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Why One Man Got a Guerrilla RFID Implant 348

Posted by timothy
from the better-than-letting-someone-else-choose-it dept.
Shannon writes "One of my writers just did an interview with Amal Graafstra, who just had an RFID implant put in his hand and has been building appliances for it to simplify and automate his life... "I guess I have my own Big Brother paranoia. Given the choice of Orwellian societies, I'd rather live in one based on RFID tags than fingerprints, DNA, or facial structure; an RFID tag system is easy to manage and opt out of, whereas DNA sampling or facial recognition, well, isn't.""
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Why One Man Got a Guerrilla RFID Implant

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  • Opt-out, eh? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by The_REAL_DZA (731082) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:26PM (#12091694)
    So I guess this guy just doesn't take his hand with him if he doesn't want to be tracked?
    • Re:Opt-out, eh? (Score:3, Insightful)

      by nocomment (239368)
      I was wondering if he ever read revelations.
      • Re:Opt-out, eh? (Score:2, Interesting)

        My thoughts exactly. The idea as a whole seems pretty cool, though. Reminds me of Mercedes' (or was it made by Lexus first? some car company's:...) key system where if you throw the keys in the trunk, the trunk won't close or lock or anything. Once you get within a few feet of the car it will unlock automatically and even start up if you have it set to. I'd rather be able to leave they keys at home, then have them surgically implanted into my hand (or left butt cheek... wherever).
      • From his site (Score:3, Informative)

        by JLavezzo (161308)
        From his site:
        _______
        Q: what about the mark of the beast!?
        A: well, last time I checked, this chip wasn't required, I won't be killed for not having one, I don't need it to buy/sell things, and with billions of unique ID codes (numbers and letters), I don't see how each unique code could be calculated in some way to 666. bottom line, if this ever becomes an oppressive technology, required by some government, I can simply take it out.

        - Revelation 13:16 - And he causeth all, both small and great, rich a
        • by SoTuA (683507) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:56PM (#12092178)
          <nit pic>

          <nit pick>it's nit pick, not pic.</nit pick>

        • Let's remember that the hebrew letters for "Nero Caesar" (NRWN QSR) sum 50+200+6+50+100+60+200=666.

          Some interpretations say that the Latin name "Neron Caesar" also sums 666.

          So please, ask a Bible scholar before jumping up to conclusions.

          It's funny, you know... how people let tend to believe rumours and conspiracy theories, when they should be working on helping the poor and feeding the hungry (Hellooooo, Matthew 25 anyone?)
          • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @04:45PM (#12092913)
            Emperor Domitian was a contemporary of St. John the Beloved. Domitian caused a massive statue of himself to be built at Ephesus, overlooking the marketplace. Anyone who wanted to get into the marketplace had to purchase and burn incense in worship to him. Once you had paid for the incense they used a warm blob of wax or a bit of pigment, making a mark on your wrist or forehead to prove you had paid. To worship the Emperor and to swear loyalty to your country were one and the same, considered inseperable. To say "I support our troops but not the Emperor" was sedition. When Christians refused to buy incense, they were asked "Why do you hate your country? Do you wish the Emperor dead?"

            Domitian also had a Greek chorus of 24 singers robed in white that followed him around. Ceaselessly they cried [bible.cc] "Holy, holy, holy is our lord and our god Domitian who was and who is and who is to come", falling down and worshipping him. For more information about Domitian, find a book by Plutarch in your local library.
        • Re:From his site (Score:3, Informative)

          The actual name (in appropriate Greek script) is "he Apokalypsis tou Agiou Ioannou Theologou". What it's actually calledby people is another matter entirely.
        • You're reading it from a translation. Which is actually beside the point.

          The people who are concerned about this believe that a tatooed or implanted personal I.D. number, used to identify a person for financial transactions, to be a close enough fit to the verse to satisfy the prophecy. (In that case, the "666" just becomes the number of the beast/man behind the scheme.)
        • Re:From his site (Score:5, Interesting)

          by Rei (128717) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @04:59PM (#12093106) Homepage
          Most people completely misinterpret that '666' number. First off, it's not just a number: it is a number *and* a name. The Greeks wrote numbers using letters, each letter standing for a number. Unlike our system where we use only 10 digits and use ordering to denote the significance of the digits, the Greek system had a different 10 digits for each power of 10. Since they ran out of letters fairly quickly, they brought in older letters that had gone into disuse.

          What Revelations actually says is that the number and name of the beast is "xi-chi-digamma" (digamma is also known as "stigma"). This is pronounced ks-kh-w (ks as in the x in "fox", kh as in the ch in "loch"). The xi is 600, the chi is 60, and the digamma is 6. This is *not* three sixes, like many people try and reduce it to; it is a six hundred, a sixty, and a six, combined to make the number six hundred sixty six. If you were to write three sixes in ancient Greek, they would be three sixes, not six hundred sixty six.
      • Re:Opt-out, eh? (Score:3, Interesting)

        by fm6 (162816)
        End time fanatics love to claim the number of the beast [blueletterbible.org] as a prophecy of some future Orwellian state. But in fact it was probably just a numerological reference to Nero. You add up the numerical value of the Greek letters for "Neron Kaiser" ("Emperor Nero") and you get 616. But isn't the number 666? In most current Bibles. But the people who put the Bible together had their choice of manuscripts -- and they rejected the ones that say 616.

        Referring to the current emperor as a number sounds strange. But i

      • Re:Opt-out, eh? (Score:2, Insightful)

        by JudgeFurious (455868)
        I'm sure he did. He just recognized it for the "Fiction" that it is.
    • Screw the tin foil hats, how about a tin foil glove? IIRC, can't RFIDs on products be somehow deactived when you leave the store? IF there was a way to turn it off and on, this wouldn't be so bad, but I wouldn't want something that has info on my all the time, even if it is encyrpted.
    • Thats the craziest thing I've ever heard. Op-out? Sure if you have your surgery unit on stand-by. Wait till the start implanting it in your skull or trunk for "security reasons". Lets see your Op-Out then. Thank You, but I'll hold out for the Orwellian society of none.
  • Tattoo (Score:5, Funny)

    by markmcb (855750) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:26PM (#12091704) Homepage
    I knew I shouldn't have gotten that bar code tattoo... Idiot!
    • I *almost* got a bar code tattoo, but I opted for binary [no-ip.com] instead :)

      Out of all my tattoos, I get asked about it the most.
      (It's the ascii for my daughter's name)

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:27PM (#12091716)
    So he has traded something unique and personal for something that can be read at a distance, copied and used freely by others. What is the advantage exactly?
    • While you are correct in noting that he has traded something unique and personal for something that can be faked and read at a distance, unlike DNA, RFID tags can be removed--all it takes is something sharp (and a tolerance for pain, if RFID an implant). That's the advantage. You can escape and RFID chip, but you can never escape your own DNA.

      Well, until we perfect retrovirus-style mutagenic gene therapy, but that's a topic for another time. d^_^b

    • by GreyPoopon (411036) <gpoopon@[ ]il.com ['gma' in gap]> on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:42PM (#12091960)
      So he has traded something unique and personal for something that can be read at a distance, copied and used freely by others.

      "At a distance" in this case is less than two inches, although I'm sure somebody will use a Pringles can to make a reader that works at up to 1 km.

      • I can read rfid access badges from 4 feet away.
        takes a tiony bit of electronics to do so. but generating that large of a power field sucks up juice. I can certianly read it from 12 inches which is easily obtainable while walking past in the hallway.
  • by Timesprout (579035) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:27PM (#12091717)
    the store detectives in walmart keep stopping him because they think he registers as a case of beer.
  • Yeah right (Score:5, Insightful)

    by metlin (258108) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:27PM (#12091722) Journal
    an RFID tag system is easy to manage and opt out of

    Hahaha! So you think - until it becomes absolutely mandatory and illegal for you to remove them.

    Or -- imagine -- systems which would just not function without an RFID implant, or harm you if you do not have one.

    What would you do then?

    Get over it, you're slowly losing all the privacy you once had. It's one of the prices we are paying for certain advancements (and obvious advantages).

    Whether or not you choose to have them - that would be your choice, at the moment. However, you really may not have the ability to make that choice a while from now.
    • Re:Yeah right (Score:4, Insightful)

      by slavemowgli (585321) * on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:32PM (#12091801) Homepage
      It actually doesn't even have to be mandatory to be practically impossible to opt out of. Just try doing things like flying or booking a hotel room or similar things without photo ID today - it's hardly possible.
      • You need Valid Current Photo ID to open a bank account, RIDE THE GREYHOUND, fly, get into bars, etc, etc. The banks USED to accept bills or a social security card (or both) as proof of ID; Greyhound was even easier to deal with.

        I let my license expire in '99 and had to get a fresh state ID in mid 2k4- not having Valid ID had become such massive inconvenience that it was more hassle to not have one than it was to just Get It Over With.
    • Hahaha! So you think - until it becomes absolutely mandatory and illegal for you to remove them.

      Well, there's always tin-foil gloves. A bit like the shiny pointy hat you have on your head, ya know...
    • So you think - until it becomes absolutely mandatory and illegal for you to remove them.

      If it ever becomes extremely necessary for me to remove an RFID implant, well, I own a pocketknife, and I'll be motivated to use it.

      Chip H.
  • by PxM (855264) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:27PM (#12091723)
    Instead of going with a permanent implant, why not just get a stylish gold ring or watch or other thing with an RFID chip? I never take off my watch so it would give me almost the same functionality. Or maybe a false fingernail or something that is semipermament. This allows me to opt out without having to cut myself open.

    --
    Want a free Nintendo DS, GC, PS2, Xbox. [freegamingsystems.com] (you only need 4 referrals)
    Wired article as proof [wired.com]
  • by Patik (584959) <cpatik@NOSpaM.gmail.com> on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:27PM (#12091728) Homepage Journal
    If it's easy to opt out of a system of identification, then no one who is serious will use that system. If your gov't wants to track your movements (or whatever you think you're up against) they're not going to use easily-circumvented RFIDs, they'll use biometrics.
    • by ari_j (90255)
      When I think "electronic implant" and "opt-out," I think Tripods. Remember the part where they have to cut an implant out of the kid's armpit without any anaesthetic?
  • Until... (Score:3, Funny)

    by varmittang (849469) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:29PM (#12091752)
    Until someone catches your RFID tag info, and steals your identity.....again.
  • Ideal... (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Tribbin (565963)
    Ideal for people that rather have their hand cut off and being stolen instead of only being stolen.
  • FAQ (Score:5, Informative)

    by th1ckasabr1ck (752151) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:30PM (#12091760)
    FAQ from his website [amal.net]

    Q: can't they track you?!
    A: no. the read range is only 2 inches max. even with a high powered reader, the chip itself does not have the capability to transmit farther than a couple inches tops. this makes it very difficult to scan my RFID chip without me noticing, and it's definitely not possible to scan it just by me walking by a sensor or something. It has to be pretty deliberate.

    Q: what about GPS?!
    A: no. there is currently no implantable GPS technology. none. there are very oversized watches you can wear that do support GPS tracking, but they look like a dick tracy watch on steroids.

    Q: is all your information on there?!
    A: no. as stated above, there is only an 8 character unique code.. like 48e9s18f for example. the chip is read-only (you can't change the data on it) and what it does or what that string of characters means depends on what system is scanning it. the system I'm creating will use that string to ID me and let me in my house, my car, or log me into my computer. if you have your cats or dogs tagged with a chip, they too only carry a unique code, and the animal's information is stored in a central database. hospitals are looking to use this technology in the arms of people to link a person's ID with their medical records in the computer system. The medical data won't, at this time, be stored on the chip itself as many fear.

    Q: are you crazy?!
    A: sure, why not.

    Q: what about the mark of the beast!?
    A: well, last time I checked, this chip wasn't required, I won't be killed for not having one, I don't need it to buy/sell things, and with billions of unique ID codes (numbers and letters), I don't see how each unique code could be calculated in some way to 666. bottom line, if this ever becomes an oppressive technology, required by some government, I can simply take it out.

    - Revelation 13:16 - And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads.
    - Revelation 13:17 - And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.
    - Revelation 13:18 - Here is wisdom. Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six. (666)

    Q: how big is the implant?
    A: it's 12mm long by 2mm in diameter.

    Q: why the hand, and your left hand to boot?
    A: well, I reach for my car door handle with my left hand, and I can get used to opening my front door with my left as well. plus, being right handed, my left hand is far less likely to get crushed, mutilated, or otherwise damaged... and I'm sure granules of crushed glass, silicon, and other metals could cause health complications, aside from having a crushed hand.

    Q: did you do it yourself?
    A: hell no. a client of mine is a doctor and we traded services.

    Q: is this a hoax?
    A: come on, I have better things to do than make things up. Here's a quick video I took with my crappy pentax digital camera, showing basic operation. A friend converted it to a much smaller standard QuickTime file for me. Here's a large, high res picture of the implant site as of 03-24-2005 4:00pm PST.

    Q: I have questions, how can I contact you?
    A: you have to pass a test first. don't worry, it's easy. take the domain name of this website, remove the top level domain, replace the period with an @ sign, then type the name of the greek god of dreams, followed by the letters "inc", and then place a period and the letters "com". if you can figure that out, you pass the test.

    • I think with a supercooled quantum detector and highly directional antennae the effective scanning range could be quite a bit more than two inches
      • Re:FAQ (Score:2, Insightful)

        by qwijibo (101731)
        I think someone with a knowledge of radio equipment, antennas, and motive to spend the money on those things would be able to extend the range. Even a range of 5-10 feet would be adequate for an attacker. Taking several attempts at reading the chip would make it pretty easy to reconstruct the number.
        • Re:FAQ (Score:4, Informative)

          by khrtt (701691) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @04:21PM (#12092569)
          You need to transmit enough power to the chip to bring up its transmitter. Low-frequency tags use a 125kHz magnetic field for that. The field is transmitted by a coil antenna in the reader. The transmitter replies by modulating the field, i.e. by connecting a resistor across its little antenna coil. This modulation is very feeble.

          Since a reasonably sized 125 kHz magnetic antenna could hardly be made directional, for long range scanning you'd need to create a strong and large field with a large high-power coil, but then you couldn't detect the modulation reliably. A small low-power reader coil in direct proximity of the chip has a much better S/N ratio, but it has to be close to the chip to work.

          In other words, it would be very difficult to create a long-range reader, for technical reasons.
          • suppose the target was somewhere midway between a coil antenna and a detector? or maybe even a common mode rejection amp fed by multiple receivers placed on an arc a fixed distance from the coil?
    • Re:FAQ (Score:3, Insightful)

      by markana (152984)
      >Q: can't they track you?!
      >A: no. the read range is only 2 inches max. even

      *Your* read range is 2 inches - I'll bet a bit of tweaked hardware can extend it to multiple feet. If I pass near you with a reader in my coat pocket, I'll get your tag #. Then I can spoof it, and enjoy the same physical access you do.

      >with a high powered reader, the chip itself does
      >not have the capability to transmit farther than
      >a couple inches tops. this makes it very
      >difficult to scan my RFID chip without m
    • by solios (53048)
      Revelation 13:17 - And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.

      Well, we're still working on the implants; but credit cards, debit cards, the whole PIN interface-to-money thing definitely covers the rest.

      Of course, we're still in the "BUT IT MAKES MY LIFE EASIER!!!" stage. It'll be quite awhile before we're a completely cashless society.... at which point implants will start to seem like a good idea.

      (RFID locks would be INCREDIBLY han
  • by Eric(b0mb)Dennis (629047) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:30PM (#12091761)
    Hahaha when RFID implants are a normal occurance, I, for one, can't wait for the RFID Sniper Rifle

    Deliver a SHOCKING suprise up to 500 feet away! Fun for the whole family
    • by Animats (122034)
      Ah, yes, the RFID sniper rifle. [backfire.dk]
      • The ID SNIPER rifle designed by EMPIRE NORTH

        What is the ID SNIPER rifle?

        It is used to implant a GPS-microchip in the body of a human being, using a high powered sniper rifle as the long distance injector. The microchip will enter the body and stay there, causing no internal damage, and only a very small amount of physical pain to the target. It will feel like a mosquito-bite lasting a fraction of a second. At the same time a digital camcorder with a zoom-lense fitted

  • Unnecessary surgery (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Monkelectric (546685) <<slashdot> <at> <monkelectric.com>> on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:30PM (#12091776)
    My first thought (as a diabetic) is, what a wonderful opportunity to die of an infection :)
    • This morning I woke up refreshed, opened the window to a beautiful day, took in some fresh air, and thought what a great opportunity today was to die of an infection.

      It's good to see another like-minded optimist.
  • by jokestress (837997) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:33PM (#12091815)
    I hate that guys are getting implants. Sure, they look good, but they feel hard as rocks!
  • by ErikTheRed (162431) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:33PM (#12091827) Homepage
    Hopefully he's not using one of those 40-bit Texas Instruments RFID modules that was cracked recently [slashdot.org]. Nothing like having some 5cr1pt k1dd13z pwn1ng your entire self...
  • by StefanJ (88986) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:38PM (#12091888) Homepage Journal
    Yeah, all this nonsense about freedom and autonomy and choice and privacy is whack.

    May as well metaphorically roll over on your back and piss on yourself in the face of Big Brother now and get to feel all cool about being an early adopter.

    I know, let's ditch human dignity altogether and get a big ol' cattle tag clamped on our ears! Let people know whose herd you belong to!

    Stefan
  • I've always thought (Score:4, Interesting)

    by kpwoodr (306527) <kenneth DOT p DO ... AT gmail DOT com> on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:39PM (#12091904) Homepage Journal
    Instead of SSN's (here in the States, as most of Americans, I'm ingorant of the rest of the world) I've always thought we should all be assigned a GUID at birth. If you can't remember it, well, you're screwed. Mine just happens to be:

    {EDB6154D-43E6-4707-B453-5FAB334B968E}

    With it being globally unique (theoretically), it would be nearly impossible to memorize anyone's other than yourself (I struggle to remember my wife's SSN). So when the identity thief goes to the dealership to buy a car with your id, when they can't recite the GUID assigned to you, they are instantly arrested and displayed hanging from their toenails in the town square for all to see.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @04:09PM (#12092366)
      So when the identity thief goes to the dealership to buy a car with your id, when they can't recite the GUID assigned to you, they are instantly arrested and displayed hanging from their toenails in the town square for all to see.

      Have you ever mistyped your password? Would you like to be arrested if you did?

      What if the buyer is sick the day he goes to make payment on your car? What he's hungover? What if he's getting old, and his memories are fading? What if she's got dislexia, and can't visualize numbers, let alone memorize them?

      With it being globally unique (theoretically), it would be nearly impossible to memorize anyone's other than yourself

      You define "nearly impossible" differently than I do. :-)

      If you ask most people if they can memorize ten digit numbers, they say "no". If you ask them their best friends phone number, they rattle it off without thinking. People with a vested interest can write down and then memorize darn near anything. After all, you learned to memorize your number. Why can't someone else?

      What's to stop, say, the car dealer from keeping a copy of your global identifier (say, he's got a tape recorder in his pocket when you say it out loud), and then buying a vacation to Cuba with your identity?

      The answer is, of course, not much.
      --
      AC
  • by i_should_be_working (720372) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:40PM (#12091924)
    I understand the privacy watchdogs being concerned about stuff like this. But it amazes me that I don't hear more complaints from Christians. What with some of them claiming Judgement day is near, and soon we're all going to have the mark of the beast on our hand without which we can't buy stuff, fly or do just about anything else. Maybe I'm just not paying attention.

    As for the article, the whole thing does seem pretty cool. And he talks about how it only has a range of a couple of inches, making it hard for someone to scan his info without his say so. That's a bit more reassuring. But then it also makes it hard to do all the cool stuff we see in the ads like pick up items in a store and then just walk out as your tag gets scanned.

    There should be some kind of flap that blocks a scan, like a mini-faraday cage, that you can easily cover it with. Then we could get these things with long range, but still feel secure.
  • would be to microwave your hand. Don't do it too long though.
  • by Joe the Lesser (533425) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:42PM (#12091968) Homepage Journal
    "Given the choice of Orwellian societies,..."

    Personally, I think I'd rather be part of the contingent that storms congress with an AK-47s then let it come to chips implanted in people's hands. Don't forget the 4th box of liberty. This guy is fubared. What's his statement? I'm gonna bend over now just in case my cellmate is gay?
  • by hey! (33014) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:44PM (#12092002) Homepage Journal
    but I have to say it strikes as, well, stupid to think that you can "opt out" of having somebdoy read something that is implanted in your body and has absolutely no built in security measures at all.

    Saying the read range is only two inches is to count on two things: (1) that the guys who might want to read your implant without your knowledge don't have access to better technology than you do and (2) they aren't clever enough to plant the reader where you will trigger it and won't notice.

    The guy almost has the right idea though. An important quality of a system, if it is to have privacy, is the ability to know when you are being scanned and potentially tracked. This is why biometric face recognition systems, which are advocated by some people on the right, are actually much more dangerous than a national ID card, which is anethema.
  • I thought the point of an Orwellian society is that you can't opt out of it.
  • I can't wait for the Xtreeeme subculture to embrace RFID. When future edgedwellers enter a room, all the phones will light up with their tattoo of the day. Nothing so temporary as a permanent solution.
  • > ...an RFID tag system is easy to manage and opt
    > out of, whereas DNA sampling or facial
    > recognition, well, isn't.

    Don't assume that just because they want to put an RFID tag in you they are not going to also use DNA and facial recognition (if they ever get it to work).
  • Why... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by kevin_conaway (585204) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:57PM (#12092200) Homepage
    Is that comment about "Orweillian" socities in the article summary? Seems like it was just flamebait to get everyone riled up about RFID.

    Its just a neat project about a lazy man making life easier for himself.
  • by Linker3000 (626634) on Wednesday March 30, 2005 @03:58PM (#12092205) Journal
    Watch out for the new line of tin-foil gloves coming soon to a store near you.
  • From the article:

    I don't actually have any modifications myself, aside from this RFID tag now. But, I am planning on getting at least two tattoos sometime soon; once my left hand is healed up, I plan on getting the kanji for patience in the webbing between thumb and index finger basically overtop the RFID tag. In the same place on my right hand, I plan on getting the kanji for now, but I may wait a while; I'm still deciding if I want to put another RFID chip into my right hand. Aside from that, I like to

  • You could just put your RFID device on a bracelet made from a bicycle chain.

    If you want to remove it, you'll need a chain breaking tool, so it's difficult enough to remove by someone who would steal it, and easy enough to remove if you want to "opt out".

    You can even add or remove links if you gain/lose weight.
  • I do not want my finger prints on file
    I do not want my DNA stored for even a short while
    I would not could not install an RFID
    Mr anonynimity, that's me!
  • Well, as the initial designer of the Exxon Speedpass system, I can tell ya' that he is an idiot.

    The problem with those dinky ones is that if they don't have an encrypted code, it doesn't take much to steal his identity (heh). Even at two inches, think how many things you put your hands on in a day. Sheesh!

    BUT skipping all of that, let us assume we have hundreds, nay, THOUSANDS of these dumbass 125 Khz transceivers out there - with the Exxon solution we have a MINIMUM distance of one vehicle. Not much prob
  • How do you close the door on the microwave oven with your hand still inside?

  • Isn't the point of an Orwellian society that you don't really get to opt-out because conformance is required?

    How can you opt out of a system which would be expanded to enforce security, money, identification for benefits etc. allowing you to do nothing without it?

    The poster could have instead just said "given the choice between Orwellian societies I would rather live in a cave on a beach and my volleyball friend".

    Neko
  • Call me a cockeyed optimist but I'm not too worried, at least not about the Government enforcing RFID. Anything they field can easily be defeated, if history is any teacher. Here are my thoughs on some of the issues brought up: 1) "you can't opt out" - Yes you can, you can have the thing removed or destroyed. Even if the government said it's against the law to do so doesn't make it technicly imposible to do. And if enough people do it, it gets to be unenforceable. You can't opt out of DNA and while facial

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