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How much use would you get from a 1 gigabit internet connection?

Displaying poll results.
Lots -- I push a ton of bits almost constantly
  3700 votes / 14%
Some -- I saturate my connection on a regular basis
  8278 votes / 31%
Little -- It would come in handy once in a great while
  6949 votes / 26%
None -- My current connection handles my needs just fine
  2444 votes / 9%
None -- I don't *need* it, I just *want* it
  3598 votes / 13%
I just want to upgrade my telegraph
  916 votes / 3%
25885 total votes.
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  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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How much use would you get from a 1 gigabit internet connection?

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  • by segin (883667) <segin2005@gmail.com> on Wednesday April 23, 2014 @04:00PM (#46826997) Homepage
    So I can run a home server (web, maybe even Plex) and never have to worry about clogging all three megabits of upstream just to watch Star Trek or whatnot.
  • by dreamchaser (49529) on Wednesday April 23, 2014 @06:13PM (#46828225) Homepage Journal

    Not a problem. You watching a movie file doesn't physically remove the file from the server, like loaning a DVD out does.

    Stop thinking of digital data as physical objects.

    Unfortunately the law still treats digital data as a physical object in most instances. Until that changes it's appropriate to discuss it as such.

  • Re:Missed the point (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 24, 2014 @07:04AM (#46831349)

    Optical fiber is ~.66C, while crap copper cable is ~.78C. You'd lose latency... (Excellent copper cable can hit .9C, though it's insanely expensive, big, and unwieldy hard-line coax).

  • by jeffmeden (135043) on Thursday April 24, 2014 @09:15AM (#46832043) Homepage Journal

    Not a problem. You watching a movie file doesn't physically remove the file from the server, like loaning a DVD out does.

    Stop thinking of digital data as physical objects.

    Unfortunately the law still treats digital data as a physical object in most instances. Until that changes it's appropriate to discuss it as such.

    This is exactly right. Truth is, just having a digital, DRM free copy (even if 0 people are watching it) is pretty much illegal. In order to get it you had to either a) pirate it, or b) break the legally-protected encryption on the media you do own. You own the disc, and the right to put it in an approved player and watch it, but anything else you do with it is technically illegal.

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