message that I have ever seen. Thease idiots did the right thing, they did die in the hands of a bully.

    ------
    The eDonkey2000 Network is no longer available.

    If you steal music or movies, you are breaking the law.

    Courts around the world -- including the United States Supreme Court --
    have ruled that businesses and individuals can be prosecuted for illegal
    downloading.

    You are not anonymous when you illegally download copyrighted material.

    Your IP address is -removed- and has been lo
  • Really, I never used eDonkey, but I've used eMule quite a bit. It seemed to me that they would have had a strong case against the RIAA. Yes, they would have to worry about the issue of providing tools for pirating, and in the current legal environment, that's pretty dangerous, but the case history has been that if you can show substantial non-infringing uses, then it's not illegal, and let's face it, you can find very substantial examples of non-infringing content on the eDonkey network. That just seems lik
  • Future activities of your new overlords will include, but wont be limited to :

    - Extorthion

    - Bridge trolling and tolling

    - Forcing every household's firstborn male into service

    - Claiming each and every newlywed bride for the first night
  • Lets give the RIAA a few million IP addresses to pay people to sift through!
  • by Simonetta (207550) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @07:59PM (#16093000)
    They agreed to pay what $30 million dollars???? I cry horseshit! Nobody who actually has $30 million dollars has ever, does ever, or will ever just agree to give it away to someone. Especially something as legally dubious as an RIAA lawsuit.

        Most likely they agreed to 'pay' some absurd amount of money knowing full well that barely more than a few thousand dollars would ever be passed to the RIAA under any circumstances. They agree to some sum that they would never have (after all they aren't any different from you and me, gentle Slashdaughters) if there was any posssiblity that they would actually have to come up with the cash. I would guess that 'E-Donkey incorporated' owes $3,000,000,000,000,000 dollars for their 'crime', and the people and programmers who actually were eating all the pizza at E-Donkey's parties don't have to pay anything. As long as they agree to 'be good in the future'.

        If the actual people had to pay even 1/1000th of the this absurd amount for their 'crime', then I'll bet that they would be planning serious mayhem on the RIAA lawyers that were personally involved with this bullshit lawsuit.

        Look, I'm against violence and horror as much as the next girl, but, in the real world, when you're up against real assholes like the RIAA, then violence and horror goes a long way to 'equalizing' the legal chessboard. Sooner or later the RIAA is going to figure this out. Probably each lawyer will, individually, as they watch their guts drip out onto the floor of their BMW just after winning another extortion lawsuit for downloading 'Yummy, Yummy, Yummy' against that one wrong person.

        Keep your fingers crossed.

"Trust me. I know what I'm doing." -- Sledge Hammer

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