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The Internet Censorship

MySpace Users Revolt Against Murdoch 393

Posted by Hemos
from the the-joy-of-running-user-communities dept.
arclightfire writes "Looks like Murdoch's News International have stired up a revolt within users of the MySpace file-sharing site they purchased for $629m (£355m) last July, reports the Independent; "Angry members of MySpace, the personal file-sharing website for young adults, are accusing Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation of censoring their postings and blocking their access to rival sites. The 38 million subscribers to MySpace...discovered that when they wrote to each other about rival video-swapping site YouTube, the words were automatically deleted, and attempts to download video images from YouTube led to blank screens. The intervention by News Corp in the traditionally open-access world of the web - in particular the alteration of personal user profiles - provoked a storm of angry posts...The protests gathered pace, and when 600 MySpace customers complained and a campaign began to boycott the site and relocate to rival sites such as Friendster, Linkedin, revver.com and Facebook.com, News Corp relented and restored the links.""
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MySpace Users Revolt Against Murdoch

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  • Er... (Score:5, Informative)

    by tolan-b (230077) on Monday January 09, 2006 @09:03AM (#14426517)
    MySpace isn't a file-sharing website is it?
  • Just a quick note (Score:2, Informative)

    by Kanpai (713697) <[moc.liamg] [ta] [iaWiapnaK]> on Monday January 09, 2006 @09:07AM (#14426556)
    Rupert Murdoch's company is actually called News Corperation, not News International.
  • Re:Just a quick note (Score:2, Informative)

    by Flaming Babies (904475) on Monday January 09, 2006 @09:10AM (#14426575)
    News International is the main UK subsidiary of News Corporation.
  • News International? (Score:4, Informative)

    by nwbvt (768631) on Monday January 09, 2006 @09:15AM (#14426598)
    The British newspaper? How does it control MySpace? Surely you mean News Corp, the name of the parent company.
  • Re:Er... (Score:2, Informative)

    by batteryman (245402) on Monday January 09, 2006 @09:30AM (#14426693) Homepage
    It was used at one time for filesharing. It was more like Live365, but you could capture the streams to a file. You could also create your own streams from other peoples collections of music.
  • Re:Er... (Score:4, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday January 09, 2006 @09:33AM (#14426708)
    It's not a file-sharing site, per se. However, it does have a large community of bands and musicians, and allows them to stream their music via builtin players and whatnot. I can (almost) see how a clueless journalist could confuse that with "file-sharing".
  • by Shimbo (100005) on Monday January 09, 2006 @09:39AM (#14426738)
    The British newspaper? How does it control MySpace? Surely you mean News Corp, the name of the parent company.

    News International is the name of the main UK subsidiary of News Corp. Easy mistake for a Brit to make - I'd never heard of News Corp either.
  • by typical (886006) on Monday January 09, 2006 @10:16AM (#14427001) Journal
    Free is fine, as long as you never lock yourself in to the service.

    Google and Yahoo's search are fine, because other than a bit of familiarity with their interfaces, they have no lock-in on me. They can't hurt me much other than sticking ads around (and eventually, if the search pages gets unusable, I have to switch.) But every time you use a "free" service provided by a company, you gotta ask yourself ("how exactly could this company hurt me?") Ultimately, they're a business out to make money, and unless you've got a really good answer in which your interests and their own are permanently conjoined, you might want to think again.

    Free email providers (c'mon, neither email nor domains are that expensive -- I use mailsnare for $20 a *year*, and domains are something like $10 a year and you can do other stuff with 'em) are going to want to make money off of the lock-in that they've established, and that means doing something that you don't like sooner or later. Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but someday. Maybe after they get bought or their management changes or they sell their email wing to someone else, or they hit hard times...who knows.
  • Re:Er... (Score:1, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday January 09, 2006 @10:31AM (#14427108)
    From TFA:
    Looks like Murdoch's News International have stired up a revolt within users of the MySpace file-sharing site they purchased for $629m (£355m) last July,

    Now who's obtuse?
  • by andytuna (860940) on Monday January 09, 2006 @10:43AM (#14427184)
    And News International owns The Times and The Sun amongst other titles, News international isn't a paper itself.
  • by kid-noodle (669957) <jono.nanosheep@net> on Monday January 09, 2006 @01:20PM (#14428550) Homepage
    Here's the skinny - MySpace.com was originally a filesharing site, however that went defunct in 1999.
    The MySpace we know today appears to have always been owned by the same people - IntermixMedia (IntermixMedia.com), who were initially called eUniverse and are to all intents and purposes a (viral) marketing company. eUniverse changed their name following accounting troubles which resulted in them being delisted from the Nasdaq [intermix.com], and allegations regarding spyware.
    IntermixMedia was subsequently bought [intermix.com] by News Corp. for an apparant $580m.

    Exactly where the two (three [businessweek.com], including Brad Greenspan who left around the time of the troubles with the SEC) guys who apparantly started MySpace come into it all, is at best unclear.
  • Re:Shut it down (Score:3, Informative)

    by Lord_Dweomer (648696) on Monday January 09, 2006 @04:08PM (#14430100) Homepage
    First, I have to say there are serious trust issues if you have to hack your son's account. If he EVER finds out (and I hope he does) that you did so, not only will he lose all trust in you, but he will just be more careful about people finding out the next time he buys drugs.

    Which leads me to my next point. You demonize MySpace, which is simply a communication tool. If he doesn't get his hookup on MySpace, he'll get it through AIM, Friendster, cellphone, etc. So you are correct, it is not the website that it is the problem.

    Now my final point is one you're going to hate...but you need to realize that different people have different views on pot, and while he is just a kid and should probably not be using it, what he should be doing is forming his own opinion on things.

    Rather than just ineffectively try to stop him from doing the drugs (which, short of tossing him into solitary you don't be able to do), try educating him. And not just that "this is why pot is bad for you" garbage. Why not expose him to both sides of the coin, the studies that point in both directions (it is hardly unanimous that pot is bad) and let him eventually make his own decision on whether it is bad for you or not. Now, thats not to say he's allowed to use it or not. You are his parents, and he lives by your rules. But the kid should certainly be allowed to form his own opinion even if it differs from yours.

  • by Billly Gates (198444) on Monday January 09, 2006 @04:26PM (#14430262) Journal
    For those who live in the states you know what kind of biased garbage they produce. Murdock is an ultraconservative and Foxnews is owned by one of bush's cousins.

    I personally credit Murdock and Fox news for putting Bush into office twice due to the brainwashing. Whats scary is more viewers watch Fox then CNN and MSNBC combined and I could not believe the misinformation that is spewed out. Fox heavily went after Clinton as the most corrupt leader in American history but called Delay's indicement criminalizing politics.

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